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Flat Tax

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NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | January 23, 2004
laurae@herald-mail.com Washington County lawmakers on Thursday shot down a plan to charge property owners $10 a year to pay for land preservation. A request of the Washington County Commissioners, the flat tax would have replaced a requirement that the county spend $400,000 of its transfer tax collections on land preservation. At the first meeting of the session for the Washington County Delegation to the Maryland General Assembly, Del. John P. Donoghue, D-Washington, made a motion to submit the flat tax legislation.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | March 19, 2013
A bill introduced by Del. Andrew A. Serafini, R-Washington, in the Maryland General Assembly seeks to change the state's tax policy significantly, by proposing a state flat income tax of 4.51 percent on federal gross adjusted income for all Marylanders. “The bill is revenue neutral,” Serafini said, meaning that the state would raise approximately the same amount of revenue from the new proposal as under existing tax laws if the bill were to become law. Federally gross adjusted income refers to income earned after deductions such as student loans and some types of expenses.
NEWS
By Tamela Baker | September 11, 2005
Most Washington County officials insist new development should pay for itself, but determining how to charge developers for costs of new roads, schools and infrastructure can be a challenge. With changes to the excise tax approved by the General Assembly this spring and enacted by the Washington County Commissioners this summer, Washington County entered a period of transition. Fees and agreements reached between developers and the county government for roads and schools under the current Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance remain in place and vary depending on where the development occurs and the impact the development will have, Public Works Director Gary Rohrer said.
NEWS
BY TIM ROWLAND | March 21, 2002
I have to say this very quietly, or I'll get censored by the editors and ostracized by my colleagues. But there are hideous doins in the local media - hideous, hideous doins. Liberal biases, right-wing conspiracies, devious subplots and cover-ups and lies upon lies. Yes, I've been a part of it for the last 20 years, but I am ready to come clean. Nay, I must come clean to bare my soul, staunch my bleeding conscience and apply a soothing balm to the nerves that have been frayed over the years by the rasp of deception.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | October 28, 2012
After years of representing a comfortably Republican swath of Maryland, U.S. Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett is trying to win an 11th term in a district that now leans Democrat. Bartlett is facing Democrat John Delaney, a well-funded financier, and Libertarian Nickolaus Mueller, a research scientist. One of the biggest factors in the race is the reversal in voter enrollment in the 6th District through redistricting, a process that was driven by Democrats in power in Annapolis. Before the state's congressional districts were redrawn last fall, 47 percent of the 6th District's registered voters were Republicans and 36 percent were Democrats.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | October 11, 2012
With less than a month before the general election, voters had a rare chance Thursday to hear from and contrast all three candidates running for Maryland's 6th District seat in Congress. Roscoe G. Bartlett, the Republican incumbent, and Democratic nominee John Delaney were joined by Libertarian candidate Nickolaus Mueller at a candidate forum sponsored by The Herald-Mail Co. Moderator Raychel Harvey-Jones, the news director of HMTV6, asked each candidate several preselected questions, plus a few from the audience of about 130 people at Hagerstown Community College's Kepler Theater.
NEWS
By ROBERT GARY | March 22, 2008
The idea of progressive taxation rather than a flat tax seems right to me and here's why. Let's say the flat tax rate is 25 percent. So the guy making $100 million keeps $75 million after taxes, and the guy making $40,000 keeps $30,000 after taxes. In my opinion, that is not fair, because the loss of $10,000 by the lower-earning guy has a huge impact on his life, whereas the loss of $25 million to the senior corporate executive has almost no impact. He can scrape by on the other $75 million without asking for food stamps or Medicaid.
OPINION
December 7, 2012
Flat tax rate would help balance the federal budget To the editor: I enjoyed George Michael's article, “ Going for a quick fix ,” in The Herald-Mail on Nov. 30. Earlier I had sent a similar letter to President Obama. The same message could apply to our elected officials in Maryland. Dear President Obama, Let's be fair! You pushed for equity, regardless of sexual orientation, in marriage. Now it is time to push for equity in the percentage of income tax each person pays.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | March 17, 2005
tammyb@herald-mail.com ANNAPOLIS - Although potential amendments to a bill to revise Washington County's building excise tax triggered a tempest back home, the bill sailed through a House committee hearing Wednesday without so much as a thunderclap. As chairman of the Washington County Delegation to the General Assembly, Del. Christopher B. Shank presented the bill to the House Ways and Means Committee for review. Joined by committee members LeRoy E. Myers, R-Washington/Allegany, and Robert A. McKee, R-Washington, Shank explained that the original excise tax legislation approved in 2003, which put a $1 per square foot cap on the tax, did not anticipate the rate of growth the county has experienced since then.
NEWS
July 11, 2007
Commissioners give guidance on excise tax The head of a group studying the county's excise tax system got guidance Tuesday from the Washington County Commissioners. John Schnebly is the chairman of a task force that will meet over the next several weeks to consider a new tax structure. The task force must send the commissioners and the county's state lawmakers a report by Sept. 30. A bill passed during the last session of the Maryland General Assembly lets the county remove the cap on its excise tax on new construction for one year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | March 19, 2013
A bill introduced by Del. Andrew A. Serafini, R-Washington, in the Maryland General Assembly seeks to change the state's tax policy significantly, by proposing a state flat income tax of 4.51 percent on federal gross adjusted income for all Marylanders. “The bill is revenue neutral,” Serafini said, meaning that the state would raise approximately the same amount of revenue from the new proposal as under existing tax laws if the bill were to become law. Federally gross adjusted income refers to income earned after deductions such as student loans and some types of expenses.
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OPINION
March 11, 2013
Cardin should focus more onbudget, less on columns To the editor: “Quick action can fend off sequestration” is the headline on Sen. Ben Cardin's column of Feb. 27. He uses the first six paragraphs of this column to promote the liberal scare tactics that Maryland will be devastated as a result of this “scarequester.” Anyone who remotely follows the news regarding this issue knows that the sequester does not reduce spending,...
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | October 28, 2012
After years of representing a comfortably Republican swath of Maryland, U.S. Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett is trying to win an 11th term in a district that now leans Democrat. Bartlett is facing Democrat John Delaney, a well-funded financier, and Libertarian Nickolaus Mueller, a research scientist. One of the biggest factors in the race is the reversal in voter enrollment in the 6th District through redistricting, a process that was driven by Democrats in power in Annapolis. Before the state's congressional districts were redrawn last fall, 47 percent of the 6th District's registered voters were Republicans and 36 percent were Democrats.
NEWS
October 27, 2012
Date of birth : May 2, 1985 Hometown : Born in Chicago, currently in Baltimore Education : Bachelor of science in electrical engineering, 2007; Bachelor of science in mathematics, 2007; master of science in electrical engineering, 2009 Occupation : Research scientist Party affiliation : Libertarian Political experience : None Q : How important is it that the United States reduce its debt? How and when should that be done? Nickolaus Mueller, Libertarian : It is very important that the United States reduce its debt, and as quickly as possible.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | October 11, 2012
With less than a month before the general election, voters had a rare chance Thursday to hear from and contrast all three candidates running for Maryland's 6th District seat in Congress. Roscoe G. Bartlett, the Republican incumbent, and Democratic nominee John Delaney were joined by Libertarian candidate Nickolaus Mueller at a candidate forum sponsored by The Herald-Mail Co. Moderator Raychel Harvey-Jones, the news director of HMTV6, asked each candidate several preselected questions, plus a few from the audience of about 130 people at Hagerstown Community College's Kepler Theater.
NEWS
August 7, 2012
“I'd just like to say that whether you call it Obamacare or the Affordable Health Care Act, I just received a letter from my health care provider, insurance company, that said I'm going to get a rebate. Being on a fixed income as a retiree, I think it's fantastic, regardless of whether it's Obamacare or Affordable Health Care, that I can get a rebate from my insurance company. First time in 40-some years that I can recall ever getting something like that.” - Hagerstown “U.S.
NEWS
March 24, 2012
Following are the responses to three questions The Herald-Mail posed to candidates for Maryland's 6th Congressional District seat. The candidates were asked to limit their responses to 75 words. Those responses that exceeded that limit were edited. Except for minor editing for clarity, the responses are as the candidates submitted them. Kathy Afzali, 54 Middletown Republican 1. What is the best way to create new jobs? All of the GOP presidential candidates are pro-business and with a Republican victory against the job-killing Obama agenda, I believe that consumer confidence will increase significantly and help turn the economy around.
NEWS
By ROBERT GARY | March 22, 2008
The idea of progressive taxation rather than a flat tax seems right to me and here's why. Let's say the flat tax rate is 25 percent. So the guy making $100 million keeps $75 million after taxes, and the guy making $40,000 keeps $30,000 after taxes. In my opinion, that is not fair, because the loss of $10,000 by the lower-earning guy has a huge impact on his life, whereas the loss of $25 million to the senior corporate executive has almost no impact. He can scrape by on the other $75 million without asking for food stamps or Medicaid.
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