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NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | December 15, 2005
waynesboro@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Hoping to keep intact the bracelet of buildings lining Main Street, the Waynesboro Planning Commission is recommending a new zoning designation to "protect the architectural integrity of the downtown," Borough Manager Lloyd Hamberger said Wednesday. The planning commission met earlier this week with members of Main Street Waynesboro Inc. and the Waynesboro Borough Council to go over a plan for a new zoning district that would set apart the downtown business district.
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NEWS
August 18, 1998
By SHEILA HOTCHKIN / Staff Writer photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer [ enlarge ] WILLIAMSPORT - Bonnie Lowman of Williamsport says her family has never voluntarily posted a campaign sign in the yard. Yet 83 signs endorsing 26 candidates found their way onto her Potomac Estates property by 4 a.m. Sunday morning. "Obviously, they want everyone in Potomac Estates to make sure they vote," Lowman said dryly. The unknown pranksters left a campaign sign right at her doorstep, then laid other signs across the shrubbery, walkway and at the entrance to the family's two car garage, Lowman said.
NEWS
By BOB PARASILITI | bobp@herald-mail.com | March 17, 2013
Aaron Miller has three cherished possessions from his junior year at North Hagerstown High School, including a varsity letter for football. He never played a down or snapped on a helmet as the Hubs rolled to a 9-2 record, including a berth in the Maryland Class 3A playoffs. But he was a driving force behind the team's success. During the first week of practice in mid-August, the offensive and defensive lineman was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia and given little chance of survival.  But through a combination of positive thoughts, prayers, treatment, great genetics, a little luck and the drive to play football again, he not only remained involved with the Hubs, but inspired his teammates and an entire school.
NEWS
by MALCOLM GUNN/Wheelbase Communications | January 25, 2004
The sleek, smooth and sophisticated Dodge Charger added sparkle to the mid-sized automobile category while reinforcing Chrysler Corporation's design and performance leadership. When the Charger was officially launched Jan. 1, 1966, Detroit's horsepower race was in full gallop. General Motors, Ford and Chrysler were busy stuffing monstrous V-8s and assorted high-performance parts into intermediate-size cars originally intended to pack low-output six-cylinder engines or modest-output V-8s.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | April 25, 2009
Editor's note: Each Sunday, The Herald-Mail publishes "A Life Remembered. " This continuing series takes a look back -- through the eyes of family, friends, co-workers and others -- at a member of the community who died recently. Today's "A Life Remembered" is about Eileen Elizabeth Moore, who died April 16 at the age of 89. Her obituary was published in the April 18 edition of The Herald-Mail. Growing up in Hagerstown during the Great Depression, Eileen Bair learned early from her father that those who "have" should never forget their responsibility to help those who aren't as fortunate.
NEWS
BY ANDREA ROWLAND | April 11, 2002
andreabh@herald-mail.com Maurice Snyder tells his life story through the black and white photographs and hometown memorabilia at the Williamsport Town Museum. He stops in front of an old photo of a burning schoolhouse and recalls the bravery of the teacher who saved him and his classmates when the school burned to the ground in 1923. The Hotel Ripple at the corner of Conococheague and Salisbury streets burned that same year, Snyder says, six years before Williamsport had its own water supply or fire company.
NEWS
by JASON STEIN /Wheelbase Communications | May 22, 2005
Just look at the man. Doesn't he look like he belongs with a set of tires and wheels? If there was ever a poster boy for the specialty automotive industry - "aftermarket," as they say in the business - Joseph "Corky" Coker might just be your guy. Or, he could be your source for a lot of other things. From his perfectly styled hair to his wraparound mustache, Coker, 50, is a man who looks all business, mainly because he lives it. As the chairman of the Specialty Equipment Market Association - SEMA, as they say in Las Vegas, Nev., where the enormous annual show/convention is held - Coker could sell you a good set of tires for your 1955 Cadillac, teach you how to tie a Boy Scout knot, explain why Nicaraguan orphanages need help or teach you how to fix one of his 70 vintage cars and motorcycles.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | April 6, 2013
Iona Quillen was proud of her roots. She spent a lot of time researching and could trace the family tree beyond her growing-up years in West Virginia, back to the McDonalds in Ireland. She was an only child, but her parents adopted a male cousin after her mother's sister died of tuberculosis. After graduating from Romney (W.Va.) High School in 1952, Iona knew she wanted more. She headed to Washington, D.C., where she earned a business degree at Strayer University. It was in D.C. that she met a Korean War veteran, whom she married.
NEWS
August 23, 2004
Brian Herchenrother has stood behind the front seat of his 1987 Volvo station wagon with his feet on his concrete driveway. He since has had the rust hole patched up and still is driving the wagon, which will go to Canada on a family vacation this summer. "The average person would have said 'Hmph. Time for a new car," said Herchenrother, 48, who lives in Hagerstown's West End. Herchenrother and his wife, Lois, also have a 1982 Volvo sedan and a 1985 Chrysler LeBaron. The Volvo sedan's odometer reads 288,998, but the odometer was replaced after the first 7,000 miles, so the car has 295,998 miles on it, he said.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | November 17, 2012
When Virginia “Ginger” Shirley was diagnosed with ovarian cancer more than two years ago, she had been fighting other medical issues for more than a decade. This time, after surgery, she pulled out a pencil and paper and wrote letters to her husband and three children. Those letters remained in sealed envelopes in the possession of Ginger's sister Edie Cunningham of Greencastle, Pa., who delivered them in person the day before Ginger's funeral. David “Dave” Shirley was married to Ginger for 38 years and marveled at how she always thought of others before herself.
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