Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsFarmland
IN THE NEWS

Farmland

NEWS
July 6, 2005
BOONSBORO - Mayor Charles F. "Skip" Kauffman Jr. announced Tuesday night that $75,000 in Project Open Space money has been secured to further pay off the $600,000 spent five or six years ago to purchase the King farmland adjacent to Shafer Park. "The Washington County Commissioners have been true to their word," Kauffman said. "We have recovered about 95 percent of that money. " Efforts are under way to obtain money to develop that land, Kauffman said.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 12, 2004
The Board of Commissioners of Franklin County, Pa., this week considered a $39 million bond issue, in part to purchase the development rights on another 2,000 acres of farmland. The county hopes to have 10,000 acres in the program by 2007, but Warren G. Elliott, the commissioners' chairman, says even that won't create a "sustainable mass" to keep farming the county's top industry. Without even more easement purchases, the businesses that now serve agriculture won't be able to continue, he said.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | October 8, 2004
Thefts, vandalism reported at lot CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - People have been vandalizing and stealing items out of cars in the train commuter parking lot at Duffields, Jefferson County Commissioner Rusty Morgan said Thursday. Police have been called when the thefts and vandalism occur, but it appears there is little they can do, the commissioners said. Perhaps the MARC commuter train service can do something to control the problem, the commissioners said. Or maybe police patrols can be increased in the area, said Commissioner Greg Corliss.
NEWS
July 17, 2008
From the week of July 13, 1958 ยท The Washington County Office of the Clerk of Court collected $266,633.05 in fees of all kinds during the year that ended June 30. The figure is the highest for any year in the history of the office. Deeds and mortgages recorded here totaled 4,389 for the year. Marriage licenses totaled 2,485, and returned $14,930 in fees. Beer, wine and liquor licenses brought in almost $53,000. Hunting and fishing licenses issued amounted to nearly $6,000 in fees.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | March 16, 2004
waynesboro@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, Pa. - In recent months, the Washington Township Supervisors have rezoned more than 1,000 acres of farmland for residential and commercial uses, paving the way for the area's first Wal-Mart store plus more than 1,300 new homes. On Monday night the supervisors went in an opposite direction when they honored a local family's request to rezone more than 16 acres of land currently zoned for single and multi-family houses back to farmland.
NEWS
December 7, 1999
How did Accident, Md., get its name? By accident, of course. Surveyors were sent out on separate expeditions for Lord Baltimore and William Penn after the King of England made them land grants in the New World, said Accident Town Clerk Ruth Ann Hahn. Instructed to survey the best farmland so many miles west of Baltimore, both surveyors ended up marking the same oak tree, leading the area to be dubbed "accidental tract," Hahn said. By about 1800, the area, also called Flowery Vale in the early days of settlement, was being called Accident, she said.
NEWS
November 6, 2009
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- Winners of the second annual farmland preservation art contest, the "Preserving Our Agricultural Heritage Art Show," will be announced at 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 14, during a reception at the Ag Heritage Center, 185 Franklin Farm Lane. Paintings, photographs and digital images by artists of ages will be on view through Saturday, Nov. 21. For more information, contact Carolyn Baker at 717-597-2186, ext. 1301, 717-765-0210 or csbaker@greencastle.k12.pa.
NEWS
April 17, 1997
By MARLO BARNHART Staff Writer CLEAR SPRING - Many of the people who attended a informational meeting Wednesday about sludge being applied to nearby farmland signed a petition asking the landowner to stop the practice. "In March, James Harp, the landowner, told me he would pull the plug if there were objections to the sludge on his land," said Jack Manuel, who lives adjacent to the farmland in question. There were objections from many of the approximately 20 people at the meeting, despite studies from several Maryland Department of the Environment officials which they said showed sludge application is safe and effective.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | February 17, 2000
ANNAPOLIS - Maryland Gov. Parris Glendening offered a $10 million incentive Thursday to encourage farmers to take environmentally sensitive farmland out of production. Under the federal Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, farmers get paid to protect wetlands and areas around streams and rivers. They can also get reimbursed for the costs of putting up fences and planting buffers next to streams. "It's a very attractive thing," said Elmer Weibley, district manager for the Washington County Soil Conservation District.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | April 29, 2004
waynesboro@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, PA. - An aerial view of a proposed bypass around Waynesboro being considered by the Washington Township Supervisors shows that much of the route would pass through what is now open farmland. Members of the newly appointed committee working on a proposed impact fee ordinance that would charge developers a fee were shown the map Wednesday night. Impact fees paid by developers could cover the cost of building about 4 miles of the nearly 5-mile relief route.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|