Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsDiversity
IN THE NEWS

Diversity

NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 16, 2006
HAGERSTOWN In the name of diversity, the Washington County Board of Education is trying to minimize academic disparities and cultural barriers, schools officials said Monday. Maryland is projected to be, within 15 years, a "majority minority" state, Deputy Superintendent for Instruction Patricia Abernethy said. That means most residents will belong to what are considered minority groups. Abernethy said the district is working to improve minority students' test scores and to better understand cultural differences.
Advertisement
NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | January 16, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - A new generation is being introduced to Martin Luther King Jr.'s message. The famous words from his "I Have a Dream" speech and chants of "lead, not follow" rang throughout the Hagerstown Community College Athletic, Recreation and Community Center Monday morning during the college's fourth annual Unity in Diversity celebration. About 500 area students participated in diversity workshops, led by local teachers and HCC staff. Marvin Worthy, CEO of Worthy Consulting, led high school and college students in one workshop.
NEWS
By Wanda T. WILLIAMS | December 12, 2004
HAGERSTOWN In a move to increase campus diversity, Hagerstown Community College formed a racially mixed multicultural committee through which members hope to create a more multicultural campus, campus officials said. Donna Rudy, chairwoman of the Multicultural Committee and HCC's dean of student affairs, said the committee also will explore ways to strengthen the recruitment and retention of minority students, faculty and staff. "In higher education, you open the doors for students, so you want to make sure you have a representative body of students, as well as faculty and staff who service those students," Rudy said.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | March 5, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com Citing an increase in its racial and ethnic diversity, the Washington County Board of Education is asking for a federal grant of about $1 million to implement two new magnet programs and revise three existing ones, a school board official said Thursday. The racial and ethnic diversity of students enrolled in Washington County Public Schools has changed, from about 95.7 percent white in the mid-1980s to about 87.2 percent white this school year, Roger Giles, director of funded and special programs, said during an oral presentation to the board.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | July 26, 1998
As president of the Washington County Council of Churches, the Rev. David Buchenroth knows the value of working together. So what puzzles him is why only about 40 of the 180-plus churches in Washington County are active council members. "The council fosters a sense of community and the need to look after each other as brothers and sisters," Buchenroth said. The council has a history that goes back at least 50 years and possibly a lot longer ago than that, he said. In the last nine years that Buchenroth has been in town and a member of the council, he knows firsthand the council's worth.
NEWS
By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | July 19, 1999
It is not necessary to be an artist to be an art lover, according to art collector and physician William Marshall. "My only background is as a surgeon - but some say surgery is an art form," said Marshall, who is most interested in American paintings from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. His profession has helped him to appreciate the works of others and given him the means to acquire them, he said. The physician and his wife, Nancy, of Peoria, Ill., have 50 representational paintings in their collection - 47 of which are on display at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts Museum through Aug. 22. More than 250 people came to the museum Sunday for a reception for the Marshall Collection and a concurrent exhibit of glass works by French artist Rene Lalique from the Lewison Collection.
NEWS
March 31, 2004
Here are some interesting tidbits about artichokes: One of the oldest known foods, artichokes have been cultivated in the Mediterranean for thousands of years. The globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus) apparently was carried to Egypt and farther eastward between 2,000 and 2,500 years ago. The globe artichoke also is known as the green artichoke, French artichoke and garden artichoke. Artichokes were first planted commercially in California during the 1890s by Italian immigrants near Half Moon Bay. Artichokes grow best in moderate climates.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | January 23, 2000
Late one night as he was leaving his church, Pastor Robert Griffin encountered a prostitute outside the 40 W. Church St. sanctuary. "She told me how much it meant to her that she could always look through our front window and see the cross all lit up on the altar," Griffin said. When Griffin invited her to come inside the New Light Metropolitan Community Church to worship sometime, the woman said she'd think about it. Griffin said she hasn't come in yet, but he rejoices that he is the pastor of a congregation that would heartily welcome her into their midst if she does.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | January 22, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - Some said if they closed their eyes, it was like they were there. It was as if they had traveled back to Aug. 28, 1963, as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his "I Have a Dream" speech. Though, instead of listening in Washington, D.C., they were at Hagerstown Community College. And in King's place they saw the Rev. Darin Mency of Greater Campher Temple. It was the fifth year the school has hosted the Martin Luther King Jr. diversity celebration, according to Donna Rudy, dean of student affairs at HCC. "It's an opportunity to focus upon (the Rev.)
NEWS
March 20, 2001
County more racially diverse, Census says By ANDREA BROWN-HURLEY andreabh@herald-mail.com Racial diversity in Washington County has increased slightly in the last decade, according to unadjusted U.S. Census 2000 figures released Monday. continued The number of residents describing themselves solely as white fell from about 93 percent in 1990 to about 90 percent on the 2000 census. Washington County last year received a diversity index rating of 20 percent, up from the 14.1 percent diversity rating it received in 1990.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|