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Eminent Domain

NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | April 10, 2003
waynesboro@herald-mail.com The owners of a 78-acre working farm that has been in the same family since 1816 say they will fight an attempt to take by eminent domain the land that lies in the path of a planned seven-mile bypass around Washington Township. The Washington Township Supervisors voted Monday to authorize their attorney to start the legal process to take the 187-year-old Shank Farm owned by Barry G. and Annie R. Pifer of Germantown, Md. "We're going to fight this as best we can," Barry G. Pifer said.
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NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | February 4, 2003
waynesboro@herald-mail.com GREENCASTLE, PA. - Four Greencastle property owners will get official notice this week that they will have to give rights of way through their property for a $1 million storm drain project or face it being taken by eminent domain, the Borough Council ruled Monday night. The project, aimed at eliminating a pond-like problem created during heavy rains on U.S. 11 under a railroad underpass, will require rights of way through nine private properties, Borough Manager Kenneth Myers said.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | August 16, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Arthur Kline and some of his neighbors are gearing up for an eminent domain battle with the Borough of Greencastle to stop a proposed storm water sewer system from coming through their yards. The borough is trying to correct a decades-old flooding problem on U.S. 11 south near the intersection with South Washington Street. During heavy rains, water collects beneath a railroad underpass on U.S. 11 in the borough's south end. In big rains, the storm water can reach three to four feet beneath the underpass, said Borough Manager Kenneth Myers.
NEWS
BY ANDREA ROWLAND | August 14, 2002
andrear@herald-mail.com WILLIAMSPORT - The U.S. Department of the Interior has made it a priority to buy a parcel of Williamsport-owned property on a "willing seller-willing buyer" basis, Bill Spinrad, land resources specialist for the National Park Service, said Tuesday. The Park Service has no intention of acquiring the one-third acre plot north of Riverbottom Park through its power of eminent domain, Spinrad said. "We want to be good neighbors," he said. Town officials on Monday briefly discussed the federal government's power to condemn the land before buying it for fair market value after Town Clerk Bonnie Errico read a letter outlining the town-owned property's importance in the Park Service's draft five-year land protection plan.
NEWS
August 9, 2002
Editor's note - Please be as brief as possible when calling Mail Call, The Daily Mail's reader call-in line. Mail Call is not staffed on weekends or holidays so it is best to call Mail Call during the week. The Mail Call number is 301-791-6236. You are welcome to leave a recorded message on any subject, but some calls will be screened out. Here are some' of the calls we have received lately: "This is Tim from Maugansville. I would like to take this time to thank all the truck drivers who are out on the road every day driving hundreds of miles to bring us all the things we need in life.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | August 4, 2002
andrear@herald-mail.com Some Hagerstown city officials are willing to sacrifice millions of dollars in revenue and force dozens of people from their homes and businesses to keep Washington County Hospital downtown. Others warn that the city can't afford such rich incentives. And while Hagerstown Mayor William M. Breichner and all five members of the City Council believe a new hospital would best serve county residents if located downtown, others in the community disagree.
NEWS
August 2, 2002
If McClure can't stand the heat... To the editor: On July 30 I was reading an article in the paper titled "Some candidates pass on the Suns' pitch. " Many of the candidates feel that it isn't fair to charge them to speak at public forums. They also feel that by attending this event it will give the illusion they support a new stadium. To these comments I say "nonsense!" First of all, elected officials never have a hard time spending taxpayers' money on things they feel are necessary.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | July 30, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com Hagerstown Mayor William M. Breichner is offering to waive about $2.3 million in one-time water and sewer charges for a new hospital, provided it is built downtown, Breichner said Monday. The Hagerstown City Council has not voted on the offer. The incentive will be a factor in the decision about where a hospital would be built, James Hamill, president and chief executive officer of Washington County Health System, the hospital's parent company, said Monday.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | July 10, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com The Hagerstown City Council moved one step closer Tuesday to adopting a resolution to use its power of eminent domain to forcibly take land to help Washington County Hospital move if it goes to a site within city limits. In a meeting with a hospital search committee, the city also offered to give the hospital financial breaks on water, sewer and electricity if it chooses the city site, Mayor William M. Breichner said. The hospital is one of the city's top five customers for water, sewer and electricity, Breichner said.
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