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Disease

NEWS
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | alnotarianni@aol.com | October 20, 2012
Enthusiasm and pink were big players Saturday on the campus of Hagerstown Community College. Outside, people strode with spirit and purpose as triumphant music blared across the grounds. Inside, others shimmied and thrust to saucy Latin tunes.                                      The signature pink of breast cancer awareness showed up high in the air on balloons. It waved on tribute flags and decorated the shirts of hundreds. It was the color of a Gumby-like ribbon costume that wrapped around the neck of a woman and extended the length of her body, and it dyed the hair of humans and the fur of dogs.
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NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | September 6, 2012
The attorney for the owner of an assisted-living home where a resident fell through the floor argued that the felony charges against his client should be dismissed, but a Washington County District Court judge on Thursday found there was probable cause to send the case to circuit court. Dickson Oben Tabi, 53, of 7701 National Pike, Boonsboro, had his preliminary hearing Thursday on two felony counts of abuse of a vulnerable adult resulting in physical injury and a misdemeanor count of reckless endangerment.
LIFESTYLE
August 18, 2012
Alzheimer's Action Day is from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21, at Frederick Community College Conference Center, 7932 Opossumtown Pike in Frederick. Wear purple, learn from professionals and teach elected representatives about the impact this disease has on lives. The conference features leaders from the Alzheimer's Association, audience feedback and questions, responses from elected officials, and a panel presentation. For more information, call 800-272-3900.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | August 18, 2012
Most days, Alli Rogers is in pain. This is the reality of the young woman's life as she battles a rare disease - one for which there is no cure. She has been in and out of hospitals, has had three surgeries, with the most recent requiring three blood transfusions. She has had a partially collapsed lung and kidney failure. And when she's not undergoing treatment, she has a regimen of daily medications. Despite these challenges, the 24-year-old doesn't allow herself to feel defeated.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | May 11, 2012
Officials investigating a disease that kills bats have noticed a severe decline in a bat population in an abandoned cement mine in Washington County. The number of bats in the mine is the lowest since monitoring of the problem began in 1998, according to the National Park Service. White-nose syndrome - named for a white fungus that forms on the faces of infected bats  - was observed in the old cement mine during bat surveys conducted in March, according to a news release from the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park.
OBITUARIES
December 19, 2011
Sylvia Marie DeBaugh, 67, of Martinsburg, W.Va., died Sunday, Dec. 18, 2011, at her residence after a courageous battle with ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease, while under the care of Hospice. The family will receive friends Tuesday from 7 to 9 p.m. at Brown Funeral Home. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated Wednesday at 11 a.m. at St. Joseph Catholic Church with Monsignor Patrick Fryer as celebrant.   
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | December 2, 2011
An effort to replace the 500 units of blood given to a Charles Town woman over her lifetime already is showing promise that it will succeed, the woman's husband said Wednesday. Lee Snyder, whose wife, Cynthia, died July 6 at the age of 58 after a lifelong battle with Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA), said a blood drive held in her name in mid-November bought in more than 50 units of blood. Cynthia Snyder was diagnosed with the rare disease when she was 6 weeks old. DBA, named for the physicians who described it in 1938, is the failure of bone marrow to produce red blood cells.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | November 27, 2011
Doll Amsley remembers her 16-month-old great-niece blowing her kisses the last time she saw the girl alive. Alyssa Troia succumbed Oct. 30 to the genetic disease she battled throughout her young life. It's the same disorder diagnosed in her older brother, Corbin. Amsley organized a bingo Sunday at the Mercersburg Sportsmen's Club to benefit her niece's family. As they arrived for the event, family and friends offered encouragement to Alyssa's mother. “If you met her, she'd have your heart in the first five seconds.
LIFESTYLE
October 28, 2011
"The Cholesterol Story: Are You Fighting Heart Disease?," will be presented at 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 6, at Hagerstown Seventh-day Adventist Church, east of Hagerstown. The program will discuss ways to naturally stamp out circulatory diseases. For more information, call 301-733-4411.
LIFESTYLE
October 7, 2011
 West Virginia University Hospitals-East and the WVU Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center Eastern Division will sponsor a community mini-medical school program on the effects of diseases on the kidneys. The seminar, titled, "Kidney Disease: What Is It? What Can I Do?," is Tuesday, Oct. 18 in the WVU Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center on the City Hospital campus. The featured speaker is Dr. Paul Welch, board certified nephrologist and internist on staff at City Hospital and Jefferson Memorial Hospital.
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