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By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | June 30, 2013
Jason Sheets spends a lot of time in his Jefferson Boulevard garage. A machinist by trade, he works full time for Central Precision in Boonsboro, but weekends and evenings are reserved for his own projects and customers. “I can do machining and welding on anything, lawn mowers, engines, it doesn't matter,” Sheets said. Sheets also uses his skills as a custom car and motorcycle builder. He got his motorcycle license when he was 18. He's been doing work part time out of his shop for about 10 years and recently took a two-week road trip to California with his wife, Jen Sheets, to participate in the Born Free 5 show.
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SPORTS
April 27, 2013
Jared Smith, a 2008 Greencastle-Antrim High School graduate, was selected by the Seattle Seahawks in the seventh round of the NFL Draft as the 241st overall pick Saturday. Smith, a defensive tackle from the University of New Hampshire, started 11 games as senior for the Wildcats last fall. He had 40 tackles, including 26 solo, with a team-high 10 tackles for loss. He had four sacks, forced two fumbles, recovered a fumble, collected four pass breakups and had a team-high three blocked kicks.
NEWS
by Mrs. L.A. Funkhouser | November 24, 2003
To the editor: Since the old question of why we have seperation of the church and the state has once again reared it's ugly head, I feel that it is high time for a mini-history lesson to explain why our Founders felt as they did, and why they set up our nation under such strictures. It all began in the late 1400s in Merry Old England. King Henry VII (House of Tudor) had four children: Arthur, Margaret, Henry and Mary. They were all Catholic, and so was England, for the most part.
NEWS
Washington County Museum of Fine Arts | June 6, 2013
By Elizabeth Johns Special to The Herald-Mail   “New England Afternoon” radiates the bright yellows and greens of summer. A dark, sinuous creek leads the viewer into the landscape through a foreground dotted with livestock. Blue-tinged mountains in the far distance, a church steeple in the background and a sky filled with scudding clouds - typical New England characteristics - give the scene its sweeping scale. Willard Metcalf's high point of view and the nearly square canvas (popular at the time)
NEWS
By ROBERT KELLER / Pulse Correspondent | October 30, 2007
With almost half the season of football over, things begin to heat up. Teams begin to play harder to get into the playoffs. For others, it's just for pride. There are only nine weeks before the post-season and the unbeaten and winless are still out there. The best game this week was Jacksonville at Tampa Bay. The Jaguars came in 4-2 while the Buccaneers came in 4-3. Tampa Bay quarterback Jeff Garcia had not thrown an interception this season until halfway through the second quarter.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | September 5, 2005
waynesboro@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, Pa. - The story of a Bible that ended up in a Waynesboro church is like a walk through English history. Late last year, an anonymous donor gave a Geneva Bible that was printed in 1584 to Trinity United Church of Christ. The Bible went on display at the altar for the first time last week, said Christine S. Boardman, interim church pastor. "This is a very, very special Bible for any church," Boardman said. "An anonymous donor came forward from the church community and gave it to us. It was a special gift to the church for Christmas.
NEWS
BY RICHARD F. BELISLE | April 1, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com Sunday afternoon's concert at the Shepherdstown Chamber Music Series will feature the principal players from the Loudoun (Va.) Symphony Orchestra performing compositions by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Last month's concert featured jazz played by students from the Duke Ellington School for the Arts in Washington, D.C. The monthly series, which began in September, was conceived by Brian and Sylvia Ellsworth of Shepherdstown. A French horn player, Brian Ellsworth gives lessons and repairs musical instruments in a shop at 132 W. German St. Sylvia Ellsworth runs Ellsworth Catering in Shepherdstown and manages the Shepherdstown Train Station, a community center where the chamber concerts are held on the last Sunday of each month.
NEWS
March 10, 2009
JULY 27, 1914-MARCH 6, 2009 DUNDALK, Md. - Joseph Resh Hoffman Sr., 94, of Dundalk, and formerly of Great Cacapon, W.Va., died Friday, March 6, 2009, at the Veterans Affairs Rehab & Extended Care Center in Baltimore. Born July 27, 1914, in Parkton, Md., he was the son of the late William L. and Annie F. Pergoy Hoffman. His wife, Mildred Grace Light Hoffman, died July 22, 1991. He was a graduate of Sparks (Md.) High School. He retired after 42 years of service as a machine shop manager with Black & Decker in Baltimore and Hampstead, Md. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He was a Methodist.
NEWS
December 7, 1999
How did Accident, Md., get its name? By accident, of course. Surveyors were sent out on separate expeditions for Lord Baltimore and William Penn after the King of England made them land grants in the New World, said Accident Town Clerk Ruth Ann Hahn. Instructed to survey the best farmland so many miles west of Baltimore, both surveyors ended up marking the same oak tree, leading the area to be dubbed "accidental tract," Hahn said. By about 1800, the area, also called Flowery Vale in the early days of settlement, was being called Accident, she said.
NEWS
October 14, 2009
The local Pegasus Radio Control Airplane Club in Hagerstown will host the End of Season Contest for the Eastern Soaring League. The event will begin Saturday at 9 a.m. and end at mid-afternoon Sunday at Pegasus Field off Old Forge Road in Hagerstown. Approximately 30 pilots from as far as New England and the Carolinas have signed up for the competition. The sailplanes they will be flying are handmade, high performance gliders. The planes are constructed using a composite of carbon fiber, Kevlar and fiberglass.
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