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Electoral College

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NEWS
November 8, 2000
Views are mixed on Electoral College How could Americans vote for a president and still not know, a day later, who won? How could one candidate get more votes and be in danger of losing? Eventually, either George W. Bush or Al Gore will be declared the next president, but it could take days to recount votes and sort out challenges. What exactly happened on Tuesday? Bush, the Republican governor from Texas, and Gore, the Democratic vice president, ended the race in a virtual tie. They received almost the same number of popular votes cast by people in all 50 states - more than 48 million votes each.
NEWS
December 16, 2000
Proposal would change Electoral College in state By SCOTT BUTKI / Staff Writer Del. Chris Shank, R-Washington, has announced plans to try to change the way the Electoral College works in Maryland. Presently all of Maryland's electoral votes go to the presidential candidate who has the majority of the votes statewide. Shank plans to co-sponsor a state legislative bill that would divvy up the state's 10 electoral votes in a way more fair than the present winner-take-all approach, he said.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | February 4, 2008
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Friends and family of Bill and Valorie Dick had been playing the Waynesboro couple's homemade board game for decades before George W. Bush and Al Gore wound up with their presidential ambitions hinging on Florida's electoral votes. "Suddenly, everyone was talking about the electoral college," Bill Dick said. In the years since the 2000 election, the Dicks have obtained a patent for their game and are marketing "The Prez. " They say the game that establishes faux presidential campaigns is educational and entertaining, as well as "inspired by a hanging chad.
NEWS
November 8, 2000
Tri-State residents speak out By SCOTT BUTKI / Staff Writer Many Tri-State residents interviewed Wednesday said the time has come to do away with the Electoral College. It doesn't make sense that candidate George Bush, for example, could win the election with sufficient Electoral College votes even though Al Gore might win the popular vote, several people interviewed said. continued Eliminating the Electoral College would increase voter participation because it would increase the meaning of individual votes, said Pam Clipp of Hagerstown.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | December 3, 2012
Nine states, including Maryland, have joined the National Popular Vote movement to elect presidents by popular vote. Bills to adopt the issue in both houses of the West Virginia Legislature have languished there for more than four years. The movement was the subject of a debate Monday night between W.Va. Del. John Doyle, D-Jefferson, and Patrick Rosenstiel of Minnesota, senior consultant for the National Popular Vote campaign. Apparently the subject was not on the minds of many area voters.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
The Robert C. Byrd Center for Legislative Studies will host a debate on the issue of the national popular vote for president and vice president on Monday at 7 p.m. in the center's auditorium at 213 N. King St. on the campus of Shepherd University. The debate will feature Del. John Doyle of the West Virginia House of Delegates and Patrick Rosenstiel, senior consultant for the 501(c)4 National Popular Vote issue advocacy group. The debate is free and open to the public. During each presidential election the question always arises about whether the Electoral College has outlived its usefulness and that this Constitutional provision should be altered or abolished so that presidents can be elected by the direct popular vote of the people.
NEWS
November 9, 2000
W.Va. elector says he'll vote for Bush By LAURA ERNDE / Staff Writer A Berkeley Springs, W.Va., man who is a member of the elite Electoral College said Thursday he'll cast his vote for George W. Bush. "That's an absolute certainty. We must and will follow the law. The people of West Virginia spoke loudly and clearly," said Charles Trump. The popular vote was 329,709 votes for Bush and 291,088 votes for Al Gore. Trump, the minority leader in West Virginia's House of Delegates, and the state's other four electors, were nominated and elected to serve as electors at the state's Republican Convention in July.
NEWS
April 15, 2007
Editor's note: Each week, The Herald-Mail invites readers to answer poll questions on its Web site, www.herald-mail.com . Readers also may submit comments about the poll question when voting. Each Sunday, a sampling of edited reader comments will run in The Herald-Mail. Last week's poll question was: What do you think of Maryland's approval of a plan to give its electoral votes for president to the winner of the national popular vote instead of the candidate chosen by state voters?
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | April 22, 2007
In a session remarkable for its unremarkability, the General Assembly and the governor made history of sorts when Maryland became the first state to approve a measure that would effectively scrap the electoral college. This is not new ground we should be proud of breaking. Especially in this political climate, a surliness with the electoral college is an easy sell. How different might history and our present circumstances have been had the winner of the popular vote in 2000 - Al Gore - ascended to the Oval Office?
NEWS
By DON AINES | July 23, 2000
Pa. officials say Ridge could help GOP ticket WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Reports out of Washington, D.C., and Austin, Texas, in recent days indicate former Defense Secretary Dick Cheney could be Republican nominee George Bush's choice for vice president, although Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge would likely deliver the state's 23 electoral votes to the GOP in November, according to state legislators from Franklin County. "The polls show Bush would carry Pennsylvania by a narrow margin without Ridge," State Sen. Terry Punt, R-Franklin, said Sunday.
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NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | December 3, 2012
Nine states, including Maryland, have joined the National Popular Vote movement to elect presidents by popular vote. Bills to adopt the issue in both houses of the West Virginia Legislature have languished there for more than four years. The movement was the subject of a debate Monday night between W.Va. Del. John Doyle, D-Jefferson, and Patrick Rosenstiel of Minnesota, senior consultant for the National Popular Vote campaign. Apparently the subject was not on the minds of many area voters.
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NEWS
November 29, 2012
The Robert C. Byrd Center for Legislative Studies will host a debate on the issue of the national popular vote for president and vice president on Monday at 7 p.m. in the center's auditorium at 213 N. King St. on the campus of Shepherd University. The debate will feature Del. John Doyle of the West Virginia House of Delegates and Patrick Rosenstiel, senior consultant for the 501(c)4 National Popular Vote issue advocacy group. The debate is free and open to the public. During each presidential election the question always arises about whether the Electoral College has outlived its usefulness and that this Constitutional provision should be altered or abolished so that presidents can be elected by the direct popular vote of the people.
NEWS
November 5, 2008
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Barack Obama swept to victory as the nation's first black president Tuesday night in an electoral college landslide that overcame racial barriers as old as America itself. "Change has come," he told a jubilant hometown Chicago crowd. The son of a black father from Kenya and a white mother from Kansas, the Democratic senator from Illinois sealed his historic triumph by defeating Republican Sen. John McCain in a string of wins in hard-fought battleground states -- Ohio, Florida, Iowa and more.
NEWS
October 15, 2008
"After checking on this budget crisis here in the state of Maryland, Gov. O'Malley evidently is not an economist and evidently does not have any accountants working for him. The departments where he is going to make the biggest cuts, he should start at the top. We have assistants for assistants, in all kinds of positions, and it's uncalled for. ... So the taxpayers better scrutinize this budget thing. " - Hagerstown "Before the governor cuts the costs of public safety, he should look at what is being spent on the inmates in the institutions.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | February 4, 2008
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Friends and family of Bill and Valorie Dick had been playing the Waynesboro couple's homemade board game for decades before George W. Bush and Al Gore wound up with their presidential ambitions hinging on Florida's electoral votes. "Suddenly, everyone was talking about the electoral college," Bill Dick said. In the years since the 2000 election, the Dicks have obtained a patent for their game and are marketing "The Prez. " They say the game that establishes faux presidential campaigns is educational and entertaining, as well as "inspired by a hanging chad.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | February 3, 2008
WAYNESBORO, PA. -- Friends and family of Bill and Valorie Dick had been playing the Waynesboro couple's homemade board game for decades before George W. Bush and Al Gore wound up with their presidential ambitions hinging on Florida's electoral votes. "Suddenly, everyone was talking about the electoral college," Bill Dick said. In the years since the 2000 election, the Dicks have obtained a patent for their game and are marketing "The Prez. " They say the game that establishes faux presidential campaigns is educational and entertaining, as well as "inspired by a hanging chad.
NEWS
May 19, 2007
State could use Electoral College To the editor: Just a few thoughts arising from the Electoral College change under way in the state of Maryland. I cannot think that this is really happening. But it seems that The Associated Press is correct in saying that under this new law passed by the Democrat-controlled government of our state, Maryland's 10 electoral votes will go not to the person voted for by the majority of Marylanders, but to the winner of the national popular vote.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | April 22, 2007
In a session remarkable for its unremarkability, the General Assembly and the governor made history of sorts when Maryland became the first state to approve a measure that would effectively scrap the electoral college. This is not new ground we should be proud of breaking. Especially in this political climate, a surliness with the electoral college is an easy sell. How different might history and our present circumstances have been had the winner of the popular vote in 2000 - Al Gore - ascended to the Oval Office?
NEWS
April 15, 2007
Editor's note: Each week, The Herald-Mail invites readers to answer poll questions on its Web site, www.herald-mail.com . Readers also may submit comments about the poll question when voting. Each Sunday, a sampling of edited reader comments will run in The Herald-Mail. Last week's poll question was: What do you think of Maryland's approval of a plan to give its electoral votes for president to the winner of the national popular vote instead of the candidate chosen by state voters?
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