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Discrimination

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OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | July 24, 2013
When most of us think of discrimination, we think of “other” people. If you are a WASP, you often view your efforts to abate discriminatory practices as a form of mission work - an altruistic gift for the good of others. But the best reason for actively opposing discrimination lies in the protection of one's own self-interest. If it can happen to one, it can happen to anyone. This came home to me in the fall of 1965. I was a third-year student at Duke Law School. I had spent the last three or four months reporting on another “Civil Rights” summer.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the extension of the voluntary claims process for Hispanic and women farmers and ranchers who allege discrimination by the USDA in past decades. All claims must be filed by May 1. The process offers a voluntary alternative to litigation for each Hispanic or female farmer and rancher who can prove that the USDA denied his or her application for loan or loan-servicing assistance for discriminatory reasons for certain time periods between 1981 and 2000.
NEWS
By HOLLY SHOK | holly.shok@herald-mail.com | May 21, 2013
She started her story with the night she was paralyzed - a then 18-year-old lying on the side of a European road, rain splashing on her face, a searing pain as she tried to stretch. “I can't stand to touch my body,” she said. “It feels like a stranger. I place my hands high on my chest where I can feel me.”  On her flight home from Spain, her gurney was situated over the airplane seats and she was concealed behind curtains. “Midway through the flight, a strange woman sticks her head between the curtains and asks me the question that I will hear for the rest of my life: 'We've all been wondering, what's wrong with you?
NEWS
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY | April 22, 1998
A Waynesboro, Pa., man claims that a Hagerstown Suns promotion that gives families a discount on Sundays for bringing a church bulletin to the ballpark violates his civil rights and is religious discrimination, a team spokesman said Tuesday. But officials of the Class A minor league baseball team, an affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays, say they believe the popular promotion is a natural for an area with a high percentage of churchgoers and is not discriminatory.
NEWS
March 27, 1997
By DAVE McMILLION Staff Writer, Martinsburg KEARNEYSVILLE, W.Va. - The U.S. Justice Department Thursday filed suit against the owners of Images nightclub, claiming the owners refused to allow African Americans to enter the bar. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Wheeling, W.Va., alleges that Images falsely told African Americans who wanted to enter the club that it was private and open only to members. White customers, however, were routinely admitted without regard to membership, according to the Justice Department.
NEWS
April 3, 1997
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY Staff Writer If Washington County businesses are violating federal law by discriminating in hiring, the U.S. Justice Department needs to become involved, U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett said Wednesday night during a forum at Bethel Gardens Community Center. "If what you say is happening is happening, that's illegal," said Bartlett, R-Md., after hearing numerous complaints from people who said local businesses refused to hired black people or kept them from progressing to better jobs.
NEWS
March 15, 2001
Senate hears testimony on gay rights bill Annapolis By LAURA ERNDE laurae@herald-mail.com A Washington County man told a Senate committee Wednesday that he lost a job as an office administrator because he's gay. David Poole said that two weeks before he was going to start his new job, his boss-to-be found out about his sexual orientation and told him not to show up for work. "I was without recourse," said Poole, who asked the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee on Wednesday to approve a gay rights bill that would give others in his situation the right to sue. The bill would ban discrimination based on sexual orientation in public accommodations, employment and housing.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | August 24, 2013
As a young man working in Washington, D.C., 50 years ago, Hugh Crittenden admits he “didn't know how much discrimination was going on at the time.” Nevertheless, he and two friends, Howard Cook and George Hungerford, took part in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on Aug. 28, 1963.  “I had worked at the Library of Congress, and I think they gave us leave that day” to attend the march, the Chambersburg, Pa., native said....
NEWS
June 19, 2006
Those ages 18 and younger can enjoy a free meal and activities while school is out as part of the Summer Food Service Program. The program is sponsored locally by the Washington County Community Action Council in partnership with the City of Hagerstown. It will operate today through Friday, Aug. 11. Lunches will be provided at the following locations: Wheaton Park, Noland Village, Elgin Station, Frederick Manor, Boys & Girls Club of Washington County (Pennsylvania Avenue), Pangborn Park, Hellane Park and the WIC office.
NEWS
July 26, 1997
By VANDANA SINHA Staff Writer Lawrence Freeman says that more than five decades of living in Hagerstown has made him an angry, bitter man. But Freeman, a 52-year-old black community leader, says it's also made him more aware of who he is, more accepting of other people and more persistent in sending a message of perseverance, peace and respect to the city's black youth. He wants to see rising black businessmen, politicians, bankers, teachers and community leaders reverse the trend and pave the way to a more unified, just United States - one he said he has missed out on growing up in Hagerstown.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | August 24, 2013
As a young man working in Washington, D.C., 50 years ago, Hugh Crittenden admits he “didn't know how much discrimination was going on at the time.” Nevertheless, he and two friends, Howard Cook and George Hungerford, took part in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on Aug. 28, 1963.  “I had worked at the Library of Congress, and I think they gave us leave that day” to attend the march, the Chambersburg, Pa., native said....
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OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | July 24, 2013
When most of us think of discrimination, we think of “other” people. If you are a WASP, you often view your efforts to abate discriminatory practices as a form of mission work - an altruistic gift for the good of others. But the best reason for actively opposing discrimination lies in the protection of one's own self-interest. If it can happen to one, it can happen to anyone. This came home to me in the fall of 1965. I was a third-year student at Duke Law School. I had spent the last three or four months reporting on another “Civil Rights” summer.
NEWS
By HOLLY SHOK | holly.shok@herald-mail.com | May 21, 2013
She started her story with the night she was paralyzed - a then 18-year-old lying on the side of a European road, rain splashing on her face, a searing pain as she tried to stretch. “I can't stand to touch my body,” she said. “It feels like a stranger. I place my hands high on my chest where I can feel me.”  On her flight home from Spain, her gurney was situated over the airplane seats and she was concealed behind curtains. “Midway through the flight, a strange woman sticks her head between the curtains and asks me the question that I will hear for the rest of my life: 'We've all been wondering, what's wrong with you?
NEWS
April 9, 2013
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the extension of the voluntary claims process for Hispanic and women farmers and ranchers who allege discrimination by the USDA in past decades. All claims must be filed by May 1. The process offers a voluntary alternative to litigation for each Hispanic or female farmer and rancher who can prove that the USDA denied his or her application for loan or loan-servicing assistance for discriminatory reasons for certain time periods between 1981 and 2000.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | March 28, 2013
The Maryland Senate voted by the narrowest of margins this week to send a bill that aimed to address rental housing discrimination back to committee, effectively ending its chances of passing this year. Sen. Christopher B. Shank, R-Washington, who opposed the bill, said that downtown Hagerstown would have been negatively affected if the bill were to pass. According to the Associated Press, a primary focus of the measure was to prevent landlords from declining to rent to people who get government assistance for housing.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | June 4, 2012
A former employee of San Mar Children's Home in Boonsboro has filed a discrimination complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Maryland Commission on Civil Rights, claiming she was discharged from her job because she is a lesbian, according to documents. Sarah Rutledge, 29, alleges her co-workers made disparaging remarks about her sexual orientation and marriage to a woman throughout her time at San Mar. Rutledge said she also was placed on probationary status on Sept.
OPINION
May 13, 2012
It is senseless to place labels on Jesus Christ To the editor: I'm not ashamed of the gospel of Christ. With more and more frequency, twice in the past week or so, I read doubts about the existence of God and confusion over who exactly Jesus is. Just let me throw this out for any doubter, skeptic or unbeliever. In Heaven, there will be only two things that this earth contains. God's Word, which is the Holy Bible, written by God Himself, using men led by His divine spirit over hundreds of years to convey His message of love, redemption and salvation.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | March 11, 2012
Former Hagerstown Police Department officer Margaret Kline talked about having a larger-than-usual amount of clerical work when she was hired as the city's first female beat officer. Former Hagerstown City Council member Alesia Parson-McBean talked about going to a predominantly black beach in Florida as a youngster. Jeanne Jacobs related seeing Jews being deported from France during the Nazi occupation of the country, and teacher Diane Macklin recalled her experiences being a black teacher.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | September 29, 2010
The longtime Jefferson County administrator fired in September 2009 on a 3-2 vote by the county commissioners this week filed an eight-count civil suit claiming discrimination, human rights violations and wrongful discharge, according to the suit filed in the Jefferson County Circuit Clerk's office. Leslie Smith's suit alleges that all five commissioners violated her rights, discriminated against her on the basis of sex and age, harassed her and broke her work contract, and accuses them of retaliatory discharge and violating the state's wage payment and collection act in firing her Sept.
NEWS
By ANDREW MASON | September 23, 2010
View all of the photos for purchase! As Boonsboro sophomore Sarah Zielinski was easily beating all the girls Wednesday at a four-team cross country meet at South Hagerstown, she entertained herself by taking target practice against the boys, picking them off one by one. The boys and girls races were run simultaneously on the Rebels' 3-mile course, and Zielinski capitalized on the rare opportunity. "Racing guys is really fun," she said. "It pushes you more.
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