Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsEd Rendell
IN THE NEWS

Ed Rendell

NEWS
June 13, 2006
Is all the speculation about the possible furlough of thousands of Pennsylvania state workers just talk, or is it a real possibility? Either way, if it does happen it will demonstrate that elected officials aren't above using state employees as political pawns. The Associated Press reported that in the past two weeks about 20,000 state employees received notification that if the legislature and the governor don't agree on a budget, workers could be furloughed. Not only that, but the administration of Gov. Ed Rendell has met with unions to assure them that in the event of a furlough, the state would still pay its share of health-care costs.
Advertisement
NEWS
by DON AINES | March 8, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - March 30 will mark one year since the unexpected death of Magisterial District Judge Larry Meminger, yet no name has been placed in nomination by Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell to fill the vacancy in District 39-3-04. "It's a matter of the governor choosing someone who is qualified and confirmable and he shall do that as soon as he is able," Chuck Ardo, a spokesman for the governor, said Tuesday. Ardo said there is no schedule for submitting a name to the state Senate for confirmation.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | January 12, 2006
McCONNELLSBURG, PA. waynesboro@herald-mail.com Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell announced Wednesday that JLG Industries Inc., a major manufacturing employer in the central part of the state, will receive nearly $4.8 million in grants and assistance to create jobs, expand facilities and increase production. Officials with JLG Industries, a manufacturer of access equipment for construction, said they will use the money to create at least 335 jobs in McConnellsburg and 240 jobs in Shippensburg, Pa. Rendell visited Fulton, Cumberland and Bedford counties Wednesday to describe the financial package that includes $2.25 million through the Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority, an $800,000 Opportunity grant, $250,000 in job training assistance and $1.48 million in job creation tax credits.
NEWS
July 29, 2005
You would think that Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell's decision to hire 120 new state troopers would be an action welcomed by existing members of the state police. Not so, because Rendell also wants to "civilianize" 60 positions, a move opposed by the police union. There's room for negotiation here, if both sides will approach the talks with an open mind. On Wednesday, the governor called a news conference to ask the Pennsylvania State Troopers Association to accept the plan to have civilians do forensic analysis and handle liquor-code enforcement and communications duties.
NEWS
by DON AINES | March 9, 2004
chambersburg@herald-mail.com When Deb Witherspoon first came to Letterkenny Army Depot in 1980, more than 6,000 people worked at the installation. The number of employees is now at about 2,000. Over the years, Witherspoon, president of the National Federation of Federal Employees Local 1442, has seen the Base Realignment and Closure Commission meet four times, the last in 1995. While not all of the job losses at the depot have come through cuts by the BRAC Commission, "We've lost a lot throughout the processes," she said.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | February 4, 2004
waynesboro@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell's plan to hold down taxes by raising fees has one township manager in Franklin County looking at an increase in the money the township pays to get rid of its trash. Among new fees that Rendell outlined Tuesday in his proposed $22.7 billion budget for fiscal 2004-05 is a $5-per-ton increase in what municipalities pay to dispose of solid waste. The money would pay off an $800 million environmental protection bond issue Rendell is proposing.
NEWS
February 3, 2004
Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell will present his $22.7 billion budget for fiscal 2004-05 to state lawmakers today. The budget represents a 6 percent increase in state spending, but the more worrisome aspects would borrow $3 billion to protect the environment and stimulate the state's economy. If those things are worth doing, the governor should make the case for paying for them now, instead of adding to the state's long-term debt. Budget Secretary Michael Mascha told The Associated Press that the cost of borrowing such a large amount of money would require $37 million in interest payments the first year alone.
NEWS
by DON AINES | January 22, 2004
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Having cut hours at three of its libraries last summer because of reduced state funding, the Franklin County Library System is trimming hours again, according to Executive Director Bernice Crouse. The cuts, effective Feb. 1, will mean the Coyle Free Library in Chambersburg will close it doors 30 minutes earlier on weeknights, at 8 p.m. Combined with the cut in Sunday hours made last summer, the weekly hours of operation will be reduced to 62. The Ragged Edge Library in Guilford Township and the Lilian S. Besore Library in Greencastle, Pa., will both be opening later and closing earlier.
NEWS
December 9, 2003
The next time Pennsylvania's schools are shut down, the odds are good that Mother Nature won't be to blame. Instead the culprits will be the state's top elected officials, whose argument over how to fund schools has kept the state from sending out its share of subsidy cash. It's time for the two sides to cut a deal so local schools can stay open. The heart of the dispute is Democratic Gov. Ed Rendell's proposal to end local school systems' heavy dependence on property taxes to fund their operations.
NEWS
November 18, 2003
Everyone in Pennsylvania's state capital agrees that legalizing slot machines would bring much-needed revenue to the state. On just how to do that, there's an argument on every point. As one GOP lawmaker said, without some compromise, the legislature may end up rejecting the whole idea. Democratic Gov. Ed Rendell proposed slot machine legalization in part because his predecessor agreed to transfer half a billion dollars from the state's Rainy Day Fund to avoid raising taxes in an election year.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|