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Dust

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NEWS
by RICHARD T. MEAGHER / Staff Photographer | May 11, 2006
Norman D. Hann Sr. drives through a cloud of dust as he drags the baseball infield on a Greencastle (Pa.) Junior Baseball Association field Wednesday afternoon. Hann, who said he first played baseball on the fields in 1957, has managed teams in the association and now helps with maintenance of the fields.
OPINION
February 9, 2013
Some consultant reports deserve to sit on a shelf. But the strategic economic-development report presented to Washington County recently by Urbanomics Inc. is not one of them. Traditional consultant reports all too often break little ground beyond telling the agency that is paying for the report what it wants to hear. A good example is the recent Ripken report, which looked at the downtown stadium issue through rose-colored glasses. The Urbanomics report, by contrast, addressed some of our most glaring unpleasantries head-on.
NEWS
by KEVIN G. GILBERT / Staff Photographer | May 4, 2007
A Shepherd University worker mows the football field Thursday.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | January 13, 2012
Demolition work on the former Washington County Hospital was halted Friday afternoon after a neighbor complained that the wind was spreading thick dust from the demolition site, a Hagerstown official said. "We sent one of our code inspectors down after we started getting complaints, to tell them to shut down" for the day, city spokeswoman Erin Wolfe said. Crew members said they were wrapping up for the day when the inspector arrived, she said. The city plans to return to the site on Tuesday to ensure the work is being done in compliance with the demolition permit issued by the city, which states that adequate measures must be taken to control dust, Wolfe said.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | April 17, 2005
waynesboro@herald-mail.com MERCERSBURG, Pa. - The parent of a James Buchanan Middle School student said Friday his son missed three weeks of school because of illness caused by dust in the school building from an ongoing renovation project. Dust and poor air quality in the building stemming from the construction has caused medical problems for numerous students, said Timothy Stanton of Mercersburg. Children with asthma and other breathing problems particularly are at risk, he said.
NEWS
By JOE CROCETTA / Staff Photographer | September 6, 2007
Skylar Bingaman, 9, of Inwood, W.Va., takes his weekly riding lesson Wednesday on Booker, an 8-year-old American paint horse. Skylar was kicking up dust at the Swartz Farm in Kearneysville, W.Va., in Jefferson County.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | December 29, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- Three employees of Holcim (US) Inc. were covered in limestone dust Monday morning -- one up to his neck -- during an accident at the Hagerstown plant's quarry that sent six workers to the hospital. All six had been released from the hospital as of Monday evening, but a portion of the Security Road business remained shut down while the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) conducted an investigation into the accident, MSHA spokeswoman Amy Louviere said. Gary Batey, the plant manager, said all of the employees were "going to be fine.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | November 19, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Officials on Thursday night detailed plans to tear down the remaining buildings that housed pesticides and other harmful chemicals at the closed Central Chemical plant on Mitchell Avenue, which is a federally designated Superfund environmental cleanup site. A group of community representatives as well as officials monitoring the efforts met Thursday at Haven Lutheran Church to discuss the ongoing cleanup. Experts who will supervise the demolition work said at the meeting that the 14 remaining buildings are vacant, but previous tenants who rented the property after Central Chemical closed the plant left equipment, trash and scrap metal inside many of the buildings.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | October 14, 2002
andrear@herald-mail.com Wesley Gene Hardy has witnessed major changes in safety, technology and environmental responsibility since he began working in the cement production industry 50 years ago, he said. Hardy on Sept. 8 celebrated his 50th anniversary at the Hagerstown cement plant now owned by Canada-based St. Lawrence Cement. He said he never expected to remain at the plant for half-century when in 1952 he took a $1.65-per-hour job operating a stone crusher at the plant's limestone quarry because the job meant a 75-cent raise.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | October 16, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com Concerns about noise, dust, traffic and property values were raised repeatedly at a public hearing Tuesday on a Coseytown Road man's plan to build an all-terrain vehicle park on his 45-acre farm. The arguments were still going three hours into the hearing as opponents lined up at the microphone waiting their turn to speak to the Antrim Township Supervisors. At issue is a proposal by Lester Horst, owner of Horst Cycle Inc., an ATV and motorcycle repair shop and retail store at 4495 Coseytown Road, to build a series to trails for ATV, dirt bike and BMX bikers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | May 4, 2013
As Nicole Glaze of Waynesboro, Pa., fiddled with her cap and gown before Saturday's spring commencement at Penn State Mont Alto, she remembered the obstacles she faced to achieve her dream. “I've worked really hard to get here. I got pregnant when I was 16,” said Glaze, now 20. So many teens give up on their dreams when that happens, she said. But she vowed to herself not to let anything stop her from an education. “To be able to graduate from college is a big thing for me,” she said.
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OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | March 31, 2013
In the late '90s, Allegheny Energy hoped it would become the next Enron; unfortunately, it succeeded. But for a brief year or two, before anyone had heard of raptors or Jeffrey Skilling, it appeared that Allegheny might soar in the rarefied, Fortune 500 air, wheeling and dealing energy contracts from coast to coast, raking in unbelievable fortunes and rubbing elbows with the likes of Merrill Lynch and the big boys on Wall Street. But by 2002, everything was blowing up. Most critically Allegheny lost big gambling in West Coast electricity markets - an activity that was a far cry from the old and dependable Potomac Edison business of generating and selling actual electricity back here in the 'hood.
OPINION
February 9, 2013
Some consultant reports deserve to sit on a shelf. But the strategic economic-development report presented to Washington County recently by Urbanomics Inc. is not one of them. Traditional consultant reports all too often break little ground beyond telling the agency that is paying for the report what it wants to hear. A good example is the recent Ripken report, which looked at the downtown stadium issue through rose-colored glasses. The Urbanomics report, by contrast, addressed some of our most glaring unpleasantries head-on.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | January 16, 2012
Neighbors' concerns about the demolition of the former Washington County Hospital continued over the weekend, when the tall building that crews had been tearing down collapsed in what a neighbor described as a “very large cloud” of dust. A spokesman for the demolition contractor said Monday that the Saturday building collapse was planned and controlled. “We prepared the building and then pushed it over so that we could get it down on the ground, and that was by design,” said John O'Keefe, marketing manager for Brandenburg Industrial Service Co. Inc., the Chicago-based company contracted by Meritus Health to demolish the downtown hospital.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | January 13, 2012
Demolition work on the former Washington County Hospital was halted Friday afternoon after a neighbor complained that the wind was spreading thick dust from the demolition site, a Hagerstown official said. "We sent one of our code inspectors down after we started getting complaints, to tell them to shut down" for the day, city spokeswoman Erin Wolfe said. Crew members said they were wrapping up for the day when the inspector arrived, she said. The city plans to return to the site on Tuesday to ensure the work is being done in compliance with the demolition permit issued by the city, which states that adequate measures must be taken to control dust, Wolfe said.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | January 3, 2012
An unexpected dusting of snow that didn't measure as precipitation on weather instruments slickened roadways and caused several traffic accidents Tuesday morning across Washington County. The snowfall caught road crews by surprise because it wasn't in the weather forecast, said Ed Plank, director of the Washington County Highway Department. "We didn't expect it to hit," said Plank, noting that about 20 of the county's 40 salt trucks were on the road by about 7 a.m. "We got a little behind the eight ball .... We weren't expecting any accumulation.
NEWS
By BOB PARASILITI | November 10, 2009
The South Hagerstown volleyball team has been in the middle of a massive high pressure system. When it comes to Maryland playoff season, the Rebels have been drier than the Sahara Desert. "It's been 16 years since South has been to the state tournament," said Rebels setter Megan Vance. "We feel like we are a team that can go all the way. It will be tough, but we think we can do it. " On Monday, South may have done the next best thing to a rain dance. Vance led the serving onslaught and was all over the floor setting the Rebels in prime hitting positions to spark a 25-8, 25-17, 25-17 sweep of Clarksburg in the Maryland Class 3A West quarterfinals.
NEWS
By LISA PREJEAN | May 29, 2009
"Et tu, Brute?" The question, uttered by William Shakespeare's title character in "Julius Caesar," cuts to the heart of close relationships even today. As he is surrounded and stabbed by conspirators, Julius Caesar struggles with accepting the betrayal of his close friend, Marcus Brutus. In English, the question is "Even you, Brutus?" Yes, he could accept the pain inflicted by the others, but Brutus? Not Brutus. He was a friend who could be trusted, wasn't he? Apparently not. What causes a friend to betray a friend?
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE / Special to The Herald-Mail | May 1, 2009
Does your home have a problem with dust mites? It might be surprising to learn that dust mites are part of everyday life and can be found in virtually every household. The main sources of food for dust mites are human skin cells that slough off a person. Therefore, dust mites exist everywhere we do, because we leave a constant food supply wherever we go. High humidity increases the prevalence of dust mites, so their numbers increase during the summer. However they can be problematic any time of the year.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | February 12, 2009
If Nathan Durboraw has it his way, Roy Deese Jr. will be staring down the back bumper of Durboraw's No. 41 car this season at Hagerstown Speedway. Durboraw, 52, of Cearfoss, has won more Cindy Rowe Auto Glass Late Models championships at the speedway than anyone. He's two ahead of Deese and Denny Bonebrake, who are tied at six each. All three men are still racing. Deese won the points championship last year. Durboraw finished second. That's close enough, says Durboraw, who says he'll be gunning for his ninth points championship.
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