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Earthquake

NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | August 23, 2011
A magnitude 5.8 earthquake centered in Virginia Tuesday afternoon sent shock waves to Franklin County and beyond. It lasted less than 30 seconds, but in that short time the quake rattled dishes, shook the ground and knocked pictures off walls. "My cabinets were shaking and the floor was moving. It felt like something hit the building," said Nathan Rotz, president of Innernet Inc., of Chambersburg. His office is on the second floor of Kerrstown Square on Main Street in Chambersburg.
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NEWS
July 19, 2010
Bummer. When someone else's grandchildren ask me on down the road where I was during the great East Coast earthquake of ought-ten, I'm going to have to tell them the truth: I slept through it. When I saw the details on the morning news -- strongest quake to hit within 30 miles of D.C. since they began keeping records -- I tried to play catch-up, so I'd have something to report to the out-of-state relatives (who always seem to know more about Maryland...
NEWS
By CHRIS COPLEY | July 23, 2010
A year ago, amateur geologist Alan Hedges and Marie Byers, executive director of Discovery Station children's museum in Hagerstown, came up with an outlandish, eye-catching title for a geology talk for Hedges to present at the museum. "Could an earthquake happen in Washington County?" Ha-ha. And then, last week, a quake shook the Washington, D.C., region at 5 in the morning on Friday. And, suddenly, Byers and Hedges look astute. Hedges chuckles at the concidental timing, but he admits he was just lucky.
BREAKINGNEWS
August 23, 2011
At 1:51 p.m. Tuesday, a 5.9 magnitude earthquake centered northwest of Richmond, Va., shook much of Washington, D.C., and was felt through the Tri-State area and as far north as Rhode Island and New York City. Where were you, and what did you feel in the Tri-State area? The Herald-Mail would like to hear your story. Just post it below along with your name:
NEWS
July 16, 2010
TRI-STATE -- An aftershock could follow the 3.6-magnitude earthquake that struck the Washington, D.C., area Friday morning, but the strength likely would be weaker than the original, according to a federal official. Paul Caruso, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey, said the magnitude of aftershocks typically averages about one point less than the earthquake. The mid-Atlantic doesn't get hit with large earthquakes because it's too far away from major fault lines, Caruso said.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
A small earthquake was recorded in Franklin County, Pa., late Monday by the U.S. Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center. A 2.1-magnitude earthquake was recorded at 11:58 p.m. in what the U.S. Geological Survey's system calls Guilford Siding. That area, which is believed to refer to Guilford Township, is six miles north of Waynesboro. No residents reported to the center that they felt the earthquake, geophysicist John Bellini said. This type of earthquake would typically last a second or two, and could be felt, Bellini said.
NEWS
August 13, 2010
SAIPAN, Northern Mariana Islands (AP) -- A magnitude 7.2 earthquake has struck 215 miles off the coast of Guam. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center in Hawaii says there is no widespread tsunami predicted. The temblor occurred south of the Mariana Islands at a depth of 12 miles.
NEWS
May 2, 2011
North Hagerstown High School students will raise money Wednesday for victims of the recent earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Students will accept donations at the gate during the Rick Hill Track Meet at North High and will wait on spectators for concession orders in exchange for tips for the relief effort. The meet, in which North High hosts South High every other year, honors a donor who helped complete North High’s track at Mike Callas Stadium. It will begin at 5 p.m.
NEWS
By EBONI JAGGERS | August 8, 2010
SMITHSBURG - Identical twins Asher and Aliyah Newberry are virtually inseparable. They do everything together - including saving the world one hot dog at a time. They say their "twin telepathy" played a part in cooking up the idea. The twins, 9, said after hearing about the devastating earthquake in Haiti, they knew they wanted to do something to help. "Our teacher told us about an earthquake in Haiti," Asher said. "I heard every single person (at school) talking about it, and I asked my mom about it. " Aliyah said it was Asher's idea to put on a benefit to support Haiti, adding hot dogs into the equation was her idea.
NEWS
April 14, 2010
BEIJING (AP) -- Soldiers and civilians used shovels and their bare hands to dig through collapsed buildings in search of survivors after strong earthquakes struck a mountainous Tibetan region of China on Wednesday, killing at least 589 people and injuring more than 10,000. The series of quakes flattened buildings across remote western Yushu county and sent survivors, many bleeding from their wounds, flooding into the streets of Jiegu township. State television showed block after devastated block of toppled mud and wood homes.
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