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NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | July 10, 2003
scottb@herald-mail.com Al Henneberger, a Smithsburg resident who does genealogical research, said Wednesday that an Internet site available for free to Washington County Free Library patrons will make the work easier and less expensive. People usually would have to pay a subscription fee in order to access all of the information at the HeritageQuest Online pages but as of July 1, it is free to users of Maryland libraries because Maryland Public Libraries paid a fee, Marsha Fuller, Washington County Free Library public relations coordinator, said Wednesday.
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NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | May 5, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - People wanting to trace their family history in the Eastern Panhandle may have a lot of their homework already done for them thanks to Elizabeth Snyder Lowe and Jessie Hunter. The two local women have been instrumental in the publishing of at least eight books relating to genealogy and history in Jefferson, Berkeley and Morgan counties and have been honored at the state level for their work. In February, Lowe and Hunter were two of 55 "history heroes" recognized across West Virginia for their contributions in preserving and promoting local history.
NEWS
March 17, 2003
The American Cancer Society includes the following among symptoms of colorectal cancer: A change in bowel habits, such as diarrhea, constipation or narrowing of the stool, that lasts for more than a few days A feeling that you need to have a bowel movement that is not relieved by doing so Rectal bleeding or blood in the stool Cramping or steady abdominal pain Weakness and fatigue ...
NEWS
by KEVIN CLAPP | February 28, 2003
kevinc@herald-mail.com Claire Pirrello used to be a fan of puzzles, locking jigsaw pieces into place to form pleasant images. Then she stumbled into a generational mystery. She shelved the visual hobby to make room for a more personal pursuit. "It's the ultimate puzzle," the 62-year-old Waynesboro, Pa., resident says of tracing her family's history. "It's a lot of fun, and it's amazing what you can find. " Unlocking Your Past, a three-day event beginning Thursday, March 6, aims to provide information and resources for novice and experienced genealogy researchers interested in preserving family history, while also introducing the wealth of local services with documents to search.
NEWS
September 30, 2002
Age: Most breast cancer diagnoses are in women older than 50. Family History: One or more first-degree relatives - mother, daughter or sister - have had breast cancer No experience of childbirth, or having your first child after age 30. Early onset of menstrual period (before age 12) Late onset of menopause (after age 55) n Obesity Prior history of breast cancer Significant radiation exposure to chest Prior cancer of uterus or ovaries Atypical hyperplasia - abnormal increase in the number of cells - or another pre-malignant condition Multiple breast biopsies Other possible risk factors are use of alcohol, taking birth control pills for many years, and taking post-menopausal estrogen.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | August 7, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com BURNT CABINS, Pa. - Tawnie House knows the horrors of Huntington's disease, an always fatal malady that attacks families because it is passed down through generations. House doesn't have the disease but her great-grandmother died from it, as did her great-grandmother's two sons. House's own mother died from it, as did her mother's brother. House's oldest brother committed suicide when he learned that the gene had passed down to him. "When one member of the family gets it, the whole family owns it," said Mary Louise Franz, 77, of Baltimore.
NEWS
BY KEVIN CLAPP | March 29, 2002
kevinc@herald-mail.com It is a small, narrow, nondescript room off a hallway of Hancock's Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Along one wall are a couple of filing cabinets and a series of microfilm readers. No more than five feet away, along the opposite wall, are three computers and additional filing cabinets. Inside, Genaiavie Stafford sits at a computer. Alternately scrolling across the screen or popping in a new CD, she is trolling the past to unearth branches on her family tree.
NEWS
November 8, 2000
Genealogist helps people reconnect to their roots By ANDREA BROWN-HURLEY / Staff Writer Marsha L. Fuller said she feels like a detective - one who takes a "pit bull approach" to finding dead people. Fuller, of Hagerstown, pieces together clues that she finds everywhere from courthouses to cemeteries to help solve her clients' family history mysteries. In October, Fuller was certified as a genealogical records specialist by the Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG)
NEWS
July 27, 2000
Mail call "Here's a friendly recommendation to everyone who enjoys corn on the cob. Before putting butter and salt on the ear, take a sharp knife and slice each row of kernels from top to bottom. It won't take long, there's only 18 to 20 rows on an average ear of corn. This will make it much easier to eat, the flavor is greatly enhanced and most of the tougher outside of the kernels, which is harder to digest, remains on the ear. " "I'm working on some family history and I'm trying to find the children of Hannah and Orville Shank that lived in Hagerstown.
NEWS
By BRENDAN KIRBY | February 1, 2000
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A Martinsburg man who gunned down a 22-year-old man outside Berkeley Garden Apartments last April gave a brief explanation Tuesday as he pleaded guilty to second-degree murder. Brandon R. Hodges, 18, told Berkeley County Circuit Court Judge Christopher Wilkes that he believed a third person was armed when he shot Kevin Smith on April 7. "I pulled a gun on him. This other guy was reaching for the gun and I shot several times," he said. In exchange for his guilty plea, the charge of first-degree murder was dropped.
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