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Farm Service Agency

NEWS
By ERIN HEATH | July 2, 1999
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Members of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Drought Advisory Committee will tour farms in the Martinsburg area Tuesday to assess damage caused by the recent drought. Agriculture Commissioner Gus R. Douglass organized the tour after Gov. Cecil Underwood declared an Agricultural State of Emergency on June 28. The drought came as a result of months of dry weather, said Bill Bissett, a spokesman for the West Virginia Department of Agriculture. "We've had numerous complaints throughout the state about farmers having to truck water out to their farms to feed their livestock," he said.
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OBITUARIES
July 5, 2011
Margaret Ann Hartman, 53, of Brandywine, W.Va., passed away Saturday, July 2, 2011, at Colonial Beach, Va., as the result of a boating accident. She was born in Martinsburg, W.Va., on Nov. 1, 1957, the daughter of Conrad Edward and Barbara Ruppenthal Beard of Hagerstown, Md. On Sept. 28, 1991, Margaret married Lyle Wilson Hartman, who survives in Brandywine. She was a 1975 graduate of North Hagerstown High School and was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Franklin, W.Va.
NEWS
BY LAURA ERNDE | March 21, 2002
ANNAPOLIS - A Senate panel killed legislation that would delay and streamline new farm runoff regulations, but farmers hope it's not too late to resurrect the bill in the House. Most of the time, legislation killed in one chamber also dies in the other. But Valerie Connelly, lobbyist for the Maryland Farm Bureau, said she hopes the House will be able to craft some compromise legislation. "We want to make it possible for everyone to comply," she said. Don Schwartz, Maryland Cooperative Extension agent for Washington County, said unless the legislature cuts some of the red tape, the nutrient management regulations won't do what environmentalists intended when they pressed for the law in 1998.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | September 21, 1999
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - About a dozen Berkeley County farmers who suffered crop losses due to this summer's drought got some hay to tide them over Tuesday thanks to a local manufacturer and some Wisconsin farmers. [cont. from front page ] A train carrying 100 tons of hay rolled up to a delivery dock at the Quad/Graphics printing plant Tuesday afternoon. Using forklifts, plant workers lifted the bales from the train cars and loaded them onto trucks and trailers for farmers.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | August 25, 1999
Already hit hard by a year-long drought and low market prices, some Washington County farmers say programs set up to help them, such as one that provides government loans, don't offer much relief. Jim Harp, 52, of Paradise Church Road, has over the years borrowed several hundred thousand dollars through four different emergency loans available because of droughts. "You just get in so deep to the government with the emergency loan that you can't ever pay it back," said Harp, who has paid off one of the loans.
NEWS
January 28, 2002
Farmers hope for legislative changes By LAURA ERNDE laurae@herald-mail.com Ringgold farmer David Herbst has been doing for more than a decade what the state is forcing all its farmers to do - figuring out the ideal amount of fertilizer to use on his crops. Too little and Herbst won't have a good harvest. Too much and he risks polluting the environment. Herbst doesn't have a problem with a nutrient management plan, but he and many other farmers want to cut down on the mountain of paperwork that the state government now requires.
NEWS
November 2, 2000
Ag Center drive set to kick off By STACEY DANZUSO / Staff Writer, Chambersburg CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - In an attempt to create "one-stop shopping" for local residents, a $2.5 million capital campaign has begun to establish the Franklin County Agricultural Center. The center would bring under one roof as many as five agricultural-centered 0agencies, including the Penn State Cooperative Extension offices, the Franklin County Conservation District and likely the Franklin County Farm Bureau, the Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Farm Service Agency.
NEWS
by DON AINES | May 5, 2004
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - The cost of modernizing Franklin County's old poor house may be a lot more expensive than anticipated. The Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday opened five bids on four contracts to upgrade Building 2, a three-story stone structure on Franklin Farm Lane that Commissioner Cheryl Plummer said dates back to 1814. The low-end figure for the bids is $843,373. The consulting engineers to the county estimated the project should cost about $500,000, according to Lee Zeger of Dennis E. Black Engineering Inc. of Chambersburg.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | June 15, 2003
andrear@herald-mail.com WILLIAMSPORT - Like four generations of Wiles women before her, youngster Rachel Wiles does her part to make her family's dairy farm successful. At 7, she's already responsible for feeding and watering the farm's calves - and recently helped deliver her first bovine baby, says Rachel's mother, Becky Wiles. Rachel also has watched her mother juggle her work on Futuraland 2020 Holsteins Farm with her duties as a wife and mother - an experience Becky Wiles hopes will shape her daughter into both a nurturing and self-sufficient woman, she says.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | June 15, 2003
julieg@herald-mail.com Dairy farmers are accustomed to milk prices dropping up and down for a few months, but who could predict the latest drop was going to last nearly 18 months and counting? Milk prices have been so low it cost dairy farmers more money to produce a gallon of milk than they can make on that gallon so farmers are having to dip into their savings and tighten farming operations, some local farmers and extension agents said. "People realize there's no light at the end of the tunnel," said David Herbst, of Misty Meadow Farm in Ringgold.
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