Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsElectricity
IN THE NEWS

Electricity

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | July 12, 2011
Electricity bills are on the verge of dropping in Williamsport, Mayor James G. McCleaf II said Monday night. The cost of purchasing electricity from FirstEnergy, formerly Allegheny Energy Supply, will drop about 12 percent, a savings passed to town customers, McCleaf said. The Maryland Public Service Commission must approve the new wholesale rate plan. A hearing is scheduled for Thursday in Baltimore. A "talking points" sheet from which Councilman James C. Kalbfleisch read Monday said the town would have the lowest electric rates in Maryland — 9 percent less than Potomac Edison customers, 36 percent less than Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., and 38 percent less than Pepco.
NEWS
July 2, 2012
After the significant storms last weekend, many areas of the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia and surrounding areas have been left without electricity. Citizens Fire Co. of Charles Town is reminding residents to follow these simple precautions while operating generators:  Generators should be used in well-ventilated locations outside away from all doors, windows and vent openings. Never use a generator in an attached garage, even with the door open. When plugging in appliances, make sure they are plugged directly into the generator or a heavy-duty outdoor-rated extension cord.
NEWS
BY DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | February 27, 2002
The Hagerstown City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved spending $6,500 to join a regional electricity transmission organization that will oversee the flow of electricity across high-voltage wires, City Light Department Manager Terry Weaver said. The cost could raise customers' bills by less than a few cents, if at all, Weaver said. The city will join PJM Interconnection, he said. This service was previously done by Allegheny Energy. But as part of the federal deregulation process, Allegheny Energy is required to join a regional transmission organization, such as PJM, Weaver said.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | February 18, 2004
Electric customers in the City of Hagerstown will soon see an increase in their monthly bills of between 1.67 percent and 3.23 percent over their current charges, City Light Department Manager Mike Spiker said Tuesday. Spiker said one portion of the price charged to customers - the Purchase Power Adjustment - is increasing because the amount of electricity used last year by City Light customers was less than the amount of electricity the department projected would be used last year.
NEWS
April 2, 1997
By BRENDAN KIRBY Staff Writer A pair of sneakers may have saved the life of a Hagerstown roofer when a metal sheet he was carrying touched a power line, sending several thousand volts of electricity through his body and sparking a fire at an apartment building on Broadway. George Caniford, an employee of Tri-State Roofing and Siding Inc., said he was carrying the 12-foot piece of metal edging when a gust of wind knocked him off balance. When the metal touched the power line, several thousand volts of electricity traveled through the metal and his body and set the building on fire at about 1:45 p.m. "It took the metal right from me. As soon as it happened I couldn't feel anything in my hand," he said.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | October 27, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Electricity customers in Hagerstown are expected to save about 8 percent under a new contract extension with Allegheny Energy Supply. The Hagerstown City Council on Tuesday approved the two-year extension, which will take effect June 1, 2011. Under the extension, the rate per megawatt hour (MWh) in Hagerstown will drop to $64.85 from the current rate of $71.89. The roughly 10 percent drop in the rate is not the same as the savings for customers, according to Michael S. Spiker, the city's director of utilities.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 30, 2013
People touring a new facility that converts methane gas into electricity might have been turned off by the dreary weather Tuesday morning, but the microbes making the needed methane loved it. The microbes converting decaying landfill trash into methane function best in moist environments, PPL Renewable Energy President Mike Kroboth explained. The methane they make is now being used to power homes and businesses in the Borough of Chambersburg. A four-mile “extension cord” carries electricity generated at the IESI Blue Ridge Landfill in Greene Township, Pa., to the nearby borough.
NEWS
BY ANDREA ROWLAND | March 13, 2002
About 850 electric customers in Williamsport will soon pay more for electricity as a result of a federal order aimed at streamlining the management of electrical transmission systems. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's order is indirectly linked to the complex issue of state-directed electric deregulation, FERC Spokeswoman Barbara Connors said Tuesday. It's been theorized that deregulation will result in more choice and lower costs for electric customers. Wholesale electric consumers nationwide are buying electricity over greater distances, Connors said.
NEWS
By DON AINES | September 9, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Rising energy costs are not limited to the gas pump and the 10,500 customers of the Chambersburg Electric Department will be reaching deeper into their pockets next year to light, heat and cool their homes, Department Superintendent Richard Hamsher told the Borough Council on Monday. Hamsher, who will retire Feb. 1 after 40 years, including 23 as superintendent, told the council that customers can expect their electric bills to rise about 20 percent over the course of 2009, but not all at once.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | April 13, 2005
The Hagerstown City Council on Tuesday gave preliminary approval to a proposal to contract with a business consulting firm to aid in negotiations to buy electricity. The contract would cost the city up to $134,750, according to city information. The Hagerstown Light Department provides electricity to about 17,000 customers within city limits, but does not generate its own electricity. City Light's electricity is bought through what is known as a wholesale purchased power contract.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 8, 2013
No one was injured Saturday night when a small electrical fire occurred in a mobile home in the 400 block of Pepper Tree Road, off Grade Road, according to emergency service officials. The renters had the power turned off and put the fire out using a garden hose before firefighters arrived, said Lt. Justin Delmotte with Bedington Volunteer Fire Department. The fire was in a light fixture in the dining room ceiling, Delmotte said. Neighbors saw smoke and called 911, he said. Firefighters disconnected power to the home, which will not be habitable again until the power is turned back on, Delmotte said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | August 5, 2013
Several people showed up at a Boonsboro Town Council meeting Monday night to express concerns about the use of “smart meters” to measure electric use in buildings. One of the people who spoke, Mary Schanno, said smart meters emit microwave radiation and is worried that their use is associated with health complications like insomnia and migraine headaches. Although Schanno said she fears the meters are being used throughout the county, a Potomac Edison official said last week that the local provider is not installing smart meters in its Western Maryland service area.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
An electrical panel box caused a fire in the basement of a home on Maple Ridge Road Monday night, according to a spokesman for the Hancock Volunteer Fire Co. The fire was reported about midnight, the spokesman said. Officials with the Red Cross of the Chesapeake Region said they gave financial assistance to a family in the home to help them replace food, clothing and other items that were destroyed in the fire. The Red Cross said they were also helping the family with temporary shelter.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 30, 2013
People touring a new facility that converts methane gas into electricity might have been turned off by the dreary weather Tuesday morning, but the microbes making the needed methane loved it. The microbes converting decaying landfill trash into methane function best in moist environments, PPL Renewable Energy President Mike Kroboth explained. The methane they make is now being used to power homes and businesses in the Borough of Chambersburg. A four-mile “extension cord” carries electricity generated at the IESI Blue Ridge Landfill in Greene Township, Pa., to the nearby borough.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | April 6, 2013
“Anyone who stops learning is old, whether at 20 or 80. Anyone who keeps learning stays young.” - Henry Ford Proving there is truth in the words of America's most famous mechanic, a former mechanic placed first in the most competitive division in Saturday's 2013 Associated Builders & Contractors Skills Competition. “I've got a lot of years on a lot of these people. I'm the oldest person in the class,” Steven Rhyne said. “I was a mechanic for a lot of years,” Rhyne, 58, has worked in the electrical department at Holcim US for the past three years.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
An electrical problem caused a fire that resulted in $45,000 in damages to a wood-frame house Saturday night in Cascade, the Maryland State Fire Marshal's Office said Monday. The fire was reported at 8:46 p.m. at a two-story house at 14627 Pennersville Road, according to a news release from the Fire Marshal's Office. The occupants of the house discovered the fire in an upstairs bedroom, the release says. The fire caused $30,000 in damage to the structure and $15,000 in damages to the contents, according to the release.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | March 27, 2013
The state's Capital Budget bill cleared a crucial step in the House of Delegates on Wednesday when it passed a second reading, and tucked away in it was a provision setting aside $85,000 for the Antietam Fire Company in Hagerstown. The Capital Budget bill, however, did not include any money for the demolition of the former Municipal Electric Light Plant in Hagerstown. Del. John P. Donoghue, D-Washington, who had asked for the fire company money through a bond bill to fund renovations and repairs to the Antietam Fire Company's firehouse, said the money would help Hagerstown residents.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
The Washington County Sheriff's Office is asking for the public's help in finding an electric guitar that was stolen during a burglary that occurred in the Clear Spring area on Dec. 31. A guitar matching the stolen black Fender Squier Strat was sold to Washington Street Pawn Brokers and the shop sold the guitar to an unknown individual on Jan. 11, according to the sheriff's department. The sheriff's department would like to talk to the person who bought the guitar to determine if it is the instrument that was stolen in the burglary, the sheriff's office said.
OPINION
By JONATHAN LESSER | March 21, 2013
With the approval of Maryland's legislature, Gov. Martin O'Malley will soon sign into law new state subsidies to lure power companies to build windmill generators off the coast of Ocean City. The legislation will raise electricity bills, but the added cost is supposed to bring more jobs, cleaner air and, in the words of Gov. O'Malley, “a better, more sustainable future for our children.”  Credit the governor and state lawmakers for such high-minded goals. Unfortunately, the chief “green” benefit from the proposal will be the millions of dollars in subsidies - some explicit and others well-hidden - that will flow to the power companies and their contractors.
NEWS
BY KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | February 26, 2013
Del. John P. Donoghue, D-Washington, has introduced two bond bills in the House seeking $300,000 to demolish the former Municipal Electric Light Plant in the city's east end and another $85,000 to renovate and repair the Antietam Fire Company's fire house on Hagerstown's Potomac Avenue. “For years, it's been an eyesore and an environmental hazard and it's one of the pieces of trying to transform Hagerstown ... so we can start by knocking that down ... and start transforming that area near the stadium,” Donoghue said about the MELP plant.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|