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Elvis Presley

NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | August 12, 2007
Thirty years after his death, is Elvis Presley still king? That depends on whom you ask. For local fans Dottie Stabler and Debbie Lippy, the answer was a resounding yes. But asked who Elvis was, 11-year-old Josh Parsons of Glengary, W.Va., said, "He's a singer. " Josh couldn't say what kind of music Presley sang, but he'd seen a couple of Presley's movies that were "OK. " And 17-year-old Crystal Wageley of Hedgesville, W.Va.? "I don't know anything about him. " But then after hearing a couple friends talk about him, she did remember his hip shake, sideburns and signature "Thank you. Thank you very much.
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NEWS
by ALICIA NOTARIANNI | January 28, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - Let's hope Elvis Presley's pleas to "Love Me Tender" in 1956 were sincere. The roughly 600 people who poured into The Maryland Theatre Saturday night for the Elvis Birthday Tribute concert stood as yet another indication that his followers are still lovin' him tender, lovin' him true and certainly have no intentions of letting him go anytime soon. Brian Sullivan, executive director of The Maryland Theatre, said audience members came to Hagers-town from as far away as Tennessee, Georgia, South Carolina and Florida to see the show.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | January 25, 2007
D.J. Fontana, the Louisiana-born drummer who gave "Jailhouse Rock" its signature hip-swaying thump, has no qualms about accompanying an Elvis tribute artist live on stage. "Elvis would be proud," said Fontana, who was Elvis Presley's drummer in the 1950s and 1960s. "He would say the best thing is when someone sings one of your songs. That's a compliment. " Fontana, 75, is a special guest on "The Elvis Birthday Tribute" tour, which will make its last stop Saturday at The Maryland Theatre in Hagerstown.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | September 8, 2005
kristinw@herald-mail.com Using the memory and legend of Elvis Presley, organizers of the fourth annual Elvis Lives in Hagerstown Music Festival hope to raise monetary support and awareness to bring forward the next generation of performers and musicians. Proceeds from the Elvis Lives event this Saturday, Sept. 10, will go to support the development of the Barbara Ingram School for the Performing Arts, planned for a building along South Potomac Street. The music festival "helps bring attention to this great project," says Tom Riford, spokesman for the event and president of the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | January 20, 2005
andrear@herald-mail.com Props such as lighted pink flamingos, sombreros, outdated radio broadcasting gear, a life-sized Elvis Presley cutout and an exercise bike hint at the humor in store for audiences at the Potomac Playmakers' production of "Radio T.B.S. (Trailer Park Broadcasting Scandals). " The play - which opens at 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 21, at the Women's Club auditorium in downtown Hagerstown - promises "nonstop laughter," director Jeff Wine said. "We've been rehearsing for two months, and we're still laughing.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | September 9, 2004
andrear@herald-mail.com Three "Kings" will help celebrate patriotism and the silver anniversary of Elvis Presley's first musical release during the third annual Elvis Lives in Hagerstown street festival Saturday, Sept. 11. Elvis Lives in Hagerstown on Patriot Day: A Celebration of America will be held from noon to 6 p.m. at the city's central parking lot off Potomac Street. Ticket sale proceeds from the Presley tribute concert, minus event operating costs, will help cover the estimated $4 million needed to renovate the downtown Hagerstown building that has been designated to house the Barbara Ingram School for the Performing Arts, said Tom Riford, president of the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | January 19, 2004
bonnieb@herald-mail.com GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Even diehard Elvis fans are surprised to learn that Elvis was naturally a blond, according to Bonnie Shockey, president of the Allison-Antrim Museum in Greencastle, Pa., which is hosting an exhibit of Elvis Presley memorabilia. An early photo in the exhibit shows The King as a blond. The collection is on loan from a friend of the museum who wishes to remain anonymous, Shockey said. Shockey said she got the idea for the exhibit when State Line resident David King performed a benefit concert of Elvis' music with Elvis' original back-up group, the Jordanaires.
NEWS
by KEVIN CLAPP | November 4, 2002
kevinc@herald-mail.com He's kidding, right? May he have our attention, please? Points for being polite, but c'mon. In action and attitude, he has a stranglehold on the spotlight that is captivating for some, infuriating for others, and as raw and real as the rhymes he spits out with rapid precision. It's Eminem's show. We just listen/watch/respond to it. Do we ever. Next week, the multi-platinum selling rapper takes another step toward multimedia domination when "8 Mile," his film debut, opens nationwide.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | September 9, 2002
Which Elvis was best? The one in the shiny yellow smoking jacket? The one wearing a white jumpsuit and cape? The one in the pale blue shirt and dark slacks? Maybe the one clad entirely in black leather? There was so much Elvis and so much time Saturday, as four impersonators put on a five-hour-plus show in downtown Hagerstown. If that sounds tough to believe - shouldn't they have run out of Elvis Presley music? - consider the odd accomplishment of one of the impersonators, Jamie Aaron Kelley of Boone, Iowa.
NEWS
by KEVIN CLAPP | September 5, 2002
Kevinc@herald-mail.com Elvis had left the building. Suspicious minds might have pointed to a conspiracy, all shook up at the inaugural Elvis festival's cancellation last summer. After all, fans can't help falling in love with the rock 'n' roll icon, their surrender to his dark good looks and charismatic stage presence unconditional. They should never have fretted. The postponement was but a temporary hiccup in bringing the King and his still flaming star to Washington County.
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