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NEWS
by Chris Copley | January 2, 2004
chrisc@herald-mail.com The holidays have passed. Aunts, uncles and grandparents (or grandkids) have returned home. Family gatherings have ended. But as relatives disperse, so do opportunities for youngsters to hear stories about family history. Maybe Grandpa drones on about how things were when he was a boy, but he is a link of living history. He may remember the Great Depression, Prohibition, early automobiles, family members who fought in World War II, the family's best cooks, the toys he and his siblings fought over.
NEWS
July 4, 2004
I was standing in church recently when I noticed a family in front of me that was taking up an entire pew. There was a mom and dad, grandma, other children and what appeared to be aunts and uncles and one baby. They were doing the pass the baby thing, trying to get the infant to fall asleep during Mass. What I noticed was that even the family members who weren't rocking the baby still were swaying back and forth after the child left their hands. There was no music playing, they were just rocking.
NEWS
May 20, 1999
Some of her students have thoughts of publishing their personal memoirs, but most want to write them for their children and grandchildren, says Myrtle Haldeman, who teaches "Writing Your Personal Memoirs and Experiences" at Hagerstown Community College's Institute for Learning in Retirement. [cont. from lifestyle ] Haldeman also started to write her memoirs for her family's next generations - five children and 10 grandchildren. But that story now is a book, "Thy Kingdom Come: A Journey of Faith.
NEWS
March 14, 1997
Each day, some 1,700 people are diagnosed with diabetes. It is more common amoung African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders. You are at higher risk if: You are older than 45 You are overweight You do not exercise regularly You have a family history of diabetes You are a woman who has had a baby weighed more than 9 pounds at birth
NEWS
February 15, 2006
WILLIAMSPORT - You know your grandmother's maiden name and the story of how your great-aunt decided to settle in California but when it comes to putting the rest of your family history together, you're stumped. A genealogy seminar will be held at Williamsport Retirement Village in the Twin Oaks Assisted Living building Tuesday, March 14, at 7 p.m. The speaker will be Anne Reed, a Washington County librarian, who will talk about the latest online resources to gather family tree information and trace ancestry.
LIFESTYLE
November 23, 2011
During the holiday season, we often gather with family. Grandpa and Aunt Sue will be telling stories, but often we never take the time to record those family memories. Unfortunately, as the older generation dies, those memories are lost forever. As a way to encourage younger family members to record their family history, we have made a holiday memory book. Cut out the pages and then staple them together for a quick memory book. Or take these pages and use as a template and copy onto thicker paper.
OBITUARIES
March 9, 2012
Harrison Louis Baker, 93, of Williamsport, Md., died Thursday, March 8, 2012 at Homewood Health Care Center in Williamsport. Mr. Baker, son of the late Harrison and Zita Baker, was born in 1918 in Chicago, Ill. He grew up in the Detroit, Mich., area.  He was preceded in death by his wife, Catherine M. (Kay) McGraw Baker, on April 7, 2011. They were married March 1, 1943.  Having graduated from University of Detroit, Mr. Baker's career began in Washington, D.C., working for the U.S. Navy as an electrical engineer during World War II. He then worked for the Bureau of Reclamation, which took him to Ohio, Montana, Wyoming, North and South Dakota, Alaska, and Utah.
NEWS
September 30, 2002
Age: Most breast cancer diagnoses are in women older than 50. Family History: One or more first-degree relatives - mother, daughter or sister - have had breast cancer No experience of childbirth, or having your first child after age 30. Early onset of menstrual period (before age 12) Late onset of menopause (after age 55) n Obesity Prior history of breast cancer Significant radiation exposure to chest Prior cancer of uterus or ovaries Atypical hyperplasia - abnormal increase in the number of cells - or another pre-malignant condition Multiple breast biopsies Other possible risk factors are use of alcohol, taking birth control pills for many years, and taking post-menopausal estrogen.
NEWS
May 3, 2004
The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends the following general schedule for eye exams: Children should be screened for eye disease in their first three months, at 6 months to 1 year old, and age 3 and 5. (The American Optometric Association recommends the first eye exam at age 6 months.) Adults should get a comprehensive medical eye exam once between the ages of 20 and 39, every two to four years between the ages of 40 and 64, and every one or two years after 64. The American Academy of Ophthalmology advises individuals with any of the following risk factors for disease to check with a doctor to determine how often they should have their eyes examined: developmental delay premature birth personal or family history of eye disease African-American heritage previous serious eye injury use of certain medications diseases that affect the whole body, including diabetes and HIV infection - Source: www.aao.
NEWS
June 12, 2010
Q: Are there any resources to help get me started with genealogy? A: Marsha Fuller, certified genealogist, recommends a few titles that give people tips on interviewing family members as well as on basic beginning genealogy. o "The Genealogy Handbook" by Ellen Galford o "Family History 101: A Beginner's Guide to Finding Your Ancestors" by Marcia Yannizze Melnyk o "The Genealogist's Question & Answer Book" by Marcia Yannizze Melnyk o "Organizing & Preserving Your Heirloom Documents" by Katherine Scott Sturdevant o "Digitizing Your Family History: Easy methods for preserving your heirloom documents, photos, home movies, in a digital format" by Rhonda R. McClure Fuller also suggests a few websites to help with helping prepare interview questions for genealogical research: o Genealogy.
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NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | July 14, 2012
Cited as a “wonderful remnant” of Jefferson County's frontier days in an architectural history of early county homes, the Peter Burr House also has the honor of being named the oldest original frame house still standing in West Virginia. The house, built in 1751 by Peter Burr Sr., abuts the industrial park that bears his family name. The house was acquired by the Jefferson County Landmarks Commission in 1998. The house's architectural features are listed in “Uncommon Vernacular,” a book by Shepherdstown, W.Va., author John C. Allen that was published in 2011 describing area homes built between 1735 and 1835.
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OBITUARIES
March 9, 2012
Harrison Louis Baker, 93, of Williamsport, Md., died Thursday, March 8, 2012 at Homewood Health Care Center in Williamsport. Mr. Baker, son of the late Harrison and Zita Baker, was born in 1918 in Chicago, Ill. He grew up in the Detroit, Mich., area.  He was preceded in death by his wife, Catherine M. (Kay) McGraw Baker, on April 7, 2011. They were married March 1, 1943.  Having graduated from University of Detroit, Mr. Baker's career began in Washington, D.C., working for the U.S. Navy as an electrical engineer during World War II. He then worked for the Bureau of Reclamation, which took him to Ohio, Montana, Wyoming, North and South Dakota, Alaska, and Utah.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | March 9, 2012
When Nicole Bachtell talks about living with a rare cancer, don't expect a pity party. She'll have none of that. Instead, she prefers dwelling on the positives: the friends she has made, women who have become like sisters, the love and support of her family. She excitedly talks about a vacation to London and Dublin two years ago, recent concerts she's attended and her participation in a bicycle fundraiser. She goes to work each day, enjoys lunching with friends and driving her "sassy little 2012 Volkswagen Beetle - bright red and fast.
LIFESTYLE
November 23, 2011
During the holiday season, we often gather with family. Grandpa and Aunt Sue will be telling stories, but often we never take the time to record those family memories. Unfortunately, as the older generation dies, those memories are lost forever. As a way to encourage younger family members to record their family history, we have made a holiday memory book. Cut out the pages and then staple them together for a quick memory book. Or take these pages and use as a template and copy onto thicker paper.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | August 1, 2011
Typical excitement surrounded the birth of Kristen and Jason Matthew's first child. There was a nursery to decorate, a name to select and last-minute preparations as they awaited one of the biggest moments in their lives. The moment would be bigger than they ever imagined. Tyler James Matthew was born in the Baltimore area on Aug. 2, 2004 - a week past the due date, resulting in an induced delivery that ended in an emergency Cesarean section. But as Tyler was placed on his mother's chest, she sensed something was wrong, she said.
NEWS
April 7, 2011
The National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick, Md., has announced the release of its latest television work in cooperation with NBC, as well as a program about The Pry House at Antietam National Battlefield to air on the National Geographic Channel. "Who Do you think You Are?" airs today at 8 p.m. on NBC, according to a release from the musuem. On the program, museum Executive Director George Wunderlich is a featured historian working with actress Ashley Judd as she searches for her family history.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2011
The Pry House Field Hospital Museum, off Shepherdstown Pike, in Keedysville, will be featured in  “Civil Warriors” at 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 11, on the National Geographic Channel.  The hospital is one of the locations in the first episode, "Families at War" as National Museum of Civil War Medicine Executive Drrector George Wunderlich explores the challenges and conditions faced by Dr. William Childs. Childs’ great-great-grandson Tim Sawyer discovers with Wunderlich the story of grueling hours and unthinkable conditions his ancestor faced as a Civil War surgeon at the Battle of Antietam.
NEWS
June 12, 2010
Q: Are there any resources to help get me started with genealogy? A: Marsha Fuller, certified genealogist, recommends a few titles that give people tips on interviewing family members as well as on basic beginning genealogy. o "The Genealogy Handbook" by Ellen Galford o "Family History 101: A Beginner's Guide to Finding Your Ancestors" by Marcia Yannizze Melnyk o "The Genealogist's Question & Answer Book" by Marcia Yannizze Melnyk o "Organizing & Preserving Your Heirloom Documents" by Katherine Scott Sturdevant o "Digitizing Your Family History: Easy methods for preserving your heirloom documents, photos, home movies, in a digital format" by Rhonda R. McClure Fuller also suggests a few websites to help with helping prepare interview questions for genealogical research: o Genealogy.
NEWS
November 24, 2009
MAY 26, 1933-NOV. 23, 2009 FREDERICK, Md. - Mrs. Martha Katharine May, 76, of Frederick and formerly of Walkersville, Md., passed away on Nov. 23, 2009, at Glade Valley Nursing Home. She was the beloved wife of Nelson Raymond May, her husband of 58 years. Born May 26, 1933, in Upperville, Va., she was the daughter of the late Wayland Dunaway Edwards and Carrie Bell Hall Edwards. She graduated from Frederick High School, class of 1950, and she married Nelson May on June 3, 1951.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | September 13, 2009
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- For Stacy Spoonhour, Sept. 7 was at once her birthday, Labor Day and, perhaps most importantly, her independence day. Spoonhour joined family for a celebratory picnic that cool, drizzly Monday at Norlo Park. They indulged in hot dogs, baked macaroni and cheese, and sweet potatoes while observing Spoonhour's 29th birthday. The event also marked Spoonhour's second week out of jail. She engaged in conversation with her cousins, and enjoyed watching her daughter and son run around the park.
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