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LIFESTYLE
March 23, 2012
Shepherd University will host the Diversity and Cultural Competence: Create and Cultivate with Courage and Compassion seminar and workshop on Thursday, March 29.  A workshop for faculty and staff will be held in the Storer Ballroom, Student Center, from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.; a seminar for prenursing and nursing students will be from 2 to 3 p.m. in the Frank Center. A workshop will be held with nursing faculty, the nursing advisory council, and community health care partners at 3:30 p.m. in Erma Ora Byrd Hall and a reception will follow the workshop.
OPINION
By EARL RAY TOMBLIN | March 7, 2013
As we prepare for our state's 150th birthday and reflect upon our history, we have many wonderful people for whom to be thankful - people who have worked together to make West Virginia what it is today. Our state was built by people of all different backgrounds; people like you and me, with stories passed down from generation to generation. Whether it's the fine craftsmen and resourceful laborers from Ireland, Scotland, Germany and Africa, the Swiss farmers who settled Helvetia or the first settlers who found their ways along the Midland Trail, their stories speak volumes to our culture, history and traditions.
NEWS
January 15, 1997
Folk performers Kelly Armor and David Sturtevant bring diverse influences to their concerts. They also bring a lot of equipment. Armor said she has so many instruments that Sturtevant has placed a moratorium on getting any new ones. "I have about 11 onstage at any given time," Armor said in a telephone interview from Erie, Pa., where she lives with Sturtevant, her husband of 312 years. "It never fails," Armor said. "When we arrive at a gig, people say, 'Wow, you have a lot of stuff.
LIFESTYLE
By HEATHER KEELS | September 28, 2010
From his five months of living in a community of resettled refugees in Clarkston, Ga., there is one conversation journalist Warren St. John says he will remember more than any other. St. John, author of "Outcasts United: An American Town, a Refugee Team, and One Woman's Quest to Make a Difference," said Tuesday during a presentation at South Hagerstown High School that one of the most eye-opening exchanges he had while writing the book was talking with Shamshoun Dikori, a youth from central Sudan, about his experience coming to the United States at age 15. "He said that in his village in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan, if a stranger walked into town, everyone in the village would come out to meet that person, they'd bring a lot of food, and they'd have a lot of questions," St. John said.
NEWS
By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | May 7, 2000
After taking several photos of female figures recently, photographer Bruce Wilder found he wasn't satisfied with the result. Wilder, of Boonsboro, said he wanted to temper the black and white photos' contrast by adding a subtle reddish-brown tint. He found the solution in strong spot of tea. By soaking the developed photos in a pan of tea mixed with water he was able to alter the hue to his liking. "It warms it up and it's nontoxic," he said. Being able to experiment with different photo techniques is what makes the art compelling, said Wilder.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | October 4, 2003
martinsburg@herald-mail.com Diversity, not the Washington-area sniper attacks, was the focus Friday of a visit to Berkeley County by former Montgomery County Police Chief Charles Moose, who gained fame as the lead police spokesman during the sniper investigation a year ago. Moose, author of "Three Weeks in October: The Manhunt for the Serial Sniper," visited each of the county's three high schools and Valley View Elementary School during...
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | February 25, 2005
bonnieb@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Saying that the Wilson College Black Student Union is "a beacon to this campus," Simona Hill encouraged the Wilson community to talk openly about transformation and diversity. "Wilson is at a critical juncture in your history," said Hill, a scholar-activist. "You can make a decision for diversity, consistent with your strategic plans. You have an ethical responsibility to prepare students for a diverse world. " Hill visited Wilson College to take part in the institution's two-day "Colors of Wilson" Black History month event.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | April 29, 2007
As she was growing up, pageant contestant Rachel Salvador said other children could not help but notice she looked different. Sometimes they even wondered if she spoke English. This year's first runner-up in the Miss Washington County scholarship pageant, Salvador has Cuban and Puerto Rican roots, and said she sometimes speaks "Spanglish" at home. In pageant circles, she talks the language of diversity. "My parents always taught us to walk with your head high. Don't be ashamed because God made us all different.
NEWS
By DONNA BRIGHTMAN | September 10, 2007
Editor's note: Once a month, Washington County Board of Education members and school staff use this space to write about school system issues. This month's column is written by School Board member Donna Brightman. On July 27, I attended the 2007 International Model United Nations at Saint James School. Close to 60 teenagers from China and South Africa joined Maryland teens in a summer camp organized by the Frederick-based UNESCO Center for Peace. "We want them to realize there are many ways to live," said Serge Atontsa, the peace camp coordinator.
NEWS
By BRUCE HAMILTON | February 27, 2000
Fourteen-year-old Lawrence Staten invited the congregation of Asbury United Methodist Church on Sunday to travel through time and change history. cont. from front page Staten, son of the Rev. Yvone Mercer-Staten, evoked the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech as part of a program to celebrate Black History Month, which ends Tuesday. Staten speculated how the present would be different if King had not been murdered. Ralph Abernathy, a civil rights leader who was one of King's aides, would be the 43th president, racism would be outlawed as a crime against humanity and America would be a true melting pot accepting of all people, according to Staten.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | June 28, 2013
Workplace bullying, dealing with different demographics in the workforce and the impact of the most recent U.S. Census all were topics Friday at the 2013 Cumberland Valley Society for Human Resources Management Diversity Conference. The conference, held at Fountain Head Country Club, featured five presentations. “We are opening this up to an opportunity for people in the local community and H.R. (human resources) professionals in the community to learn more about diversity initiatives that they could do or just different offerings that are out there from a diversity perspective,” said Emily Kovaleski, diversity director of the Cumberland Valley Society for Human Resources Management.
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NEWS
By HOLLY SHOK | holly.shok@herald-mail.com | April 25, 2013
Seeking 500 Washington County enrollees to participate in a 20- to 30-year study aimed at finding cancer cures, the American Cancer Society on Thursday hosted an enrollment kick off with the plan to start collecting information and local blood samples in July. The national cancer prevention study, called CPS-3, looks to gain information on genetics, lifestyle and environmental factors that cause cancer by studying a sample constituting a diverse population of 300,000 Americans, according to Cathy Beckley-Thomas, Community Manager of the American Cancer Society's South Atlantic Division.
OPINION
By EARL RAY TOMBLIN | March 7, 2013
As we prepare for our state's 150th birthday and reflect upon our history, we have many wonderful people for whom to be thankful - people who have worked together to make West Virginia what it is today. Our state was built by people of all different backgrounds; people like you and me, with stories passed down from generation to generation. Whether it's the fine craftsmen and resourceful laborers from Ireland, Scotland, Germany and Africa, the Swiss farmers who settled Helvetia or the first settlers who found their ways along the Midland Trail, their stories speak volumes to our culture, history and traditions.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | January 21, 2013
It was likely known to almost all at Hagerstown Community College's Kepler Theater on Monday that this year's official observance of Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday also happened to coincide with the second inauguration of President Obama. “It's amazing just how far we have come as a society,” said Gloria Murray, who was attending the Martin Luther King Jr. Diversity Celebration with her husband Nickey and children Matthew, Marqus, Nicole and Michael. “It's exciting because my kids have an opportunity to see this,” she said.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | March 31, 2012
Professionals from diverse backgrounds are working every day for a vulnerable segment of Franklin County's population, dedicating their efforts to preventing and fighting sexual abuse of children. When Lauren Sulcove left the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office in 2007 and moved to Franklin County, she expected to be prosecuting fewer child sex abuse cases because of the smaller population and rural setting. “I have as many cases now as I did in Philadelphia,” said Sulcove, who graduated from Temple University School of Law. In the city, Sulcove worked with other prosecutors who handled cases involving sexual abuse of a minor.
LIFESTYLE
March 23, 2012
Shepherd University will host the Diversity and Cultural Competence: Create and Cultivate with Courage and Compassion seminar and workshop on Thursday, March 29.  A workshop for faculty and staff will be held in the Storer Ballroom, Student Center, from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.; a seminar for prenursing and nursing students will be from 2 to 3 p.m. in the Frank Center. A workshop will be held with nursing faculty, the nursing advisory council, and community health care partners at 3:30 p.m. in Erma Ora Byrd Hall and a reception will follow the workshop.
NEWS
January 23, 2012
I was recently asked what I like most about my job. My answer was that every day is different, and the wide variety of people with whom I get to work. I used the example that in the previous week, I had consultations with a dairy farmer, a family working to transition to the next generation, a shepherd whose day job is at NIH and an aspiring blueberry grower who is an administrator at a local college. While these folks might seem very different, they are also greatly similar.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | January 8, 2012
Today's brides want gowns as diverse as they are, bridal experts said Sunday. New York-based designer Madeline Gardner joined the staff of Chambersburg's J&B Bridals for the store's annual Bridal Expo at Wilson College. Gardner presented 34 designs from her spring 2012 line from the Mori Lee collection. The gowns had a variety of shapes, fabrics and embellishments, reflecting what Gardner said is demand for diversity. "It's frilly, it's sexy, it's texture," Gardner said of the latest style requests.
OPINION
By ART CALLAHAM | September 4, 2011
Last week, I used this column to suggest that the City of Hagerstown create a Community Development Corporation to develop and execute a vision for the downtown. I did not intend to criticize or judge, merely to point out that to my knowledge there is not a cohesive plan to move the downtown forward. I'd like to define in this week's column who I suggest should make up a CDC Board. Other than some time spent doing a little community development here locally, I have no particular bona fides to support my opinion.
OPINION
By TOM FIREY | July 20, 2011
Herald-Mail columnist Allan Powell has devoted several recent op-eds to arguing for bigger, more activist government. He claims that limited government as envisioned by the Founders and advocated by many people today is “obsolete” and can't address the problems of the modern world. Powell's comments are sincere and thoughtful, and deserve reply. To answer him, we must understand limited government's core principles: what it values, what it considers the proper role of government and what it considers private.
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