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Economy

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OPINION
By ART CALLAHAM | April 3, 2011
There’s been a lot of talk about the economy lately. Couple that with the role of federal, state and local government, and you have a subject that will usually set anyone’s hair on fire. So, what is the role of government in the economy? On one side, you have conservatives, who believe the government’s role in the economy must be “hands off.” The more conservative in nature, the more and more hands off. Some conservatives beat their chests and shout, “Don’t spend taxpayer money (often expressed as “my money”)
NEWS
By ARNOLD PLATOU | April 24, 2010
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Eric Peifer, Kim Teska and Bob Dooley are seeing something different in the economy this year and it gives them hope. "I think we're finally to the point where people are saying, 'I still have my job, I still have my income ... I feel better. Now's the time to start spending some again," said Peifer, vice president of Burkholder's Inc., a 60-year-old Hagerstown flooring company. Teska, manager of Bast of Boonsboro, which is marking its 173rd year in the furniture business, said she also is seeing a positive shift.
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | arnoldp@herald-mail.com | May 26, 2013
It might not be clear whether the economy is improving, but what is clear to Norine T. Dagliano is that many workers and unemployed people suddenly seem hopeful. “Since the beginning of this year,” said professional Hagerstown job resumé writer Dagliano, “I have just seen a tremendous increase in business, of employed people and unemployed people who are feeling enough hope in the economy now, they're ready to pursue other opportunities.” There has been a surge this year in the number of temporary and temporary-to-permanent jobs that area companies are offering, a jobs specialist said, referring to jobs that last only a few weeks and those that offer a few weeks' employment with the potential of becoming more permanent.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | November 14, 2003
julieg@herald-mail.com Two years ago, the U.S. economy beat expectations by emerging from a national recession just two months after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. How did that happen? "What do you do when you feel down and out? You shop," Anirban Basu told about 170 local business people attending the Washington County Economic Summit at Fountain Head Country Club on Thursday night. That's just a sampling of Basu's presentation - a mixture of 53 slides of economic data and graphics with some standup comedy mixed in. As chief executive officer of Optimal Solutions Group in Baltimore, Basu said he does economic and policy analyses for businesses; nonprofits; and local, state and federal government agencies.
NEWS
March 19, 2001
Area residents ponder economy By LAURA ERNDE laurae@herald-mail.com As the stock market took a nosedive this week, President Bush continued to sell his tax cut plan as a response to a general economic slowdown. The stumbling economy, combined with a recent increase in energy prices and a local rash of layoffs, has many Tri-State area residents thinking about their future. In an informal survey Saturday, some said they are beginning to feel the effects.
NEWS
By CHAD SMITH | May 12, 2008
With gas prices on the rise, the cost of food climbing, and the tax man raiding our hard-earned money, is part of the solution as simple as burning more fat? Is there a connection between patriotism and fitness? Last week, MSN.com explored the economic effects of a 100-percent fit American population in the article "What If No One Were Fat?" The writer consulted economic experts and health experts and came up with some pretty interesting figures. What really caught my attention was this: Feeding, clothing and transporting larger, heavier people costs money.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | January 21, 2009
Editor's note: This is the first of two stories focusing on the ups and downs of the struggling economy and its impact on Berkeley County. Click here to read the second story. MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- Battered by a housing market crash that is part of a national recession, Berkeley County's economy isn't knocked out cold, according to business leaders. "It's not completely stopped," said Tina Combs, executive director of the Chamber of Commerce of Martinsburg and Berkeley County.
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | arnoldp@herald-mail.com | April 7, 2013
The nation's ongoing economic doldrums, mixed with generational differences, have hit rock maple as well as blond furniture hard, and all but the finest antiques have suffered. But at area auctions, the venerable box lots - random cardboard box assortments of such things as old egg beaters, bottle openers, calendars and road maps - still are selling well. Often, the buyers are people who hope to resell the individual items for a profit, auctioneers said. “The box lots, the generic type of household items, things you would see at flea markets, that market has grown stronger,” said auctioneer John F. Kohler Jr., who owns Gateway Gallery Auction in Chambersburg, Pa. “I attribute that to more people are using the yard sale, flea market venue or Craigslist to garner more income,” Kohler said.
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | May 8, 2010
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Jon Snavely is seeing customers buying lawn benches and arbors that they walked past last year. Kurt Lovell is laying in brick paths that interested few homeowners last year. And Ollie "Chuck" Ball is planting roses and a red cedar in the backyard of his Hagerstown home and putting a little white picket fence around two new bushes out front. Signs that the economy is starting to improve? Might be, according to Peggy Dalton, an economics professor at Frostburg (Md.)
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | January 2, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Construction on the Renaissance Center in Hagerstown has been pushed back indefinitely because of the sluggish economy, City Economic Development Director Deborah Everhart said Wednesday. Work to renovate the building, which formerly was the Holiday Motel, at the corner of Prospect and West Washington streets was supposed to be finished by the end of last year. A sign that says "Renaissance Center Coming 2008" still hangs out front. Edward "Skip" Tovornik Jr., president of CHS Development Property Management of Frederick, Md., proposed using the building to construct eateries and office and retail space.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | arnoldp@herald-mail.com | July 28, 2013
This spring, Chad and Erin Breeden bought gallons of paint - a very pale blue, a toned-down olive shade of green, and a white - to brighten three rooms of the early 20th-century house they had just bought in Hagerstown. Meantime, Larry and Cindy Harnish were buying countertops and plumbing parts to redo two bathrooms in the brick rancher they had just bought near Maugansville. They also purchased white paint; stones and pavers for the area around their swimming pool; and a refrigerator, stove and a 55-inch TV. Collectively, the Breedens, the Harnishes and two other new homeowners whom The Herald-Mail interviewed for this story have pumped more than $565,000 into Washington County's economy since early March.
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NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | arnoldp@herald-mail.com | July 13, 2013
Soon after graduating from different Tri-State-area high schools in 2008 and going off to different colleges, Gretchen Schoeck and Chris Brown began getting the same vibes. “I had conversations with my college classmates when we'd be talking about whether we'd be able to find a job when we graduated. The feeling definitely was nervousness,” said Brown, who graduated from Waynesboro (Pa.) Area Senior High School and, in May 2012, from Washington College in Chestertown, Md. “I heard a lot from my older brother and sister about their (college)
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | June 5, 2013
Addressing a lunch gathering Wednesday organized by the Hagerstown-Washington County Chamber of Commerce, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown stressed the value of partnerships between the state and private businesses to create more opportunities and jobs. Brown, a Democrat who is running for governor in the 2014 elections, earlier this week picked Howard County Executive Ken Ulman to be his running mate. Brown's address was focused on the economy and jobs, and how the state can better help local entities.
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | arnoldp@herald-mail.com | May 26, 2013
It might not be clear whether the economy is improving, but what is clear to Norine T. Dagliano is that many workers and unemployed people suddenly seem hopeful. “Since the beginning of this year,” said professional Hagerstown job resumé writer Dagliano, “I have just seen a tremendous increase in business, of employed people and unemployed people who are feeling enough hope in the economy now, they're ready to pursue other opportunities.” There has been a surge this year in the number of temporary and temporary-to-permanent jobs that area companies are offering, a jobs specialist said, referring to jobs that last only a few weeks and those that offer a few weeks' employment with the potential of becoming more permanent.
OPINION
By ANDREW A. SERAFINI | May 5, 2013
In an effort to provide open and transparent government, the Washington County delegation to the Maryland General Assembly will be hosting a post-legislative public forum on Thursday, May 9, 2013. The forum will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held in Room 212 of the Career Programs Building on the campus of Hagerstown Community College. The delegation members will give a brief overview of the 2013 legislative session and afterwards, audience members will be able to ask questions. The event is free and open to the public.
OPINION
April 21, 2013
Current leaders could learn from Eisenhower's example To the editor: In these times of troubled relations between political parties, we need to take a quick look back in history to what I consider to be the “gold standard” of playing well with others. When Dwight Eisenhower was our president he famously met with Democrat Senate Leader Lyndon Johnson and Democrat Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn on a regular basis to discuss matters of importance to the American people.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | April 13, 2013
Dwelling as we have of late on Downtown Hagerstown's cloudy future is all well and good, but at some point we might stop to remember that our inherent strength is changing over time. Instead of coming from the city, our economic engine is increasingly being fueled by the countryside - or any place or event that gets people out and about. Some recent statistics show just how much this is true. Tourism as measured by hotel occupancy rates was up 11.1 percent in 2012, three times higher than the the state's second-place county (Talbot)
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | arnoldp@herald-mail.com | April 7, 2013
The nation's ongoing economic doldrums, mixed with generational differences, have hit rock maple as well as blond furniture hard, and all but the finest antiques have suffered. But at area auctions, the venerable box lots - random cardboard box assortments of such things as old egg beaters, bottle openers, calendars and road maps - still are selling well. Often, the buyers are people who hope to resell the individual items for a profit, auctioneers said. “The box lots, the generic type of household items, things you would see at flea markets, that market has grown stronger,” said auctioneer John F. Kohler Jr., who owns Gateway Gallery Auction in Chambersburg, Pa. “I attribute that to more people are using the yard sale, flea market venue or Craigslist to garner more income,” Kohler said.
OPINION
By WILLIAM B. McKINLEY | April 6, 2013
Hagerstown Regional Airport (HGR) is one of the many hidden gems of Washington County. It is a primary link between our rural communities and the national transportation system. This link is vital to the growth of our county because it contributes to the economic base by providing and supporting the air transportation needs of the Quad-State area. Plus we cannot ignore the fact that the airport: • Costs very little to the taxpayer to operate. • Plays a key role in workforce development.
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