Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsFlood Insurance
IN THE NEWS

Flood Insurance

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | September 2, 2010
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Federal Emergency Management Agency changes to flood plain maps in Franklin County, Pa., could lead to additional property owners being required to carry flood insurance, municipal officials said Wednesday. Flood plains are shown around smaller waterways such as Spring Run, Biesecker Run and Bailey's Run for the first time in Washington Township, Pa., according to township officials. "Some banks say if a flood plain is in your yard, they want flood insurance," Township Manager Mike Christopher said Wednesday.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | February 28, 2011
Some residents who live near Washington County’s many streams, creeks and tributaries soon could be required to purchase flood insurance. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is updating its flood insurance study and rate maps, and, in Maryland, is using new analytical processes that will improve the accuracy of determining floodplains. The outcome will determine which buildings lie in special flood hazard areas and who needs to buy flood insurance. Representatives of FEMA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE)
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | January 19, 2013
Rate increases of 25 percent per year for government-subsidized flood insurance premiums for certain nonprimary residences have been set in motion. The rate increases, which started Jan. 1, will continue each year until they reflect full-risk rates, Berkeley County officials recently were told by Richard L. Carte of the state Floodplain Management Program. The increases are affecting owners of homes in Berkeley County that were built before 1988, county Planning Director Mike Thompson said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | September 22, 2011
Effective Oct. 1, Berkeley County residents who have flood insurance could net a 15 percent discount on their premiums thanks to county floodplain-management efforts, officials said. Donna Seiler, the county's litter control and code enforcement officer, attributed the new Class 7 community rating to multiple people involved with efforts to tackle flood mitigation, particularly cleanup efforts in Sportsman's Paradise and adoption of the county's Clean and Safe County ordinance in August 2010.
NEWS
by Lynn Little | December 2, 2005
Many of us have contributed funds to help those who suffered great losses from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. We might not be thinking, however, about taking care of ourselves in the event a disaster would strike here. This should also be a wake-up call for us to take stock of what we have in order to help us recover from devastating and unexpected occurrences. The most important step you can take is to make a complete inventory of your personal property. The list should include the item, a description, make, model and when it was purchased.
NEWS
March 3, 2011
Cleanup day set Smithsburg's annual spring cleanup day has been scheduled for April 30. The event, which is held on the property of Smithsburg Emergency Medical Services along Railroad Lane, will start at 7 a.m.,  town officials said at a Smithsburg Town Council meeting Tuesday night. The program will run until "the Dumpsters are full," officials said. The cleanup day is offered to town residents to help them dispose of unwanted items. Anything that would be accepted at the county landfill can be disposed of, officials said.
NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | June 29, 2006
FUNKSTOWN Residents of Antietam Village in Funkstown stood on West Poplar Street watching Wednesday morning as Antietam Creek overflowed into their yards and mobile homes after four days of rain that totaled more than 8 inches. "We just brought out stuff we had to wear and medical supplies," said Pat Patterson, who said a neighbor woke him around 3 a.m., when the water flooded over the bank. Patterson, who has lived in the mobile home park since 1984, remembers four other floods, but he said he hasn't considered moving.
NEWS
by DON AINES | November 1, 2005
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A Chambersburg family Monday night asked the borough council for help in fixing damage to their home caused when a municipal water line broke and flooded their basement in August. Josh and Kathryn Manges of 171 Mill Road said the water line broke Aug. 12 and flooded the basement with several feet of water, leaving them without a functioning furnace. Estimates they have received for cleaning and repairing their home, and the money they have already spent, come to about $9,500.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | September 5, 2003
tammyb@herald-mail.com If this week's rain was an inconvenience for most of us, it was a nightmare for several residents of St. James Village. The standing water in Michelle Gaisor's back yard Wednesday night "looked like a river," she said. Water in the street was "thigh high" on a 6-foot-tall man, Gaisor said. "It was amazing. " Her neighbor, Denise Haley, had 5 feet of water in her basement. "It was just three or four steps from my main floor," she said.
NEWS
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY | November 20, 1998
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Several Rocky Marsh-area residents voiced concerns to the Berkeley County Commission Thursday morning that a revised flood plain ordinance would restrict efforts to solve flooding problems. They were assured by Commission President James "Jim" Smith and other county officials that the ordinance wouldn't hinder efforts to get federal permission to clean up Rocky Marsh Run or put gravel on the road leading to their homes. Smith said the ordinance - including flood plain maps of the Rocky Marsh area updated by FEMA - had to be adopted under federal law so county residents could continue getting flood insurance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | January 19, 2013
Rate increases of 25 percent per year for government-subsidized flood insurance premiums for certain nonprimary residences have been set in motion. The rate increases, which started Jan. 1, will continue each year until they reflect full-risk rates, Berkeley County officials recently were told by Richard L. Carte of the state Floodplain Management Program. The increases are affecting owners of homes in Berkeley County that were built before 1988, county Planning Director Mike Thompson said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | September 22, 2011
Effective Oct. 1, Berkeley County residents who have flood insurance could net a 15 percent discount on their premiums thanks to county floodplain-management efforts, officials said. Donna Seiler, the county's litter control and code enforcement officer, attributed the new Class 7 community rating to multiple people involved with efforts to tackle flood mitigation, particularly cleanup efforts in Sportsman's Paradise and adoption of the county's Clean and Safe County ordinance in August 2010.
NEWS
March 3, 2011
Cleanup day set Smithsburg's annual spring cleanup day has been scheduled for April 30. The event, which is held on the property of Smithsburg Emergency Medical Services along Railroad Lane, will start at 7 a.m.,  town officials said at a Smithsburg Town Council meeting Tuesday night. The program will run until "the Dumpsters are full," officials said. The cleanup day is offered to town residents to help them dispose of unwanted items. Anything that would be accepted at the county landfill can be disposed of, officials said.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | February 28, 2011
Some residents who live near Washington County’s many streams, creeks and tributaries soon could be required to purchase flood insurance. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is updating its flood insurance study and rate maps, and, in Maryland, is using new analytical processes that will improve the accuracy of determining floodplains. The outcome will determine which buildings lie in special flood hazard areas and who needs to buy flood insurance. Representatives of FEMA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE)
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | September 2, 2010
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Federal Emergency Management Agency changes to flood plain maps in Franklin County, Pa., could lead to additional property owners being required to carry flood insurance, municipal officials said Wednesday. Flood plains are shown around smaller waterways such as Spring Run, Biesecker Run and Bailey's Run for the first time in Washington Township, Pa., according to township officials. "Some banks say if a flood plain is in your yard, they want flood insurance," Township Manager Mike Christopher said Wednesday.
NEWS
September 7, 2006
"I would like to vote for the county commissioners that would run the county like a person does their home. If we can't afford something, tell who ever wants it that we can't afford it, maybe next year. That includes the BOE. " - Boonsboro "I'm reading Friday, Sept. 1, Daily Mail, Mail Call, and a person has called in saying the reason people couldn't get flood insurance was because they didn't have mortgages. This is not true. Anyone can buy flood insurance, as long as you make the payments to the insurance company.
NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | June 29, 2006
FUNKSTOWN Residents of Antietam Village in Funkstown stood on West Poplar Street watching Wednesday morning as Antietam Creek overflowed into their yards and mobile homes after four days of rain that totaled more than 8 inches. "We just brought out stuff we had to wear and medical supplies," said Pat Patterson, who said a neighbor woke him around 3 a.m., when the water flooded over the bank. Patterson, who has lived in the mobile home park since 1984, remembers four other floods, but he said he hasn't considered moving.
NEWS
by Lynn Little | December 2, 2005
Many of us have contributed funds to help those who suffered great losses from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. We might not be thinking, however, about taking care of ourselves in the event a disaster would strike here. This should also be a wake-up call for us to take stock of what we have in order to help us recover from devastating and unexpected occurrences. The most important step you can take is to make a complete inventory of your personal property. The list should include the item, a description, make, model and when it was purchased.
NEWS
by DON AINES | November 1, 2005
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A Chambersburg family Monday night asked the borough council for help in fixing damage to their home caused when a municipal water line broke and flooded their basement in August. Josh and Kathryn Manges of 171 Mill Road said the water line broke Aug. 12 and flooded the basement with several feet of water, leaving them without a functioning furnace. Estimates they have received for cleaning and repairing their home, and the money they have already spent, come to about $9,500.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | September 5, 2003
tammyb@herald-mail.com If this week's rain was an inconvenience for most of us, it was a nightmare for several residents of St. James Village. The standing water in Michelle Gaisor's back yard Wednesday night "looked like a river," she said. Water in the street was "thigh high" on a 6-foot-tall man, Gaisor said. "It was amazing. " Her neighbor, Denise Haley, had 5 feet of water in her basement. "It was just three or four steps from my main floor," she said.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|