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NEWS
by TARA REILLY | August 20, 2002
tarar@herald-mail.com William Russell thinks development in the county should be slowed down, the Sheriff's Department needs more deputies and the Board of Education has too many high-ranking administrators - issues he will focus on if elected a Washington County Commissioner. "I think we're growing way too fast," said Russell, a Republican. "We just got to have some smart growth. We can't just have houses and apartments built everywhere. " Russell, 38, said he moved to Washington County from Charles County 12 years ago and has noticed that acres of farmland have been sucked up by development since then.
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NEWS
BY BOB MAGINNIS | May 3, 2002
On Tuesday three Washington County Commissioners got to heart of the matter quickly as they discussed the proposed update of the county's Comprehensive Plan. The immediate question for them, and for everyone who owns more than an acre of property, is: How many homes can I build if I subdivide it? But the issue is more complicated than that and the community's future demands more in-depth analysis. The three commissioners - William Wivell. Pal Swartz and Gregory Snook - told The Herald-Mail they weren't sure citizens understand that, if enacted, the update would reduce the number of homes that could be built in preservation, conservation and agricultural districts.
NEWS
July 17, 2009
Suddenly, something that Washington County has in spades is fashionable again - rural farmland. Those who spent the last 15 years figuring out how to spin open fields into strip mall and subdivision gold might have somewhat run their course, as the nation is becoming more aware of the value of locally grown foods and pastoral settings. Small growers are popping up in Washington County as fast-food joints once did, producing everything from delicious, pasture-raised poulet rouge chicken to meaty Boer goats targeted to the growing ethnic population.
NEWS
May 21, 2001
Farm quail habitat restored in W.Va. By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer, Waynesboro SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - Martha Knott Putz remembers growing up at Willow Well, her family's 215-acre farm on Molers Crossroads, and the call of the bobwhite quail that whistled across the fields. She also remembers when the quails' calls could no longer be heard. "We stopped seeing them in the early 1980s," Putz said. "There were a lot of quail around before then. My father and his friends used to hunt them.
NEWS
April 3, 2005
Locally grown - in Mexico To the editor: This letter is food for your thoughts, because pretty soon we will be eating our thoughts. That is because our farmland will be nonexistent due to the development and unchecked growth in this area. If you take a ride around Washington County, you will notice that new home construction has increased significantly in the past few years. New homes are being built where farm fields once existed. If you ride along Mapleville Road from Boonsboro toward Hagerstown, you will notice a new development being built by a local developer.
NEWS
August 25, 2006
Happy Retreat group receives $30,000 CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Members of the organization that is behind the effort to purchase the historic Happy Retreat Home are now $30,000 closer to their goal. The Jefferson County Commission proposed giving The Friends of Happy Retreat $15,000, but only if the City of Charles Town gave that amount. The city agreed Monday to give the group the $15,000, officials said Thursday. The Friends of Happy Retreat formed to purchase the home of Charles Washington, the brother of George Washington and founder of Charles Town, and make it available for public use. Although the asking price is $2.5 million, the group wants to initially raise $100,000 to set up an office for operations, get consulting work started for the purchase attempt and pay for other expenses.
NEWS
By MATTHEW BIENIEK | July 14, 1998
Washington County Commissioner candidate Joseph Swope says he favors revising county zoning laws and adopting impact fees. "Anyone who says impact fees will stop growth needs to look at the growth in Frederick County," he said. Impact fees could provide funding for roads, water, and sewer, all of which are needed if growth is to continue, he said. Frederick County's impact fees were raised on July 1 of this year, according to Mike Thompson, zoning administrator for the county.
NEWS
February 21, 2006
The second annual Forum for Rural Innovation will be held Friday, March 10, at the Best Western Lee-Jackson Motor Inn & Conference Center in Winchester, Va. The event showcases innovative ideas, projects or programs that enhance farm or rural business profitability, conserve farmland and natural resources, or develop new approaches to rural prosperity that are viable in an expensive farmland-upscale consumer environment, according to the Jefferson...
NEWS
by Tom Riford | October 8, 2004
While Washington County makes a perfect fall weekend getaway for folks from Baltimore or D.C., autumn is truly beloved by locals who know about the great things we have here. Among the many attractions of our county, one of the most appealing is driving the back roads and taking in the splendid scenic views. At every crest of every hill, a new vista spreads before you - each lovelier than the one before. Because much of Washington County retains its rural charm, nowhere will one find a prettier display of old-fashioned family farms, still going about their business of providing sustenance for our tables.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | March 29, 2008
ROUZERVILLE, Pa. -- More than four years have passed since the Washington Township (Pa.) Supervisors rezoned 1,000 acres of farmland in one night. Their decisions on Jan. 19, 2004, and many since have opened up parts of the township to development around the path of Washington Township Boulevard, a $14.3 million relief route planned north of Waynesboro. The focus of township officials thus far has been concentrated on the four to five miles engineered between Pa. 16 in Rouzerville to Pa. 997 near Tomstown Road.
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