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By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | April 18, 2011
Burnside Bridge Road, at the bridge over Antietam Creek, was closed Sunday night, according to Washington County Emergency Services. Earlier Sunday, some roads near Conococheague Creek were closed. On Sunday morning, Conococheague Creek at Fairview hit 13.63 feet and remained above the 10-foot flood stage Sunday night, according to the National Weather Service. By 4 a.m. Monday, the creek was at 11.4 feet, the weather service reported. It was expected to recede below flood stage after 2 p.m. Monday.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | March 10, 2011
As rain continues to fall over the Tri-State area Thursday morning, a flood warning for areas of Washington, Jefferson and Berkeley counties through Friday night remains in effect. As of 8:40 a.m. Thursday, 0.60 inches of rain had fallen in Hagerstown since Wednesday, according to Hagerstown weather observer Greg Keefer's website at i4weather.net.   Periods of moderate to heavy rain started Wednesday afternoon and were expected to continue through Thursday night, potentially creating flooding as the storm moves through the Tri-State area.
NEWS
staff reports | July 8, 2005
Remnants of tropical depression Cindy quietly moved through Washington County on Thursday night and this morning, while other parts of the Tri-State area received considerably more rain. National Weather Service meteorologist John Darnley said only 1.46 inches of rain fell at Hagers-town Regional Airport. However, areas near Harpers Ferry, W.Va., and Charles Town, W.Va., received up to four inches of precipitation. National Weather Service warnings issued Thursday called for the possibility of flooding in Washington County; Franklin and Fulton counties in Pennsylvania; and Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan counties in West Virginia.
NEWS
BY BRIAN SHAPPELL | September 9, 2004
shappell@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - The remains of Tropical Storm Frances soaked Washington County Wednesday, prompting area officials and national weather experts to issue a flood warning. According to weather observer Greg Keefer's Web site at www.i4weather.net, Hagerstown received 0.63 inch of rain by 9:15 p.m., Wednesday. The National Weather Service's Sterling, Va., office issued a flash flood warning for Washington County and for parts of West Virginia's Eastern Panhandle Wednesday at 8:46 p.m. The warning was to remain in effect through 12:45 a.m. today, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Web site at www.noaa.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH, DAVE McMILLION and KATE S. ALEXANDER | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | March 11, 2011
After days of rain and flooding, dry weather is finally headed to the Tri-State area. The Hagerstown area is in for several drier days, with precipitation not making its way back to the area until the middle of next week, National Weather Service Meteorologist Bryan Jackson said. The Potomac River, however could still continue to rise Saturday as water makes its way down from higher elevations, Jackson said. Ed Plank, head of the Washington County Highway Department, said earlier Friday that the worst flooding in some parts of the county would not come until after sunset.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | May 13, 2008
TRI-STATE -- The heavy rains that dumped more than four inches of precipitation on parts of Washington County over the past two days led to numerous problems Monday, including flooded basements, rising creeks and rivers, and impassable roads, local officials said. While today's forecast calls for a sunny break in the rain, with a high near 70 in Hagerstown, flooding remains a possibility in some areas as runoff continues to make its way into rivers, according to the National Weather Service.
BREAKINGNEWS
May 19, 2011
A search for someone who might have been in danger in the Potomac River was called off Thursday afternoon when a group of kayakers was found to be OK, a Washington County emergency dispatcher said. A report came in at about 3:30 p.m. that someone might have been stranded in a kayak or small raft in the river near Sandy Hook Road. Emergency crews used rescue boats to search the river where it meets the Shenandoah River, near Harpers Ferry, W.Va. However, shortly after 5 p.m., the rescue effort ended when everyone that was part of a group of kayakers was accounted for. A dispatcher said the kayakers had been in the water earlier and someone reported that someone might have been in danger, but the concern turned out to be unfounded.
NEWS
January 30, 1998
By CLYDE FORD Staff Writer, Charles Town CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - The sky was sunny Thursday, but the rain of recent days sent the Shenandoah River and Opequon Creek spilling out of their banks, officials said. The National Weather Service canceled a flood warning for the Opequon Creek after it crested at about 5 p.m. Thursday at 12 feet, then immediately began to recede, said NWS meteorologist Phil Poole. The flood stage on the Opequon Creek in Martinsburg, W.Va., is 10 feet.
BREAKINGNEWS
May 30, 2012
Close to a dozen Washington County roads that had been closed Tuesday from heavy rains that fell over the area had reopened by Wednesday morning, according to a county highway department official. In Hagerstown, Memorial Boulevard between Potomac and Maryland avenues remained closed Wednesday morning due to high water under the railroad overpass, Washington County spokeswoman Sarah Lankford Sprecher said. Dale Poffenberger, street supervisor for the City of Hagerstown, said workers are draining the water from the street.
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BREAKINGNEWS
May 30, 2012
Close to a dozen Washington County roads that had been closed Tuesday from heavy rains that fell over the area had reopened by Wednesday morning, according to a county highway department official. In Hagerstown, Memorial Boulevard between Potomac and Maryland avenues remained closed Wednesday morning due to high water under the railroad overpass, Washington County spokeswoman Sarah Lankford Sprecher said. Dale Poffenberger, street supervisor for the City of Hagerstown, said workers are draining the water from the street.
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NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION and CALEB CALHOUN | davem@herald-mail.com; caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | May 30, 2012
Thunderstorms rolled through Washington County again Tuesday afternoon and evening, leading to residential flooding in the Claggett's Mill area off Poffenberger Road south of Hagerstown and causing a vehicle to get stuck in water on Cool Hollow Road, according to Washington County 911 officials. The vehicle ran into high water on Cool Hollow Road off Dual Highway at 6:26 p.m., and the occupants were able to get out before rescue officials arrived, 911 officials said. The residential flooding in Claggett's Mill was due to culverts that became clogged, 911 officials said.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
Flood watches throughout the Tri-State area were lifted overnight following several days of rain associated with Tropical Storm Lee. In Hagerstown, less than a half inch of rain fell Thursday and another 0.18 inch through early Friday afternoon, according to weather watcher Greg Keefer's site i4weather.net, bringing the total to 3.63 inches since Monday. Flash-flood watches for Washington County, Franklin County, Pa., and Berkeley and Jefferson counties in West Virginia were lifted overnight, according to the National Weather Service.
BREAKINGNEWS
May 20, 2011
Flood warnings were lifted Friday morning for Washington County, Md., and Jefferson County, W.Va., a day after the Potomac River overflowed its banks following recent heavy rains. A National Weather Service hazardous weather outlook posted Friday afternoon said the region could expect minor flooding along the Potomac River into Friday evening, but nothing more for several days. Flooding was reported Thursday at several locations along the river. According to the National Weather Service, river readings along the Potomac on Friday were (with flood stage in parentheses)
BREAKINGNEWS
May 19, 2011
A search for someone who might have been in danger in the Potomac River was called off Thursday afternoon when a group of kayakers was found to be OK, a Washington County emergency dispatcher said. A report came in at about 3:30 p.m. that someone might have been stranded in a kayak or small raft in the river near Sandy Hook Road. Emergency crews used rescue boats to search the river where it meets the Shenandoah River, near Harpers Ferry, W.Va. However, shortly after 5 p.m., the rescue effort ended when everyone that was part of a group of kayakers was accounted for. A dispatcher said the kayakers had been in the water earlier and someone reported that someone might have been in danger, but the concern turned out to be unfounded.
BREAKINGNEWS
April 29, 2011
Roads were flooded, trees were felled and Tri-State area residents were warned to look out for tornadoes when heavy storms moved through the region Thursday morning. The final local flood warning still in effect, issued for Antietam Creek in the Sharpsburg area, had been lifted by 8 a.m. Friday. The creek was at flood stage of 8 feet as of 3 a.m. Friday, the weather service said. The waters are expected to recede throughout the day. A flood warning for Opequon Creek in Martinsburg, W.Va., was lifted earlier Friday morning, the weather service said.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | April 18, 2011
Burnside Bridge Road, at the bridge over Antietam Creek, was closed Sunday night, according to Washington County Emergency Services. Earlier Sunday, some roads near Conococheague Creek were closed. On Sunday morning, Conococheague Creek at Fairview hit 13.63 feet and remained above the 10-foot flood stage Sunday night, according to the National Weather Service. By 4 a.m. Monday, the creek was at 11.4 feet, the weather service reported. It was expected to recede below flood stage after 2 p.m. Monday.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH, DAVE McMILLION and KATE S. ALEXANDER | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | March 11, 2011
After days of rain and flooding, dry weather is finally headed to the Tri-State area. The Hagerstown area is in for several drier days, with precipitation not making its way back to the area until the middle of next week, National Weather Service Meteorologist Bryan Jackson said. The Potomac River, however could still continue to rise Saturday as water makes its way down from higher elevations, Jackson said. Ed Plank, head of the Washington County Highway Department, said earlier Friday that the worst flooding in some parts of the county would not come until after sunset.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH and DAVE McMILLION | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com; davem@herald-mail.com | March 11, 2011
The head of the Washington County Highway Department said the worst flooding in some parts of the county won’t come until after sunset tonight. That’s when rain from Thursday’s heavy downpours will make its way from higher elevations to low-lying areas, Washington County Highway Department Director Ed Plank said. “Based on the reports we’re getting, it won’t crest until sunset,” Plank said Friday morning. “We’re hoping people stay out of the high waters because it’s very dangerous.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | March 10, 2011
As rain continues to fall over the Tri-State area Thursday morning, a flood warning for areas of Washington, Jefferson and Berkeley counties through Friday night remains in effect. As of 8:40 a.m. Thursday, 0.60 inches of rain had fallen in Hagerstown since Wednesday, according to Hagerstown weather observer Greg Keefer's website at i4weather.net.   Periods of moderate to heavy rain started Wednesday afternoon and were expected to continue through Thursday night, potentially creating flooding as the storm moves through the Tri-State area.
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