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Election Night

NEWS
January 30, 2002
W.Va. House should revisit election bill The West Virginia House this week gutted a package of Senate election reforms on the premise that an election year isn't a good time to change the voting process. However, few of the changes the House rejected would confuse voters, so we have to hope the two houses can work out a compromise. The Senate bill had proposed 14 changes, but the bill left the House Judiciary Committee with just two of those intact. One would allow counties to speed up their changeover to electronic ballot machines, while the other would eliminate a filing fee for write-in candidates.
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NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | May 27, 2009
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- The Franklin County Commissioners office wrapped up five days of counting write-in votes Wednesday afternoon, but said official results would not be released until Thursday. Both Democratic and Republican ballots had many blank spaces this year for voters to write-in the candidate of their choice thanks to the numerous uncontested or single-party races. Chief Deputy Clerk Jean Byers said it took longer than anticipated to count the thousands of write-in votes cast May 19. The Memorial Day holiday and previously scheduled meetings slowed the process, Byers said.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | May 5, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com EASTERN PANHANDLE, W.Va. - West Virginia's primary election process is heading into the final stretch, and the tabulating equipment is ready to go. On Tuesday morning, Jefferson County election officials tested their tabulating equipment during a procedure that took about an hour and a half, said Debbie Pittinger, deputy clerk in the Jefferson County Clerk's Office. In the test, a deck of ballots was fed through a tabulating machine to make sure it was counting accurately, Pittinger said.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | November 8, 2006
The Washington County Sheriff's Department's second-highest ranking officer will be taking over for his boss. Col. Douglas W. Mullendore beat out Republican challenger Rich Poffenberger, a Maryland State Police corporal, in Tuesday's general election. Mullendore's boss, Charles Mades, has been sheriff for 20 years. With all 50 precincts reporting, Mullendore led Poffenberger by 21,533 votes to 14,720, according to unofficial results. According to Washington County Board of Elections figures, 4,037 absentee ballots were distributed, and 3,550 had been returned as of Tuesday evening.
NEWS
BY ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 15, 2002
andrews@herald-mail.com Mildred "Mickey" Myers decisively defeated Mike Rohrer Tuesday to become Smithsburg's next mayor. Myers - who received 269 votes to Rohrer's 57 - was mayor from 1994 to 1998, but lost the next election to Tommy Bowers. Bowers decided not to run again this year. Also Tuesday, Ralph J. Regan and James LaFemina won two open seats on the town council, with both surviving a write-in campaign on behalf of departing Councilman Charlie Slick. Regan received 219 votes and LaFemina had 195. Slick - who received 108 votes - announced in January that he wasn't running again after 14 years on the council.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | November 13, 2000
Florida issues familiar to Tri-State candidates, voters Bob Tabb of Leetown, W.Va., has some idea of what Al Gore and George W. Bush are going through. continued Tabb came within just three votes of ousting incumbent Republican state Del. John Doyle in Jefferson County's May primary. The stakes weren't as high as they are now, with the fate of the presidency hanging on several hundred votes in Florida, but tensions ran high nonetheless. Another similarity is that both elections relied on the use of punch-card ballots.
NEWS
By BILL KOHLER | June 6, 2009
Have you seen the new "Star Trek" movie yet? If not, I highly recommend it. After all, what's not to like? A smokin' hot cast, great special effects, lots of explosions and other loud stuff, a good script and a bunch of cool gadgets and spaceships. As I tried to recover my hearing after the movie, I watched the credits roll and realized how much work goes into a movie behind the scenes. Without the work of the costume director, the characters of Kirk, Spock and Uhura wouldn't look so cool in those clingy Federation shirts.
NEWS
By BILL KOHLER | May 7, 2006
It's important to you, so it's important to us. Sounds simple enough, this phrase of customer service commitment, but it rings hollow for some businesses that ignore the needs and interests of their customers as they head down a slippery slope to losing their business and, at the very least, their customer base. In the news business, we can't afford to ignore our readers, viewers or listeners, or we certainly will lose them. Not only is this a fundamental error of gargantuan proportion, but with the competition for our readers' attention in the new millennium, it would be like cutting off our hands.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | May 12, 2004
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Scott Coyle was ahead in a three-way race for Jefferson County Clerk in the Democratic primary election Tuesday night, according to incomplete, unofficial returns.Coyle had 944 votes, compared to 553 votes for Jeral A. Milton and 308 votes for Stafford H. Koonce, with 20 of 29 precincts reporting. Even though Democrat Gary Kable had dropped out of the race early in the campaign, he received 754 votes, putting him in second place. The winner of the Democratic race will face Republican Jennifer Maghan in the Nov. 2 general election.
NEWS
by DON AINES | March 15, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Almost $800,000 in new election equipment was ordered by the county Tuesday for use in the May 16 primary, but most voters will not notice a difference until they slip the paper ballot into the ballot box. The county is purchasing 78 precinct counters for $390,000 and 75 AutoMARK Voter Assist Terminals for $382,000 that are certified with the state to be in compliance with the federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA), said Deputy Chief Clerk Jean Byers. In the case of the AutoMARK voting machines, the state certification was given Friday, she said, adding that HAVA compliance is mandatory for the upcoming primary.
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