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NEWS
August 20, 1999
By DON AINES / Staff Writer, Chambersburg photo: DON AINES WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Three undersized apples from one of Lee Showalter's trees fit easily in U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum's hand, illustrating the bleak situation many farmers in this region face heading into the harvest. [cont. from news page ] "Loans are not the answer. It has to be grants," said Guy Donaldson, an Adams County orchardist and president of the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau.
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NEWS
July 31, 1997
By DAVE McMILLION Staff Writer Silver plastic confuses aphids, blue plastic increases squash yields and red plastic boosts tomatoes. Agriculture experts are not recommending that farmers turn their fields into a rainbow of colors, but they have observed that placing certain colored plastic on the ground around vegetable and fruit plants results in better production. The concept was discussed Wednesday at the Western Maryland Ag Field Day, an annual conference that bring farmers, growers and the public up to date on the latest developments in agriculture.
NEWS
November 10, 1997
Farmers seen as scapegoats for Pfiesteria By GUY FLETCHER Staff Writer A Maryland commission addressing the state's highly publicized Pfiesteria problem is raising concern among some farmers and lawmakers who feel agricultural runoff is being hastily targeted as the culprit in the outbreaks that killed thousands of fish and left dozens of people ill over the summer. "I hope we're not going off half-cocked," said Gerald Ditto, a Clear Spring hog farmer and president of the Washington County Farm Bureau.
NEWS
June 4, 2003
As if weathering the recent drought and getting low prices for the crops they produce weren't bad enough, about 1,000 of Maryland's family farmers took another blow recently when CareFirst insurance cancelled policies held through state farm bureaus for 20 years. If the state and its elected officials are serious about preserving family farms, they will find a way to help farmers get the coverage they need to stay in business. Some state lawmakers have already weighed in, caling CareFirst's decision "outrageous.
NEWS
By BRYN MICKLE | August 9, 1999
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - West Virginia's "rainy day fund" could provide about $5 million in relief to farmers hit hard by the state's severe drought, state Del. John Doyle, D-Jefferson, said. [cont. from news page ] West Virginia Gov. Cecil Underwood has asked for a special session of the state Legislature in which he is expected to ask lawmakers to approve a financial package to aid struggling farmers. "The figure I'm hearing is about $5 million of the $75 million in the state's emergency fund," Doyle said.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | September 23, 2002
andrear@herald-mail.com After fighting unsuccessfully against tighter land-use guidelines, at least one segment of Washington County's farm community has reversed itself and is asking the County Commissioners to temporarily prohibit farmers from carving their land into building lots. Several members of the county's Agricultural Land Preservation Advisory Board said they believe a moratorium is needed primarily to defuse "pressure to sell in haste in a climate that is raging with high land values and unrestrained development" until the county formally adopts new zoning laws associated with the revised comprehensive plan.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | June 19, 2000
Donald Houser was so excited about his corn crop this spring that he had his picture taken surrounded by the 48-inch-high lush green stalks at his Hagerstown-area farm. cont. from front page For the first time in three years, Houser and other Hagerstown-area farmers had an early growing season to celebrate. There were no signs of the drought that has plagued farmers for two straight seasons. No late freezes, no major hail or windstorms. When spring officially ends tonight at 9:49 p.m., weather observers won't have much to report about the season.
NEWS
February 17, 2009
Today's economy has encouraged many residents to become more conservative with their finances. In order to stretch each dollar, most must change certain aspects of their lifestyles. The Franklin County Conservation District will host a session Tuesday, March 17, designed to assist the farming community in making more efficient management choices. The workshop will focus on utilizing economical methods of no-till systems, cover crops and nutrient management on farming operations.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | January 14, 1999
McCONNELLSBURG, Pa. - In three generations of farming, Gary Decker has never known the spring on his family's Licking Creek Township farm to go dry. Not until this winter. [cont. from front page ] Decker's spring and a well recently ran dry, leaving him with one well to provide water for 125 beef cattle and his family. For two weeks, the household has been conserving water to get by, said Decker, 44, who is a Fulton County Commissioner. "You can't tell the cows to cut back any. They're going to drink as normal," Decker said Wednesday.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
Weis Markets recently announced the rollout of its annual Your Neighbors, Our Farmers local produce program. The campaign promotes the quality and longevity of Weis Markets' local produce program and highlights the contributions of 13 farmers and their families who supply Weis Markets' stores with produce. “We were local before local was cool,” said Kurt Schertle, executive vice president of sales and merchandising for Weis Markets. “Although this is the peak season for buying local produce, we are year-round customers of locally sourced agricultural products, including milk, eggs, pork, beef and poultry.
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