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Fertilizer

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NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | jsemler@umd.edu | April 9, 2012
Spring has sprung and many in the community are hard at spring chores. This is the time of year that many a pound of fertilizer is applied to hill and dale. Before you open the fertilizer or dust off your spreader, ask yourself this question, “Have I taken a soil sample?” If the answer is “no,” then the next question is, “Why am I going to spread fertilizer?” Much has been made of the need to improve the health of the bay and how we all have a responsibility to help.  Nutrient management is now a fact of life for every farmer in Maryland.
NEWS
By BOB KESSLER | June 7, 2008
The end of May, around Memorial Day, is a good time to apply your first application of fertilizer for the year. This follows a conservative approach to lawn care. Research has shown that three applications of fertilizer per year are quite adequate to maintain a healthy lawn. Before you purchase your fertilizer, you need to know how many square feet of lawn you have. Don't go by your lot size, because on your lot you have a house, driveway, flower beds, etc. So it is best to measure your lawn carefully so you can figure your yard's area, at least to the nearest 1,000 square feet.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | March 14, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - An explosion Tuesday tore a hole in the roof of a building where a company turns sludge into fertilizer for the City of Hagerstown at a water-treatment facility on Frederick Street. One man sustained minor injuries but declined treatment after the early-evening explosion, according to Mike Spiker, director of utilities for the City of Hagerstown. Soot covered the edges of a jagged hole in the roof of a beige building near the back of the city's treatment plant.
NEWS
by JEFF SEMLER | April 24, 2007
If the weather man is correct today, the sun is shining and the mercury is flirting with the 70-degree mark. The ground has adequate moisture and men and machinery alike are readying for field work. Most are probably in the field as you read this. Spring is a wonderful time of year of rebirth and renewal. Tiny seeds are being stuck in the ground right now that will yield the bounty of the summer and fall harvest. With the soaring cost of fuel and fertilizers, farmers will need to be even more frugal.
NEWS
November 10, 2009
These sweet potatoes were grown by 79-year-old Ellis Strite of Kemps Mill. The largest weighed 6 pounds, 15 ounces, with a 20-inch circumference. The other two weighed more than 4 1/2 pounds each. He said the only thing he did when he planted them was put mulch on them. He didn't use fertilizer or other additives.
NEWS
By BOB KESSLER | November 15, 2008
A holiday door wreath adds a great touch to decorating your home. To make your own wreath, attend the two-part wreath workshop of the Penn State master gardeners of Franklin County on Monday, Dec. 1, and Wednesday, Dec. 3. The wreath will be based on a straw frame. In the first session, participants will create the frame and go over ideas for decorating it. Participants will bring materials for completing the wreath to the second session and finish the project. The master gardeners will provide some material for participants to use. Cost of the workshop is $25. The workshops will be 10 a.m. to noon on both days and will be held at the new Ag Heritage Building, 181 Franklin Farm Lane.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | jsemler@umd.edu | May 1, 2012
My last article dealt with soil testing and how it is a good idea for more than just farmers. I have received several calls and emails regarding soil testing and fertilization.  In order to help shed additional light on the subject, I will deal with fertilizing facts for the home lawn. Much of this information can be found in Home & Garden Memo No. HG 103, published by and available from University of Maryland Extension. A good lawn needs adequate nutrients for good growth. Lawns need regular fertilization to keep the grass growing and weeds out. The best way to determine a fertilization program for your lawn is to take a soil test.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | December 14, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - Growing up on a farm in the Williamsport area, Brian Forsythe knew from an early age that he wanted to find a career that would keep him rooted in the earth. And he has. Forsythe, 22, recently landed a job at the Maryland Cooperative Extension on Sharpsburg Pike. His official title is nutrient management adviser, Antietam Watershed project agricultural nutrient management program. Growing up working on the family orchard and dairy farm, Forsythe was active in 4-H with dairy cows.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | October 9, 2007
The weather has been making news everywhere lately, with landslides in California to hurricanes in Central America. Closer to home it is dry. September 2007 was the driest September in Hagerstown with 0.18 inches of rain. Also, we have experienced extreme heat conditions during the dry spell from June 1 until the end of September; with 34 days over 90 degrees and September temperatures averaged 3.6 degrees above "normal. " Fall is a time of year that can lull you to sleep a little bit when it comes to weather.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | December 13, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY ? Growing up on a farm in the Williamsport area, Brian Forsythe knew from an early age that he wanted to find a career that would keep him rooted in the earth. And he has. Forsythe, 22, recently landed a job at the Maryland Cooperative Extension on Sharpsburg Pike. His official title is nutrient management adviser, Antietam Watershed project agricultural nutrient management program. "I take soil samples and send them off for analysis," Forsythe said. Based on the results, he then writes up a nutrient program and advises the client what to add, when to add it or what not to add in the way of fertilizer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 25, 2012
“I see a former city council member thinks that the city mishandled the anonymous donor, whoever that might have been, for the stadium. Well, look at yourselves in the mirror, council people, the past council. And maybe you should ask yourself, why were we being so secretive? Why weren't we more open with the public? This anonymous donor should have been open with the public, especially when it came to that much money and that much work downtown. And I think our county commissioners should take note also.
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NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | jsemler@umd.edu | May 1, 2012
My last article dealt with soil testing and how it is a good idea for more than just farmers. I have received several calls and emails regarding soil testing and fertilization.  In order to help shed additional light on the subject, I will deal with fertilizing facts for the home lawn. Much of this information can be found in Home & Garden Memo No. HG 103, published by and available from University of Maryland Extension. A good lawn needs adequate nutrients for good growth. Lawns need regular fertilization to keep the grass growing and weeds out. The best way to determine a fertilization program for your lawn is to take a soil test.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | jsemler@umd.edu | April 9, 2012
Spring has sprung and many in the community are hard at spring chores. This is the time of year that many a pound of fertilizer is applied to hill and dale. Before you open the fertilizer or dust off your spreader, ask yourself this question, “Have I taken a soil sample?” If the answer is “no,” then the next question is, “Why am I going to spread fertilizer?” Much has been made of the need to improve the health of the bay and how we all have a responsibility to help.  Nutrient management is now a fact of life for every farmer in Maryland.
BREAKINGNEWS
August 5, 2011
A blown tire triggered the crash of a tanker truck carrying liquid fertilizer Friday afternoon, injuring the Washington County driver and closing westbound Interstate 70 near Hancock for several hours, Maryland State Police said. Wayne Larry Bartles, of Mason Dixon Road north of Hagerstown, was flown by medevac helicopter to Meritus Medical Center to be treated for his injuries, according to a state police news release. Bartles was listed in good condition Friday night, a hospital spokeswoman said.
NEWS
November 10, 2009
These sweet potatoes were grown by 79-year-old Ellis Strite of Kemps Mill. The largest weighed 6 pounds, 15 ounces, with a 20-inch circumference. The other two weighed more than 4 1/2 pounds each. He said the only thing he did when he planted them was put mulch on them. He didn't use fertilizer or other additives.
NEWS
By BOB KESSLER | November 15, 2008
A holiday door wreath adds a great touch to decorating your home. To make your own wreath, attend the two-part wreath workshop of the Penn State master gardeners of Franklin County on Monday, Dec. 1, and Wednesday, Dec. 3. The wreath will be based on a straw frame. In the first session, participants will create the frame and go over ideas for decorating it. Participants will bring materials for completing the wreath to the second session and finish the project. The master gardeners will provide some material for participants to use. Cost of the workshop is $25. The workshops will be 10 a.m. to noon on both days and will be held at the new Ag Heritage Building, 181 Franklin Farm Lane.
NEWS
October 18, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A northern California hydroponics company is rehabilitating a former apple packing plant in Berkeley County to produce liquid fertilizer products, Berkeley County Development Authority Stephen L. Christian said Friday. General Hydroponics of Sebastopol, Calif., is expected to employ more than 30 people full time at the 50,000-square-foot rehabilitated plant near Apple Harvest Drive (W.Va. 45) and Pitzers Chapel Road, Christian said. When fully operational, the former McDonald Apple plant is expected to manufacture more than 30,000 gallons of products daily, Christian said.
NEWS
By BOB KESSLER | June 7, 2008
The end of May, around Memorial Day, is a good time to apply your first application of fertilizer for the year. This follows a conservative approach to lawn care. Research has shown that three applications of fertilizer per year are quite adequate to maintain a healthy lawn. Before you purchase your fertilizer, you need to know how many square feet of lawn you have. Don't go by your lot size, because on your lot you have a house, driveway, flower beds, etc. So it is best to measure your lawn carefully so you can figure your yard's area, at least to the nearest 1,000 square feet.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | December 14, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - Growing up on a farm in the Williamsport area, Brian Forsythe knew from an early age that he wanted to find a career that would keep him rooted in the earth. And he has. Forsythe, 22, recently landed a job at the Maryland Cooperative Extension on Sharpsburg Pike. His official title is nutrient management adviser, Antietam Watershed project agricultural nutrient management program. Growing up working on the family orchard and dairy farm, Forsythe was active in 4-H with dairy cows.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | December 13, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY ? Growing up on a farm in the Williamsport area, Brian Forsythe knew from an early age that he wanted to find a career that would keep him rooted in the earth. And he has. Forsythe, 22, recently landed a job at the Maryland Cooperative Extension on Sharpsburg Pike. His official title is nutrient management adviser, Antietam Watershed project agricultural nutrient management program. "I take soil samples and send them off for analysis," Forsythe said. Based on the results, he then writes up a nutrient program and advises the client what to add, when to add it or what not to add in the way of fertilizer.
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