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NEWS
December 3, 1997
Suit filed over alleged misdiagnosis By LISA GRAYBEAL Staff Writer, Chambersburg CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A Chambersburg woman is suing Chambersburg Hospital and one of its doctors, claiming her husband died because he was misdiagnosed. Ralph E. Uglow died Feb. 10 of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, or a bursting blood vessel, the day after he was sent home from the hospital, where he was diagnosed with muscular pain and near-fainting, according to the complaint filed in Franklin County Court.
NEWS
July 23, 1997
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - City police are asking for the public's help to find a 74-year-old Hedgesville, W.Va., man reported missing Tuesday. Charles Ephraim Fitzwater was last seen Monday at a car dealership in Martinsburg, according to city police. He was driving a maroon four-door 1991 Chevrolet Caprice with West Virginia license number 2A4394. "Nothing like this has ever happened before," Fitzwater's wife Dorothy said Tuesday afternoon. She said the family called city and state police and the Berkeley County Sheriff's Department in hopes of finding him alive and well.
OPINION
November 1, 2011
“This is something I haven't seen addressed anywhere, but I was wondering, the debt that New York City is racking up because of the protesters, why shouldn't the unions have to pay that debt, since they're the ones who are supporting this?” - Maugansville “I am a senior citizen. I will not call nor ask to have a pool installed in the senior citizens center. I do not think it necessary to spend $6 to $8 million on a senior citizens clubhouse.” - Hagerstown “I'm glad to see that the senior citizens are finally getting a raise on their Social Security checks, but I've got one question.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | October 26, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The new chief of staff at Western Maryland Hospital Center in Hagerstown said she has wanted to be a doctor since elementary school. "In fourth grade science, I got a microscope," Dr. Monica Stallworth said. "That tipped me over. " Now in her 50s, Stallworth describes herself as an Army brat who modeled her medical career after a respected family physician in Washington, D.C. Stallworth came to Hagerstown in September from the faculty of the Harvard Teaching Hospital in Boston.
NEWS
by ALICIA NOTARIANNI | August 13, 2006
An apple a day keeps the doctor away, the adage goes. But attendance at a health fair Saturday in Hagerstown suggested people prefer a much more active approach to maintaining their health and well-being. More than 400 people went to the Walnut Street Community Health Center between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. for free health screenings and information on community resources. The Community Health Center is a federally qualified health center that provides ongoing health care for people who are uninsured or underinsured, as well as people who are fully insured.
NEWS
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY | March 4, 2000
Hedgesville High School cheerleader Amanda Cummings couldn't cheer for her school's basketball team in its sectional tournament game against Martinsburg High School Friday night. While the game was being played, Amanda, 16, was having surgery to remove a large blood clot that resulted from a freak accident at the team's Wednesday night game against Jefferson High School. But Amanda - whose head stuck a wall and the floor after a Hedgesville player went out of bounds after a loose ball and ran into her - was with the team in spirit, her father said during a telephone interview Saturday.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | October 25, 2007
HAGERSTOWN ? The new chief of staff at Western Maryland Hospital Center in Hagerstown said she has wanted to be a doctor since elementary school. "In fourth grade science, I got a microscope," Dr. Monica Stallworth said. "That tipped me over. " Now in her 50s, Stallworth describes herself as an Army brat who modeled her medical career after a respected family physician in Washington, D.C. Stallworth came to Hagerstown in September from the faculty of the Harvard Teaching Hospital in Boston.
NEWS
By Lloyd Waters | August 31, 2008
I was up and out of the house early the other week and made my way to Borders for a cup of cappuccino, extra dry. At 11:30 a.m. on this particular day, I would be meeting my family doctor, Khalid Waseem, for lunch and a quick chat before my afternoon schedule would beckon me in another direction. As I headed for the plush couch in the corner of the coffee shop to enjoy the java and pass the time until my lunch engagement, I happened to read a New York Times article that suggested that the doctor-patient relationship was "on the rocks.
NEWS
September 21, 1998
By BRENDAN KIRBY / Staff Writer photo: KEVIN G. GILBERT / staff photographer Eleanore Hill was an 18-year-old college freshman when she decided she wanted to become a doctor. She recalls the incident clearly: She was working at a department store when a woman had a seizure in front of her cash register. "I thought, 'Boy, if I were a doctor, I'd know what to do,'" Hill said. --cont. from front page -- Hill, who has worked for the last five years at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center near Martinsburg, W.Va.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | January 2, 2011
She was 11 years old when she started seeing things — insects crawling on her hands, make-believe friends sitting next to her at the dinner table. Her parents attributed it to an active imagination. But as their daughter got older, things got worse. She became upset over run-of-the-mill sounds — ambulance sirens, the ringing of a telephone. And there were mood swings. One minute she was happy, the next she was distraught. After visits with her family doctor, who referred her to specialists, the young girl was diagnosed as bipolar with psychotic features and anxiety disorders.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
November 1, 2011
“This is something I haven't seen addressed anywhere, but I was wondering, the debt that New York City is racking up because of the protesters, why shouldn't the unions have to pay that debt, since they're the ones who are supporting this?” - Maugansville “I am a senior citizen. I will not call nor ask to have a pool installed in the senior citizens center. I do not think it necessary to spend $6 to $8 million on a senior citizens clubhouse.” - Hagerstown “I'm glad to see that the senior citizens are finally getting a raise on their Social Security checks, but I've got one question.
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LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | January 2, 2011
She was 11 years old when she started seeing things — insects crawling on her hands, make-believe friends sitting next to her at the dinner table. Her parents attributed it to an active imagination. But as their daughter got older, things got worse. She became upset over run-of-the-mill sounds — ambulance sirens, the ringing of a telephone. And there were mood swings. One minute she was happy, the next she was distraught. After visits with her family doctor, who referred her to specialists, the young girl was diagnosed as bipolar with psychotic features and anxiety disorders.
NEWS
By Lloyd Waters | August 31, 2008
I was up and out of the house early the other week and made my way to Borders for a cup of cappuccino, extra dry. At 11:30 a.m. on this particular day, I would be meeting my family doctor, Khalid Waseem, for lunch and a quick chat before my afternoon schedule would beckon me in another direction. As I headed for the plush couch in the corner of the coffee shop to enjoy the java and pass the time until my lunch engagement, I happened to read a New York Times article that suggested that the doctor-patient relationship was "on the rocks.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | October 26, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The new chief of staff at Western Maryland Hospital Center in Hagerstown said she has wanted to be a doctor since elementary school. "In fourth grade science, I got a microscope," Dr. Monica Stallworth said. "That tipped me over. " Now in her 50s, Stallworth describes herself as an Army brat who modeled her medical career after a respected family physician in Washington, D.C. Stallworth came to Hagerstown in September from the faculty of the Harvard Teaching Hospital in Boston.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | October 25, 2007
HAGERSTOWN ? The new chief of staff at Western Maryland Hospital Center in Hagerstown said she has wanted to be a doctor since elementary school. "In fourth grade science, I got a microscope," Dr. Monica Stallworth said. "That tipped me over. " Now in her 50s, Stallworth describes herself as an Army brat who modeled her medical career after a respected family physician in Washington, D.C. Stallworth came to Hagerstown in September from the faculty of the Harvard Teaching Hospital in Boston.
NEWS
by ALICIA NOTARIANNI | August 13, 2006
An apple a day keeps the doctor away, the adage goes. But attendance at a health fair Saturday in Hagerstown suggested people prefer a much more active approach to maintaining their health and well-being. More than 400 people went to the Walnut Street Community Health Center between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. for free health screenings and information on community resources. The Community Health Center is a federally qualified health center that provides ongoing health care for people who are uninsured or underinsured, as well as people who are fully insured.
NEWS
July 17, 2006
The Maryland Academy of Family Physicians, a 1,200-member professional medical specialty society headquartered in Baltimore, has named Dr. Matthew A. Hahn of Hancock Family Doctor of the Year for 2006. Hahn received the award on Saturday, July 1, during a ceremony at the organization's annual assembly in Ocean City, Md. Hahn's 2006 Maryland Family Doctor of the Year Award is based on his involvement with patients, community, colleagues and family. Additional judging criteria included his quality of medical care and his credibility as a role model, a healer and a professional in the science and art of medicine.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | May 11, 2000
A Hagerstown doctor doubled a 9-year-old boy's prescription for attention deficit disorder medication without his parent's permission and based solely on a conversation with his teacher, the boy's family alleges. cont. from front page The doctor sent the prescription to the school. The prescription was not filled, but the boy's family is angry about the teacher's intervention in violation of a school policy that says family members must initiate all requests for medications to be given at school.
NEWS
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY | March 4, 2000
Hedgesville High School cheerleader Amanda Cummings couldn't cheer for her school's basketball team in its sectional tournament game against Martinsburg High School Friday night. While the game was being played, Amanda, 16, was having surgery to remove a large blood clot that resulted from a freak accident at the team's Wednesday night game against Jefferson High School. But Amanda - whose head stuck a wall and the floor after a Hedgesville player went out of bounds after a loose ball and ran into her - was with the team in spirit, her father said during a telephone interview Saturday.
NEWS
September 21, 1998
By BRENDAN KIRBY / Staff Writer photo: KEVIN G. GILBERT / staff photographer Eleanore Hill was an 18-year-old college freshman when she decided she wanted to become a doctor. She recalls the incident clearly: She was working at a department store when a woman had a seizure in front of her cash register. "I thought, 'Boy, if I were a doctor, I'd know what to do,'" Hill said. --cont. from front page -- Hill, who has worked for the last five years at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center near Martinsburg, W.Va.
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