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Eminent Domain

NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | July 10, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com The Hagerstown City Council moved one step closer Tuesday to adopting a resolution to use its power of eminent domain to forcibly take land to help Washington County Hospital move if it goes to a site within city limits. In a meeting with a hospital search committee, the city also offered to give the hospital financial breaks on water, sewer and electricity if it chooses the city site, Mayor William M. Breichner said. The hospital is one of the city's top five customers for water, sewer and electricity, Breichner said.
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NEWS
BY ANDREA ROWLAND | August 14, 2002
andrear@herald-mail.com WILLIAMSPORT - The U.S. Department of the Interior has made it a priority to buy a parcel of Williamsport-owned property on a "willing seller-willing buyer" basis, Bill Spinrad, land resources specialist for the National Park Service, said Tuesday. The Park Service has no intention of acquiring the one-third acre plot north of Riverbottom Park through its power of eminent domain, Spinrad said. "We want to be good neighbors," he said. Town officials on Monday briefly discussed the federal government's power to condemn the land before buying it for fair market value after Town Clerk Bonnie Errico read a letter outlining the town-owned property's importance in the Park Service's draft five-year land protection plan.
NEWS
July 23, 2009
A different take on moon landing Missing mental health records for Virginia Tech gunman found Allegiant Air suspends service Eastern Regional Jail inmate dies Eminent domain could topple man's trees
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | January 17, 2006
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - State Sen. John Unger said he met with Gov. Joe Manchin Monday to discuss developing a three-year pay raise package for West Virginia State Police. Local officials have pushed to increase pay for state employees, particularly those living in the Eastern Panhandle, because of the higher cost of living there. Many state employees have been lured to higher-paying jobs in other states, leaving agencies like the state police scrambling to staff shifts.
NEWS
January 20, 2008
To the editor: The proposed home rule charter fails Washington County landowners. As a member of the charter board, I was concerned about two items the board failed to include. The proposed charter offers county residents no protection from eminent domain abuse and it offers no broader protections for property owners. Eminent domain allows government to take private property for public use, provided government provides just compensation and obeys due process. But as the infamous 2005 Kelo v. New London Supreme Court ruling made clear, government often abuses its eminent domain power, seizing private land and redistributing it to developers.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | May 30, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com Hagerstown City Council members Lewis C. Metzner and Penny May Nigh want the council to consider trying to forcibly take land from the Pangborn Corp. for a parking lot for Pangborn Park. Council members have expressed concern about parking at the park in light of a plan by developers Richard McCleary and David Lyles to build residential units on 6.5 acres next to the park. The site is now an overgrown parking lot. During Tuesday's council meeting, Metz-ner suggested the city consider trying to use its power of eminent domain to obtain some or all of the 3.5 acres for sale by Pangborn Corp.
NEWS
July 26, 2005
The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled that local governments may use eminent domain to take land that isn't generating much tax revenue and turn it over to businesses that will increase the property tax take. Now West Virginia Republicans are taking the lead on measures that would limit the effect of the ruling in that state. A good thing, we say, and something the Mountain State's Democrats should back, in a bipartisan effort to protect property rights. After the June decision, several national news organizations reported that eight states now prevent the use of eminent domain for the purposes of economic development, unless the property in question is blighted.
NEWS
by DON AINES | September 16, 2004
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A Franklin County judge ruled Wednesday in favor of Chambersburg and its municipal authority over whether it can proceed with condemnation proceedings on a radio tower site that has stalled completion of a water tower for almost two years. M. Belmont VerStandig Inc., owner of the tower site, was seeking an injunction to prevent Chambersburg from acquiring its tower site in the Chambers-5 Business Park. The lawsuit was filed in March after the Chambersburg Borough Council authorized the municipal authority to acquire the site by eminent domain, according to Judge Carol Van Horn's ruling.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | July 9, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com One of three proposed sites for a relocated Washington County Hospital is Allegheny Energy's Friendship Technology Park, but Hagerstown's mayor said Monday he is hoping a possible city offer to use its power to forcibly take land will result in the hospital staying within city limits. "I think the hospital committees need to know the city will step forward if need be," Hagerstown Mayor William N. Breichner said. Breichner wants the Hagerstown City Council to sign a resolution offering to use the city's eminent domain power to forcibly take land to help the hospital move, if it chooses the city site.
NEWS
by KATE S. ALEXANDER | September 28, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - As the Borough of Chambersburg moves forward with plans to revitalize 24 blocks surrounding its downtown area, residents at a public meeting Wednesday for its Elm Street Project offered a choral caveat: Don't forget the people. "Don't forget the individual," Eric Bell of Chambersburg said to the Elm Street Advisory Council. "America is built on individuals. " Jack V. Jones, president of Building Our Pride in Chambersburg Inc. (BOPIC), a nonprofit group aligned with the Elm Street Advisory Council, stressed to residents present at Wednesday's meeting that the majority opinion of the individuals would direct the plans drafted by the town.
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