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Dress Code

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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | August 24, 2010
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Waynesboro Area School District students and staff were put on notice Monday that inappropriate dress and grooming will not be tolerated. The school board said it wants the district dress code to be emphasized during the 2010-11 academic year. If not, Board President Ed Wilson cautioned dress rules could become more strict. Superintendent James Robertson said he'd ask the building principals to make the dress code a point of emphasis this year. Concerning employees, board member Pat Heefner said she'd like a blanket statement to be made at the beginning of the year.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | November 14, 2012
A scaled-down version of a districtwide dress code was approved by the Chambersburg School Board Wednesday night despite the pleas of one board member to keep the current policy for at least two more years. After lengthy discussion - which included debate by the board and the public  - the board voted 8-1 in favor of implementing a dress code for the nearly 9,000 students in the school district. The latest rendition of the dress and grooming policy, which goes into effect next school year, prohibits wearing hooded sweatshirts during the school day, jeans with holes in them and tops with writing.
EDUCATION
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | July 24, 2013
Yoga pants are in. So are leggings, if worn with an appropriate dress, skirt or pants. Girls can wear tank tops that cover undergarments and cleavage, but Washington County Public Schools students still cannot wear muscle shirts without also wearing another shirt. If classrooms get chilly this winter, students may wear light jackets in class. Some of the changes for what types of clothing are or aren't appropriate for students are new, but a lot of the issues addressed in the updated dress code formalize things that were already happening in schools, but were not reflected in the formal dress code that was last changed 10 years ago. That was one of the points Amanda Krehbiel, last school year's student representative on the Board of Education, and other students made last year as Krehbiel led the student charge to update the dress code.
NEWS
August 16, 2011
A Boonsboro Middle School eighth-grader on Tuesday asked the school board to improve the district's dress code. Madeline Clingan challenged the policy that says shorts, skirts and dresses must "cover the mid-thigh when sitting down, or be at least long enough to meet the tip of the student's longest finger when the student is standing with arms down at the sides. " Madeline said the policy penalizes students with long arms and fingers, like hers. To demonstrate, Madeline, who is about 5 feet 8 inches tall, and her friend, Emily Anderson, who stands about 5 feet 5 inches, stood side by side, wearing the same type of shorts.
NEWS
By Lloyd Waters | October 6, 2012
I used to have a dress code policy at my prison, and was surprised recently when I read of Superintendent Joe Padasak's difficulty as he attempts to implement a dress code policy for the Chambersburg Area Senior High School. A school dress code can often help to reduce problems, but then again it doesn't appear that we Americans are concerned very much about dress these days, or school problems. Just maybe Superintendent Padasak's goal is to create a more safe school environment for the students who attend Chambersburg high.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | February 28, 2013
In an attempt to modernize and clear up ambiguities in the student dress code, three high school students presented proposed changes to the Washington County Board of Education's Policy Committee on Thursday. Some of the proposed dress code changes would put into policy types of clothing or shoewear students are already wearing to school, students said. The proposed revisions were devised by about 65 middle and high school students during Washington County Association of Student Councils meetings last November, said Amanda Krehbiel, the school board's student representative.
NEWS
January 20, 1997
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY Staff Writer Wearing frayed jeans and dying your hair purple doesn't mean you're a bad kid, said Williamsport High School junior Kris Fischer. But both will get you in trouble under the school's strictly enforced student dress code, said Fischer, who believes the dress code is unnecessarily restrictive and infringes on the rights he's been guaranteed by Washington County Board of Education policy. "I have pants that are declared disruptive because they're frayed and have some patches sewn onto them, and I'm not allowed to dye my hair," said Fischer, 16. He said he believes the language in the school board's "Students' Rights and Responsibilities" policy forbids his school from banning hair dye and patches that make political statements.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | September 25, 2012
The Chambersburg Area School Board is giving the community a chance to ask questions tonight about a proposed new dress code for all students that bans denim, shirts without collars or with patterns or logos. The forum will be in the Chambersburg Area Senior High School auditorium from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Hooded sweatshirts are not permitted under the new dress code, and hair must be in the range of blond, black, auburn/red and brunette. School district Superintendent Joe Padasak said the forum will be held before the school board meeting, but no vote will be taken at the meeting on the dress code.
NEWS
September 25, 2012
The Waynesboro Area School Board on Tuesday adopted a new dress code for teachers and continued the process to soon adopt one for administrators and support staff. For teachers, prohibited items include denim jeans, tank tops, flip-flops, athletic shoes and sweat pants. The policy, which passed unanimously, also addresses grooming. High school teacher Natasha Bloom addressed the school board, saying she understands the school board's motives, but feels her facial piercing does not affect her abilities in the classroom.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | April 3, 2013
Washington County Public Schools' almost 10-year-old student dress code will get revamped thanks to student efforts led by the school board's student representative, Amanda Krehbiel. While the Board of Education didn't approve a first reading of Krehbiel's proposed dress code changes during Tuesday's meeting, it did take steps to allow the dress code to change, and perhaps be updated more often as fashion trends change. The board unanimously approved an amendment proposed by board member Wayne D. Ridenour that removes specifics about clothing from the policy and charges the superintendent or his designee to develop dress-code regulations in consultation with student representatives.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | August 4, 2013
Dress code changes are coming to two Franklin County, Pa., school districts for 2013-14. Chambersburg Area School District made significant adjustments to what students will be allowed to wear. Waynesboro Area School District consolidated some existing policies and placed prohibitions on short skirts and jeans with holes. “Last year, we did the staff dress code across the district, and we wanted to continue the process,” said Sherian Diller, superintendent of the Waynesboro Area School District.
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EDUCATION
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | July 24, 2013
Yoga pants are in. So are leggings, if worn with an appropriate dress, skirt or pants. Girls can wear tank tops that cover undergarments and cleavage, but Washington County Public Schools students still cannot wear muscle shirts without also wearing another shirt. If classrooms get chilly this winter, students may wear light jackets in class. Some of the changes for what types of clothing are or aren't appropriate for students are new, but a lot of the issues addressed in the updated dress code formalize things that were already happening in schools, but were not reflected in the formal dress code that was last changed 10 years ago. That was one of the points Amanda Krehbiel, last school year's student representative on the Board of Education, and other students made last year as Krehbiel led the student charge to update the dress code.
EDUCATION
July 24, 2013
Dress code regulation highlights: • Head coverings are allowed if they are worn with a “sincerely held religious belief system” or for medical reasons. Other headwear, including hats, visors and sunglasses, cannot be worn in school. • Bandanas are acceptable if they are folded to be less than 2 inches in width and are worn as a headband to hold hair in place. Other headbands, scrunchies and accessories used to hold hair in place, without covering the entire head, also are permitted.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | May 13, 2013
The possibility of a dress code policy for Washington County Public Schools employees recently was discussed by some school board members, but the issue might be addressed without creating a formal policy, the chairwoman of the school board's Policy Committee said. After the Policy Committee, which consists of three board members, discussed the issue in April, it decided to recommend the superintendent have staff and representatives from employee groups collaborate on establishing a statement and guidelines for professional dress rather than the board pursue a formal policy, Policy Committee Chairwoman Jacqueline Fischer said.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | April 3, 2013
Washington County Public Schools' almost 10-year-old student dress code will get revamped thanks to student efforts led by the school board's student representative, Amanda Krehbiel. While the Board of Education didn't approve a first reading of Krehbiel's proposed dress code changes during Tuesday's meeting, it did take steps to allow the dress code to change, and perhaps be updated more often as fashion trends change. The board unanimously approved an amendment proposed by board member Wayne D. Ridenour that removes specifics about clothing from the policy and charges the superintendent or his designee to develop dress-code regulations in consultation with student representatives.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | February 28, 2013
In an attempt to modernize and clear up ambiguities in the student dress code, three high school students presented proposed changes to the Washington County Board of Education's Policy Committee on Thursday. Some of the proposed dress code changes would put into policy types of clothing or shoewear students are already wearing to school, students said. The proposed revisions were devised by about 65 middle and high school students during Washington County Association of Student Councils meetings last November, said Amanda Krehbiel, the school board's student representative.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | November 14, 2012
A scaled-down version of a districtwide dress code was approved by the Chambersburg School Board Wednesday night despite the pleas of one board member to keep the current policy for at least two more years. After lengthy discussion - which included debate by the board and the public  - the board voted 8-1 in favor of implementing a dress code for the nearly 9,000 students in the school district. The latest rendition of the dress and grooming policy, which goes into effect next school year, prohibits wearing hooded sweatshirts during the school day, jeans with holes in them and tops with writing.
NEWS
By Lloyd Waters | October 6, 2012
I used to have a dress code policy at my prison, and was surprised recently when I read of Superintendent Joe Padasak's difficulty as he attempts to implement a dress code policy for the Chambersburg Area Senior High School. A school dress code can often help to reduce problems, but then again it doesn't appear that we Americans are concerned very much about dress these days, or school problems. Just maybe Superintendent Padasak's goal is to create a more safe school environment for the students who attend Chambersburg high.
OPINION
September 25, 2012
 “I wish the parents in Franklin County would stop whining about the dress code for their children. Had they been doing their job all along, it wouldn't be necessary for the schools to tell their children how to dress.” - Chambersburg, Pa. “To repeal Obamacare, to save Medicare and Social Security, vote Republican. Our country is running out of money. The few workers we have left cannot seed the programs. A financial disaster is awaiting all of us if we continue in this same old way.” - Boonsboro “To the Hagerstown caller wanting to know if we wanted to blame President Obama for the Kennedy assassination: We couldn't do that.
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