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Education Reform

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OPINION
By DAVID HANLIN | September 4, 2013
My children all attended Washington County Public Schools, and I am very happy with the overall education they received. But, public school may not be for every family. Some opt for private or homeschooling. What is important is that all children get an education that best prepares them to contribute to society and that gives them the best chance for happiness as adults. Traditionally, homeschooling and private schooling are viewed as being distinct from public schooling. However, I suspect these approaches to educating children are likely to become increasingly interconnected as education continues to undergo major reform.  The 2004 report to the National Governors Association (NGA)
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | June 18, 2013
More rigorous Common Core education standards, new assessment tests, and new teacher and principal evaluation systems that begin this school year were among the issues the superintendent of Maryland schools and the head of the state's teachers association discussed Tuesday with local business leaders.  Shortly after Maryland Schools Superintendent Lillian Lowery took office almost a year ago, she began meeting at least monthly with Betty Weller, president of the Maryland State Education Association, they said.
NEWS
January 15, 2012
A Black History Month tribute will take place Sunday, Feb. 5, from 2 to 5 p.m. at Review and Herald Publishing Association, 55 W. Oak Ridge Drive, Hagerstown. The theme is "Education Reform: Shaping Our Future. " The scheduled speakers are Earl Stoner, Fanny Crawford, Johnathan Burrs, Niettie Anderson-Burrs, Dickson Tabi, Dora Rice, Kelly Wright, Jay Kelsh, Loretta Wright, Dewain Esmond, Kevin Watson, Thomas Segar, Yvonne Jenkins and Robert Petties. Music will be provided by Arron Worthy, students from Contemporary School of the Arts and Gallery Inc.'s music program, Kerensa Gray, Hagerstown YMCA Achievers, Lea Jolin, Sandra Ortiz, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Poling, and the Pride Family.
NEWS
April 7, 2010
School board approves contracts The Washington County Board of Education voted Tuesday to approve the following expenditures during a meeting at the Central Office on Commonwealth Avenue in Hagerstown: o $228,500 to perform preventative maintenance and repair service to Washington County Public Schools' automated temperature control systems. The contract, which will cover 47 facilities, was awarded to Control Systems Inc. of Hagerstown. The contract runs from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2011.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | February 13, 2013
Eastern Panhandle lawmakers reacted positively to Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin's State of the State address Wednesday night, but some noted proposals on how he intended to address education reform, prison overcrowding and other issues lacked specifics. “We, of course, haven't seen the details,” said state Sen. Herb Snyder, D-Jefferson, who felt Tomblin presented an aggressive agenda in remarks that were very positive. Snyder said he was left with the impression that Tomblin clearly wants to address prison overcrowding and the recidivist or reoffending rate of individuals this year.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | July 27, 2010
Maryland and Pennsylvania are among 19 finalists for a pot of about $3 billion available through Race to the Top, the Obama Administration's education reform initiative. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced grant finalists during a speech Tuesday at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that was aired on C-SPAN 2. Grant winners from this second round of applications are expected to be announced in September. The education reform initiative requires states that want a portion of the $4.35 billion Race to the Top Fund to submit proposals explaining how they would address four areas: o Turning around low-achieving schools o Adopting standards that prepare students to succeed in college and the workplace in a global economy o Building data systems to measure student growth, helping teachers improve instruction o Recruiting, developing, rewarding and retaining effective teachers and principals If Maryland receives the full $250 million for which it is eligible, Washington County Public Schools could receive $2.8 million in Race to the Top grant money over a four-year period, according to draft estimates from the Maryland Department of Education.
NEWS
November 18, 1998
As Washington County school board members wonder aloud how they'll pay for the projects outlined in a new strategic plan, we suggest that they look at what a Maryland business group is doing around the state to make education reform a reality. The group is the the Maryland Business Rountable for Education, a group of more than 100 businesses that's been working for six years to improve instruction and the quality of students entering the work force. In an interview with The Associated Press, the group's chairman, Raymond A. "Chip" Mason of Legg Mason, Inc., said that 30 years ago it was possible for students to drop out of school and make a decent living in the manufacturing area, even if they didn't have good reading or math skills.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | February 1, 2013
Education reform, substance abuse treatment, related incarceration costs and state budget cuts were among the most heavily discussed issues at the 2013 Legislative Outlook luncheon at the Holiday Inn in Martinsburg. About 150 people turned out for the annual Martinsburg-Berkeley County Chamber of Commerce program, which featured remarks by state Sens. John Unger, D-Berkeley, Craig Blair, R-Berkeley, Herb Snyder, D-Jefferson, the Eastern Panhandle's 10 members in the 100-member House of Delegates and Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin's regional representative, Stephanie Mathias.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | July 12, 2012
Three state legislators faced their constituents to address a number of major issues facing Pennsylvania, including the recently passed $27 billion-plus state budget, education reform, prison overcrowding and cuts to human services. For more than an hour, Sen. John Eichelberger, Rep. Rob Kauffman and Todd Rock, fielded a list of prepared questions from the Franklin County 9/12 Patriots, sponsors of Thursday's event at the Franklin Fire Co. in Chambersburg. The Franklin County 9/12 Patriots was formed in March in response to issues facing local government, the state and country.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | February 5, 2012
Continuing to learn, no matter your age, wisely selecting role models and seizing opportunities were among the advice Tri-State area leaders shared at a black history tribute Sunday afternoon. “But education is expanding your vision beyond what you know today to be true. We would still be stuck in 1964 if there weren't folk, without schooling, without what we consider now formal education, who didn't step up and take the challenge to understand a little more today than they understood yesterday and pass that on to the next generation,” jazz singer Kerensa Gray told the audience at the Review and Herald Publishing Association's auditorium south of Hagerstown.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
By DAVID HANLIN | September 4, 2013
My children all attended Washington County Public Schools, and I am very happy with the overall education they received. But, public school may not be for every family. Some opt for private or homeschooling. What is important is that all children get an education that best prepares them to contribute to society and that gives them the best chance for happiness as adults. Traditionally, homeschooling and private schooling are viewed as being distinct from public schooling. However, I suspect these approaches to educating children are likely to become increasingly interconnected as education continues to undergo major reform.  The 2004 report to the National Governors Association (NGA)
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NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | June 18, 2013
More rigorous Common Core education standards, new assessment tests, and new teacher and principal evaluation systems that begin this school year were among the issues the superintendent of Maryland schools and the head of the state's teachers association discussed Tuesday with local business leaders.  Shortly after Maryland Schools Superintendent Lillian Lowery took office almost a year ago, she began meeting at least monthly with Betty Weller, president of the Maryland State Education Association, they said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | February 13, 2013
Eastern Panhandle lawmakers reacted positively to Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin's State of the State address Wednesday night, but some noted proposals on how he intended to address education reform, prison overcrowding and other issues lacked specifics. “We, of course, haven't seen the details,” said state Sen. Herb Snyder, D-Jefferson, who felt Tomblin presented an aggressive agenda in remarks that were very positive. Snyder said he was left with the impression that Tomblin clearly wants to address prison overcrowding and the recidivist or reoffending rate of individuals this year.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | February 1, 2013
Education reform, substance abuse treatment, related incarceration costs and state budget cuts were among the most heavily discussed issues at the 2013 Legislative Outlook luncheon at the Holiday Inn in Martinsburg. About 150 people turned out for the annual Martinsburg-Berkeley County Chamber of Commerce program, which featured remarks by state Sens. John Unger, D-Berkeley, Craig Blair, R-Berkeley, Herb Snyder, D-Jefferson, the Eastern Panhandle's 10 members in the 100-member House of Delegates and Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin's regional representative, Stephanie Mathias.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | July 12, 2012
Three state legislators faced their constituents to address a number of major issues facing Pennsylvania, including the recently passed $27 billion-plus state budget, education reform, prison overcrowding and cuts to human services. For more than an hour, Sen. John Eichelberger, Rep. Rob Kauffman and Todd Rock, fielded a list of prepared questions from the Franklin County 9/12 Patriots, sponsors of Thursday's event at the Franklin Fire Co. in Chambersburg. The Franklin County 9/12 Patriots was formed in March in response to issues facing local government, the state and country.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | February 5, 2012
Continuing to learn, no matter your age, wisely selecting role models and seizing opportunities were among the advice Tri-State area leaders shared at a black history tribute Sunday afternoon. “But education is expanding your vision beyond what you know today to be true. We would still be stuck in 1964 if there weren't folk, without schooling, without what we consider now formal education, who didn't step up and take the challenge to understand a little more today than they understood yesterday and pass that on to the next generation,” jazz singer Kerensa Gray told the audience at the Review and Herald Publishing Association's auditorium south of Hagerstown.
NEWS
January 15, 2012
A Black History Month tribute will take place Sunday, Feb. 5, from 2 to 5 p.m. at Review and Herald Publishing Association, 55 W. Oak Ridge Drive, Hagerstown. The theme is "Education Reform: Shaping Our Future. " The scheduled speakers are Earl Stoner, Fanny Crawford, Johnathan Burrs, Niettie Anderson-Burrs, Dickson Tabi, Dora Rice, Kelly Wright, Jay Kelsh, Loretta Wright, Dewain Esmond, Kevin Watson, Thomas Segar, Yvonne Jenkins and Robert Petties. Music will be provided by Arron Worthy, students from Contemporary School of the Arts and Gallery Inc.'s music program, Kerensa Gray, Hagerstown YMCA Achievers, Lea Jolin, Sandra Ortiz, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Poling, and the Pride Family.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | July 27, 2010
Maryland and Pennsylvania are among 19 finalists for a pot of about $3 billion available through Race to the Top, the Obama Administration's education reform initiative. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced grant finalists during a speech Tuesday at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., that was aired on C-SPAN 2. Grant winners from this second round of applications are expected to be announced in September. The education reform initiative requires states that want a portion of the $4.35 billion Race to the Top Fund to submit proposals explaining how they would address four areas: o Turning around low-achieving schools o Adopting standards that prepare students to succeed in college and the workplace in a global economy o Building data systems to measure student growth, helping teachers improve instruction o Recruiting, developing, rewarding and retaining effective teachers and principals If Maryland receives the full $250 million for which it is eligible, Washington County Public Schools could receive $2.8 million in Race to the Top grant money over a four-year period, according to draft estimates from the Maryland Department of Education.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | May 22, 2010
o Teachers union against Race to the Top application WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Race to the Top, President Obama's education reform initiative, will mean changes for students and teachers, but Maryland and the county school system already have a head start on some of the initiative's goals, officials said last week. Race to the Top is a $4.35 billion federal grant program that requires states that want to participate, and receive some of that money, to apply by June 1, according to the initiative.
NEWS
April 7, 2010
School board approves contracts The Washington County Board of Education voted Tuesday to approve the following expenditures during a meeting at the Central Office on Commonwealth Avenue in Hagerstown: o $228,500 to perform preventative maintenance and repair service to Washington County Public Schools' automated temperature control systems. The contract, which will cover 47 facilities, was awarded to Control Systems Inc. of Hagerstown. The contract runs from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2011.
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