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Employee Benefits

NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | April 12, 2006
WILLIAMSPORT - The town changed its employee benefits program in two ways on Monday. Acting on a recommendation by James R. Castle, the acting clerk/treasurer, the Williamsport Town Council voted unanimously to change the date when employees are compensated for banked vacation and sick time. The town will compensate employees on the anniversary of the dates they were hired instead of at the end of the fiscal year. In addition, employees for the first time will be able to carry over up to 80 hours of vacation and sick time.
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NEWS
April 8, 2010
ANNAPOLIS (AP) -- A panel of Maryland lawmakers has decided to create a commission to study how to address rising pension costs for state employees. A conference committee wrapped up work on reconciling differences made to Gov. Martin O'Malley's $13.2 billion operating budget on Thursday. They decided to form the commission instead of going along with a Senate plan that would have shifted some teacher pension costs to counties beginning in fiscal year 2012. The panel also restored the full $20 million O'Malley set aside for a fund to help clean up pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. The committee also decided against ending the state's legislative scholarship program, an idea backed by the House of Delegates.
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | April 30, 2013
With health care costs on the rise, Washington County employees will be paying about 10 percent more on average for their share, starting July 1, county officials said Tuesday. The county Board of Commissioners unanimously approved proposed health benefit changes for fiscal year 2013-14, which will result in a typical increase of $12.53 per month, or a little more than $6 per paycheck, according to Stephanie Stone, the county's Director of Health and Human Services. “I don't think we have much choice but to raise it,” Commissioner William B. McKinley said.
NEWS
May 13, 2007
The price to send a first-class letter will increase to 41 cents on Monday. David Partenheimer, a spokesman with the U.S. Postal Service, said postage is increased to help adjust for inflation, and typically covers the postal service's operating expenses, such as the costs associated with fuel and employee benefits. Partenheimer said the USPS introduced the Forever stamp last month. The stamp can be purchased for 41 cents, and retains its first-class value regardless of future postage rate increases, he said.
NEWS
May 14, 2007
The price to send a first-class letter will increase to 41 cents today. David Partenheimer, a spokesman with the U.S. Postal Service, said postage increases help adjust for inflation and typically cover the postal service's operating expenses, like costs associated with fuel and employee benefits. Partenheimer said the USPS introduced the Forever stamp last month. The stamp can be purchased for 41 cents, and it retains its first-class value regardless of future postage rate increases, he said.
NEWS
March 17, 2004
Following are some highlights of the Washington County Public Schools' proposed $158.3 million general fund operating budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1: $56.6 million for classroom instructional programs $30.3 million for employee benefits program $13.1 million for facilities operations programs $10.2 million for special education programs within the school system $9.1 million for school...
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | March 27, 2004
shappell@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - A Hagerstown-based farm supply company has agreed under a consent judgment obtained by the U.S. Department of Labor to pay more than $100,000 to the company's profit-sharing plan. The department said the company failed to make mandatory contributions to its employee pension plan more than a decade ago. Paramount Feed & Supply Inc., of 19310 Longmeadow Road, agreed under the March 19 consent judgment to restore $113,337 to the plan, according to a Labor Department news release.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | December 17, 2012
The Washington Township (Pa.) Supervisors on Monday approved a property tax increase some board members say will better prepare the municipality for the future. The 2-mill increase, which supports $4.5 million in general fund spending, will mean about a $40 increase for the average tax parcel, township officials said. A mill represents $1 of every $1,000 assessed property value. Each mill generates about $129,000 in revenue for the township, which will now have an overall tax rate of 6.4 mills.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | November 15, 2007
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Residents of Washington Township, Pa., are facing another year without a property tax increase. The township supervisors have seen early drafts of the budget. They are scheduled to receive revisions in the next week, accept public comment Dec. 3 and adopt the budget Dec. 17. The early version, which included all requests from department leaders, included $4.8 million in expenditures, a 9 percent increase over the 2007 budget, Township Manager Mike Christopher said.
NEWS
January 29, 2006
Bowers Insurance of Hagerstown recently unveiled its "new-look" Web site dedicated to answering insurance questions for both individuals and businesses while offering information about insurance topics. "The insurance market has grown so complex that people are no longer sure where to turn for answers," said Jeff Bowers, vice president and co-owner of Bowers Insurance. "Our Web site will serve as a resource for people who have questions and concerns about insurance issues. It will help them find their answers as they try to obtain the insurance they need.
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