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Dietary Supplements

NEWS
October 2, 1999
The dangers of combining certain medications with other medications and foods will be illustrated at a free program for seniors on Wednesday, Oct. 13, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the AMVETS on Frederick Street. Sponsored by the SALT council/Triad of Washington County, the program will be presented by Jenni Ertter-Prego from the Food and Drug Administration office in Baltimore. Her talk will include information on prescription and over-the-counter drugs, plus dietary supplements and foods.
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NEWS
by Lynn Little | March 14, 2005
It is estimated that more than half of all Americans take a dietary supplement. According to the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act approved by Congress in 1994, the term "dietary supplement" refers to a wide range of products, including vitamins, minerals, herbs or other botanicals, amino acids, enzymes, hormones, concentrates, extracts and metabolites taken orally that contain an ingredient meant to supplement the diet. About 30,000 products are marketed as dietary supplements in the United States, making the industry worth more than $17 billion per year.
NEWS
July 6, 2005
Southeastern Senior Site 40 Mount Vernon Drive Keedysville 301-432-5624 Horseshoes ? Fridays, July 15 and 29, 10:15 a.m. Uno or darts ? Mondays, July 11, 18 and 25, 10:15 a.m. Bingo ? every Wednesday, 10:15 a.m. Table bowling ? Thursdays, July 7, 14 and 28, and Friday, July 22, 10:15 a.m. Beanbag toss ? Friday, July 8, and Tuesday, July 19, 10:15 a.m. Cards ? Mondays, July 11, 18 and 25, 1 p.m. "Celebrate the Fourth of July" and exercise with Helen House ?
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | August 30, 2006
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Police on Monday foiled an apparent plan by four people to steal medication and other personal items from two Maryland stores and take them to a Martinsburg pawn shop for money, Berkeley County Magistrate Court records show. Jose Ma Mojica-Martinez, 24, and his girlfriend, Amber Lynn Files, 19, both of Winchester, Va., and Floyd Allen Morris, 38, P.O. Box 552, Falling Waters, W.Va., each were charged with transporting stolen property into the state, conspiracy to take the stolen merchandise into West Virginia and attempting to transfer stolen property, records show.
NEWS
July 16, 2005
Maryland Alexander House 301-790-0275 Coffee and conversation - daily. Cards or puzzles - daily, 9:30 a.m. Exercise - Monday (games), Wednesday, Thursday (video) and Friday, 11 a.m. "Adult Evaluation: Why We Have It?" with Alice Sencindiver - Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. Bingo - Wednesday, 1:30 p.m. "How's Your Week?" with Emma - Friday, 10:30 a.m. Potomac Towers 301-991-5168 Coffee and conversation - daily.
NEWS
March 15, 1999
By KATE COLEMAN / Staff Writer photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer People are getting back to their roots - and leaves and flowers and berries - to help relieve common ailments and try to prevent others. The United States retail market for botanical medicines is booming, according to information in the fall 1998 edition of HerbalGram, the journal of American Botanical Council and the Herb Research Fund. [cont. from lifestyle ] One form of herbal product on the market is a wide variety of teas.
NEWS
By ANDREA ROWLAND | June 2, 2003
andrear@herald-mail.com Cramps? Try eating some garlic. Though some medical professionals strongly advocate further scientific study to prove the medicinal value of garlic and other herbs and spices, others tout the health benefits of herbal remedies that for centuries have been used for healing in other countries. Proponents of herbal medicine say these natural remedies are safe, effective, inexpensive, easy to incorporate into diets and free from the harmful side effects caused by some prescription drugs.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | August 27, 2003
Fresh fruits, vegetables, grains and legumes are alive with nutrients that fuel the body and strengthen the immune system. These pure, unprocessed foods are the basic building blocks of a healthy diet. Many of the nutrition problems in the United States are related to our over-consumption of highly processed foods and snacks. Dietary supplements can provide some nutrition insurance, but whole foods offer great taste and the natural nutrient bundles necessary for overall health.
LIFESTYLE
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | crystal.schelle@herald-mail.com | July 22, 2012
Wendy Crossland said she's always made it clear to her three kids that energy drinks were off-limits, and most importantly, never allowed in the house. "All I knew was that it had a lot of caffeine, which isn't good for anybody," she said, sitting in her Hagerstown home. But Mom can't be everywhere. Crossland, 38, blames a caffeine energy drink for contributing to the death of her oldest daughter, Anais Fournier, just days before Christmas. Anais had consumed two 24-ounce energy drinks in 23 hours.
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