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NEWS
April 5, 2007
If a major disaster strikes the State of Pennsylvania, would you be willing to help out? If you have the desire - and the needed skills - the state health department wants to hear from you. According to The Associated Press, Congress authorized all 50 states to develop volunteer registries following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and the subsequent mailing of anthrax-laden letters. The registries were designed mainly as a way to determine how many health-care providers states could call on, but the law also allows states to sign up those with other abilities.
NEWS
July 3, 2003
The Federal Emergency Management Agency will set up a disaster recovery center at Musselman High School in Inwood, W.Va., for those recovering from the recent flooding in Berkeley County. The office will be staffed during the following hours. Wednesday, July 9 to Saturday, July 12 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, July 13 from noon to 5 p.m. Monday, July 14 and Tuesday, July 15 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. The center will close permanently at 7 p.m. on July 15.
NEWS
November 14, 1998
The Washington County Chapter of the American Red Cross will hold its regularly scheduled disaster meeting on Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the Chapter House, 113 S. Prospect St. Dr. Michael Cerveris, a forensic odontologist, will address the group concerning his experience in the aftermath of an aviation disaster. Cerveris is a member of the Pennsylvania Dental Association Dental ID Team, as well as a Red Cross volunteer in Franklin County, Pa. For information concerning the role of the Red Cross in aviation and other disasters or how you can volunteer, call Cindy Blackstock Kline at 301-739-0717.
NEWS
August 28, 2007
The USDA declared Maryland a drought disaster area last week. Officials said the designation will help provide assistance and financial relief to Maryland farmers affected by the severe dry weather and excessive heat from June 1 through the summer months. "It just makes more money available for farmers that can't get a loan from a conventional source, which actually in a disaster situation, that's going to hurt them so more people might really be eligible," said Colleen Cashell, executive director of USDA's Farm Service Agency in Washington County.
NEWS
April 1, 2008
Colleen Cashell, executive director for USDA's Farm Service Agency in Washington County, announced that eligible dairy producers who suffered production losses from extreme heat conditions in 2005 or 2007 may apply to receive benefits under the Dairy Disaster Assistance Program III by visiting their local USDA Service Center. Cashell says, based on the final rule published in the Federal Register on March 4, the program signup ends May 5. "The program provides $16 million in benefits to dairy producers across the country for dairy production losses that occurred between Jan. 1, 2005, and Dec. 31, 2007, because of natural disasters," Cashell said.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | September 17, 2002
marlob@herald-mail.com Following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the idea of being prepared for emergencies - big or small - has never seemed more important, according to the Red Cross. "The Washington County Chapter of the American Red Cross is suggesting that families prepare an emergency disaster supplies kit," said Cindy Kline, director of disaster services. Not a new idea with the American Red Cross, the push has been on since last Wednesday, when President Bush approved raising the level of civilian alert from code yellow to code orange - the highest level imposed since the alert system was established in March.
NEWS
By CHRIS CARTER | May 31, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Katrina Lehman retreated to her basement with her two cats as the deadliest natural disaster in the history of Myanmar slammed her hometown of Yangon. Ten hours later, she couldn't have imagined the havoc that Cyclone Nargis had reaped. "Total devastation," said Lehman, a native of Shippensburg, Pa. "I was shocked. " Lehman, 41, shared her firsthand account of the cyclone Friday night in front of about 50 people at Marion Mennonite Church. The presentation was sponsored jointly by the Cumberland Valley Relief Center and the Mennonite Central Committee (MCC)
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | June 2, 2013
Zombies. Giant super-storms. Runaway climate change. Alien invasions. Sneak attacks by invading enemy nations. Thrilling stuff of end-of-life-as-we-know-it science fiction books and movies. But as recent news coverage reminds us - Superstorm Sandy in New York; the fertilizer explosion in Texas; the huge tornado in Moore, Okla.; the train derailment and explosion in Baltimore - ordinary events bring plenty of disasters that can end life as we know it, at least for those affected.
NEWS
July 2, 1997
By LISA GRAYBEAL Staff Writer, Chambersburg CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - The big red truck that shows up at the scene of serious fires or disasters, and from which volunteers dole out food and drinks to emergency personnel, has made its last trip. Salvation Army officials announced Tuesday the start of a fund drive to raise $55,000 to purchase a new truck that will be a self-contained disaster response unit for Franklin County. It will replace the 1962 model that, without brakes and a failing engine, has been out of commission for a month.
NEWS
by DON AINES | December 12, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com Members of Community Emergency Response Teams will not be asked to battle a major fire or search a heavily damaged building for survivors, but they can free the hands of those with the training to perform those dangerous tasks during a disaster. Fulton County already has trained 92 people to serve as members of Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT), enough for a team in each of its 13 municipalities, according to Lisa Sherman, the county's emergency management director.
ARTICLES BY DATE
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | September 6, 2013
Verna Brown's advice is like an umbrella. When the sun is shining and everyone's smiling, it's easy to think “Life is good.” But if you're caught outside in a slashing storm, you'll wish you'd planned ahead. And if you're caught in a natural disaster, you'll really wish you'd planned ahead. Getting you to plan ahead is Brown's job. She is Washington County's emergency management coordinator.  “The word 'disaster' is misleading,” Brown said. “I like to tell citizens you're preparing for your average, everyday-type emergencies, even if you're at home.” Brown is co-organizer of the first Preparedness in the Park, a community event to encourage citizens of all ages to prepare for trouble - natural disasters, house fires, power blackouts, neighborhood evacuations - all kinds of trouble.
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OPINION
June 27, 2013
“I was just calling about the responses of the archery in the schools. I just want everybody to remember that not only did we have archery in our schools, we also were able to take safety gun courses in our schools. It was usually on Saturdays, and you would go there for I don't know how many hours, to take your test. You'd have a presentation, you'd take a test, and then you would have your gun safety certificate.” - Hagerstown “I think it's time for Washington County to open a Jewish community center.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | June 2, 2013
Zombies. Giant super-storms. Runaway climate change. Alien invasions. Sneak attacks by invading enemy nations. Thrilling stuff of end-of-life-as-we-know-it science fiction books and movies. But as recent news coverage reminds us - Superstorm Sandy in New York; the fertilizer explosion in Texas; the huge tornado in Moore, Okla.; the train derailment and explosion in Baltimore - ordinary events bring plenty of disasters that can end life as we know it, at least for those affected.
NEWS
May 2, 2013
Whether it's an explosion, flooding or a tornado, there are three basic things you need to be prepared for any emergency: a plan, supplies and information. First, develop an extensive plan so you and your family know what they're going to do in any situation. Second, have a kit that provides basic needs, water and nonperishable food items for a minimum of 72 hours and includes any items for any family member, like a child or an older adult, who has special needs. Third, constantly monitor what is going on so you stay informed.
OPINION
November 22, 2012
Obama is steering country toward an economic disaster To the editor: I had to shake my head over Allan Powell's comments concerning Obama's re-election. “ America has just been given a wonderful gift ,” he wrote. Powell really can't be serious. He goes on to say that Obama's victory is a mandate to move forward. Well, I hate to burst Powell's bubble, but Obama only received 50 percent of the popular vote. To me, that means this country is still seriously divided over the direction we as a nation should be taking.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | June 8, 2012
Splotched with fake blood, green and white paint and torn clothes, friends Sean Shearer and Jacob Pauley say they dress in costume every chance they get. But the “Zombie Attack” Friday at Martinsburg South Middle School was no ordinary opportunity. They were among more than 140 people to be screened in the first 20 minutes of the Berkeley County Health Department's zombie-themed, disaster-training exercise, incident commander Vickie Greenfield said. About one third of the people screened were first responders who then treated the gorily-dressed volunteers who took part in the emergency drill, organizers said.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | March 10, 2012
The Christmas decorations were beginning to come down, the gifts long unwrapped and Thanksgiving dinner a distant memory when mail carrier Mike Shoop put Kohl's department store's Black Friday ads in the mailboxes on his route. “Dec. 28 I was casing these, and it was clearly marked on the pieces that they should have been in homes Nov. 19, 21 or 22,” he said. According to area residents, businesses and postal workers, delays of this sort have become common in recent months, and Shoop and other postal workers say they know why. The November closure of the Frederick, Md., Mail Processing and Distribution Facility, which resulted in mail to and from 217- ZIP codes being sent to Baltimore to be sorted, has been an “utter disaster,” overwhelming the Baltimore plant and leading to mail delays of, in some cases, more than a month, said Richard Shelley, who works at the Baltimore Processing and Distribution Facility and serves as director of organization for American Postal Workers Union 181. Shoop, a Hagerstown resident, worked at the Frederick processing center until it closed, then found a job as a carrier in another 217- ZIP code community.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | September 2, 2011
Although Washington County was largely spared from Hurricane Irene damage last weekend, it will be included in an emergency declaration for Maryland counties affected by the storm. Kevin Lewis, the county's director of Emergency Services, said the county helped other parts of the state cope with the hurricane. Seven firefighters from Funkstown and Hancock helped Ocean City firefighters in Wicomico County from Saturday to Monday. And a three-person, swift-water rescue team with Washington County's Special Operations unit went to Baltimore County, then was called to help in Cecil County on Sunday, Lewis said.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | May 23, 2011
A smoldering vehicle protruded from the side of a passenger plane. Bodies, supposedly ejected from the aircraft, peppered the airport’s east apron while the flight crew and passengers remained trapped inside the plane. An employee lay on the ground at the Rider Jet Center with a bullet wound to the head as the person allegedly responsible fled on foot.   Across the rain-soaked tarmac, firefighters, police and rescue workers swarmed to secure the scene, to sort and treat the wounded, and to extinguish flames.
LIFESTYLE
February 11, 2011
To learn how to help a neighbor when disaster strikes, attend a day of disaster training Saturday, March 19, at the American Red Cross Training Room, 25 Penncraft Ave.,Chambersburg, Pa. To register for the event, contact Allen White at 717-264-6214, or awhite@franklin-redcross.org .
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