Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsFarm Service Agency
IN THE NEWS

Farm Service Agency

NEWS
by DON AINES | May 5, 2004
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - The cost of modernizing Franklin County's old poor house may be a lot more expensive than anticipated. The Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday opened five bids on four contracts to upgrade Building 2, a three-story stone structure on Franklin Farm Lane that Commissioner Cheryl Plummer said dates back to 1814. The low-end figure for the bids is $843,373. The consulting engineers to the county estimated the project should cost about $500,000, according to Lee Zeger of Dennis E. Black Engineering Inc. of Chambersburg.
Advertisement
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | June 15, 2003
julieg@herald-mail.com Dairy farmers are accustomed to milk prices dropping up and down for a few months, but who could predict the latest drop was going to last nearly 18 months and counting? Milk prices have been so low it cost dairy farmers more money to produce a gallon of milk than they can make on that gallon so farmers are having to dip into their savings and tighten farming operations, some local farmers and extension agents said. "People realize there's no light at the end of the tunnel," said David Herbst, of Misty Meadow Farm in Ringgold.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | June 15, 2003
andrear@herald-mail.com WILLIAMSPORT - Like four generations of Wiles women before her, youngster Rachel Wiles does her part to make her family's dairy farm successful. At 7, she's already responsible for feeding and watering the farm's calves - and recently helped deliver her first bovine baby, says Rachel's mother, Becky Wiles. Rachel also has watched her mother juggle her work on Futuraland 2020 Holsteins Farm with her duties as a wife and mother - an experience Becky Wiles hopes will shape her daughter into both a nurturing and self-sufficient woman, she says.
NEWS
BY LAURA ERNDE | March 21, 2002
ANNAPOLIS - A Senate panel killed legislation that would delay and streamline new farm runoff regulations, but farmers hope it's not too late to resurrect the bill in the House. Most of the time, legislation killed in one chamber also dies in the other. But Valerie Connelly, lobbyist for the Maryland Farm Bureau, said she hopes the House will be able to craft some compromise legislation. "We want to make it possible for everyone to comply," she said. Don Schwartz, Maryland Cooperative Extension agent for Washington County, said unless the legislature cuts some of the red tape, the nutrient management regulations won't do what environmentalists intended when they pressed for the law in 1998.
NEWS
BY LAURA ERNDE | March 6, 2002
ANNAPOLIS - Fewer farmers are filing plans to minimize fertilizer runoff now that the state has made it mandatory, an administration official told lawmakers Tuesday. Four years ago, when nutrient management plans were still voluntary, 1.3 million acres of farmland were covered, Joseph Bryce, the governor's legislative liaison, told a state Senate committee Tuesday. By the time a Dec. 31 deadline for the plans rolled around, 1.1 million acres of farmland were either enrolled in the program or were in the process of being enrolled, he said.
NEWS
January 28, 2002
Farmers hope for legislative changes By LAURA ERNDE laurae@herald-mail.com Ringgold farmer David Herbst has been doing for more than a decade what the state is forcing all its farmers to do - figuring out the ideal amount of fertilizer to use on his crops. Too little and Herbst won't have a good harvest. Too much and he risks polluting the environment. Herbst doesn't have a problem with a nutrient management plan, but he and many other farmers want to cut down on the mountain of paperwork that the state government now requires.
NEWS
November 2, 2000
Ag Center drive set to kick off By STACEY DANZUSO / Staff Writer, Chambersburg CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - In an attempt to create "one-stop shopping" for local residents, a $2.5 million capital campaign has begun to establish the Franklin County Agricultural Center. The center would bring under one roof as many as five agricultural-centered 0agencies, including the Penn State Cooperative Extension offices, the Franklin County Conservation District and likely the Franklin County Farm Bureau, the Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Farm Service Agency.
NEWS
March 11, 2000
Briefly Farmers eligible for drought grants WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., announced that farmers whose grazing pastures were damaged as a result of last year's drought will be eligible for grants to re-seed the land. Byrd helped secure $40 million for the revegetation grants. The USDA will accept applications for the Pasture Recovery Program between March 20 and at least April 14, according to a press release from Byrd's office. The maximum farmers will be eligible for is $2,500, Byrd said.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | September 21, 1999
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - About a dozen Berkeley County farmers who suffered crop losses due to this summer's drought got some hay to tide them over Tuesday thanks to a local manufacturer and some Wisconsin farmers. [cont. from front page ] A train carrying 100 tons of hay rolled up to a delivery dock at the Quad/Graphics printing plant Tuesday afternoon. Using forklifts, plant workers lifted the bales from the train cars and loaded them onto trucks and trailers for farmers.
NEWS
By ANDREA ROWLAND | September 15, 1999
The 1999 drought prompted nearly 70 Washington County farmers to apply for state aid to plant fall grain crops this year, according to the state Department of Agriculture. [cont. from front page ] The $3 million statewide drought emergency program, initiated by Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening, reimburses farmers for planting cover crops and provides livestock feed. The use of fertilizer is restricted under the program to limit the amount of runoff. The cover crop program won't turn things around for farmers whose drought-related losses are about $100 million statewide, but it will help, said Washington County Agricultural Extension Agent Donald Schwartz.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|