Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsFairchild Industries
IN THE NEWS

Fairchild Industries

NEWS
November 19, 2000
After 48 years, barber makes the final cut By SCOTT BUTKI / Staff Writer After 48 years, Lawrence N. Alsip has put down his scissors and given his last $3.75 haircut. continued He ran Alsip's Barber Shop out of his house at 14728 Pennsylvania Ave. in State Line for 48 years, but now Alsip, 76, is retiring. His last haircut was Friday and he won't have to stand to do any more trimming or snipping. Saturday, several customers who have been getting their hair cut regularly by him for more than 30 years came by to thank him for his work and wish him well on a retirement brought on by health problems.
Advertisement
NEWS
by DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | July 17, 2005
daniels@herald-mail.com Aircraft enthusiasts from across the region descended upon Hagers-town Regional Airport Saturday from the ground and sky for Hagers-town Aircraft Services' seventh annual Fly-in. Tracey L. Potter, president of Hagerstown Aircraft Services, said the event is designed to pique interest in aviation and bridge the gap between the community and the airport, particularly following tightened security resulting from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "It's our hope to educate people a-bout airplanes," Potter said.
NEWS
By ANDREA ROWLAND | April 16, 2000
HALFWAY - Allen and Catherine Williams said they know just about everything there is to know about each other. That's because they've been married 70 years. "I know what she likes and what she don't like," said Allen Williams, 89. "I'm sure of that," chuckled his wife, 88. "I know you sleep all the time. " The Williams' were married April 19, 1930, in Frederick, Md. The couple will soon celebrate their 70th wedding anniversary with a small family party in their Halfway home.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | February 5, 2006
marlob@herald-mail.com Late at night after putting her aging parents to bed, Cheryl Durst said she would hear them shouting out "Good night" and "I love you" to each other in the art studio-turned-apartment of her West Virginia home. "The last thing I would do at night was to take out their hearing aids, which meant they would have to talk loud to hear the other," Cheryl said. But that didn't stop them from reaffirming their love of more than 58 years. An only child, Cheryl lost her mother, Alverta Durst, on Jan. 26 at the age of 88, just 15 days after the death of her father, Arthur Durst.
NEWS
April 6, 1997
By BRENDAN KIRBY Staff Writer When Richard W. Poffenberger Sr. joined the Maryland State Police, the starting salary was $2,250 a year. Thirty-seven years later, the pay is much better, and Trooper 1st Class Poffenberger is the state's senior trooper. "The guys tease me that I've been on so long, I'm going to be bronzed," said Poffenberger, who serves out of the Hagerstown barracks. Poffenberger, 62, draws praise from superior officers, who say road patrol troopers are the "backbone" of the force.
NEWS
By DON AINES | May 12, 2010
OXFORD, MD. -- From the early 1960s into the 1980s, Edward G. Uhl was well-known locally as president and later chairman of the board of Fairchild Industries in Hagerstown, but he also was co-inventor of one of the most recognizable pieces of military hardware ever carried into battle by American GIs -- the bazooka. Uhl, who helped revitalize Fairchild and make it a Fortune 500 company by the time of his retirement, died Sunday in Oxford, Md. He was 92. "He was one of the ones always pushing the technology forward," taking projects off the drawing board and turning them into reality, said his stepson, George Hatcher of Easton, Md. After Uhl graduated from Lehigh University in 1940 with a degree in engineering physics, Uhl's career began with the development of the relatively simple bazooka, a shoulder-fired anti-tank weapon, and ended near the time when Fairchild was producing the last of its tank-busting A-10 Thunderbolt II ground-attack aircraft.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | October 15, 2011
Grant Haines survived polio as a baby, was given last rites after contracting meningitis during World War II, recovered from malaria and overcame cancer about 20 years ago. Despite that, he lived to age 95, the same age his mother lived to. "He had about everything you can think of," said Doris Haines, his wife of 57 years. Grant grew up in Winchester, Va., attending Handley High School and graduating from Shenandoah Valley Academy in 1936. Despite a slight limp from a bout with polio, he was athletic and lettered in football and basketball.
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | December 13, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- The way Hagerstown Community College sees it, Washington County stands on the edge of opportunities that could transform its economic future. Very soon, HCC President Guy Altieri said in a new report, the community must begin discussions about education, economic development and 21st-century bioscience-related jobs. "In particular, this paper presents the case for Washington County embracing a unique and timely set of opportunities that would greatly assist in making high skill/high wage bioscience or biotechnology employment a significant part of the local economy," Altieri wrote in the report.
NEWS
July 6, 1999
The Washington County Commissioners are selling a 26.7-acre property at the Hagerstown Regional Airport to Phoenix Color for $152,500. The company will use the property as an entrance for its proposed $100 million book technology park, County Attorney Richard W. Douglas said. As part of the arrangement, Phoenix Color is giving the county 16 acres which it will use for a storm water management pond, Douglas said. The commissioners approved the land sale at a June 29 meeting, but the land will not actually change hands before July 27. All of the land involved is northwest of the main airport runway, he said.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | November 1, 1999
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Sino Swearingen workers are expected to arrive in Martinsburg by the end of the month to begin assembly of tails for the company's new SJ30-2 corporate jet, a company official said Monday. The first three workers at the local plant will make tails for prototypes of the jet, which will be used for FAA certification, said Sino Swearingen spokesman Mike S. Potts. Although the SJ30-2 eventually will be assembled at the Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport south of Martinsburg, the first few tails will be sent to the company's plant in San Antonio, Texas, for assembly of the prototypes, Potts said.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|