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by DAN LYONS/Motor Matters | February 4, 2005
Here's the dilemma: How do you get the utility of a sport-utility vehicle, without the futility of poor mileage? Jeep's latest take on this target reaches across the pond for its inspiration. For years, Europeans have had gas prices that are even harder for Americans to understand than the French's fondness for Jerry Lewis. One way they've dealt with the problem is by driving diesels. For 2005, Jeep becomes the first automaker to offer a diesel in a midsize SUV in the North American market.
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NEWS
by TIM SPELL/Motor Matters | November 28, 2004
A freshly delivered 2005 Dodge Ram Heavy Duty 3500 with the Cummins Turbo Diesel is awaiting a test drive. I generally enjoy getting into a dually heavyweight, but I'm apprehensive because this truck's first destination is narrow urban streets. It's rush hour, and an awkward Ram-in-a-china-shop experience is anticipated. En route to drive away the new Quad Cab test truck, I'm dreading the hassle of guiding the big Ram through jammed-packed streets and squeezing it into parking spots barely wide enough for a sedan.
NEWS
by WANDA T. WILLIAMS | September 26, 2004
wandaw@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Traffic moved at a snail's pace and the smell of diesel fuel filled the air Saturday morning following a diesel leak and accident on eastbound Interstate 70 near the Md. 65 exit. A small stretch in the far left lane where the fuel spilled was closed to traffic for close to three hours. Mark Anthony Deans of Middlesex, N.C., a driver for North Carolina-based J.R. Foster Trucking, was westbound on I-70 when he said he noticed the leak coming from his tractor-trailer.
NEWS
by DAN LYONS | July 4, 2004
With gas prices near historic highs in the U.S., many people are feeling the pinch. That's especially true as we head into the vacation season, when most Americans do most of their driving. The prospect of pricey fill-ups threatens to turn this into the summer of our discontent. High gas prices hit hardest the vehicles that are least fuel efficient. That description applies to two of the most popular forms of transportation in this country - pickup trucks and sport-utility vehicles.
NEWS
by JEFF JOHNSTON/Motor Matters | June 18, 2004
Long-time campers may be familiar with the Westphalia name as the builders of pop-top VW-van-based camping conversions. Airstream has tapped that company to produce the Westphalia Sprinter class B motorhome based on the new Dodge Sprinter full-size van. Since Westphalia is a German company, many of the Westphalia's features reflect European-style RV design as opposed to typical American-built practice. Naturally, Airstream has a lot of say in the rig's overall design, but the German influence shows through.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | December 13, 2002
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Martinsburg Fire Department firefighters who in September filed a grievance against the city, alleging diesel fumes in their building could cause serious health problems, can have health exams paid for by their health care plan, city council members decided Thursday night. Firefighters had asked that they be tested for medical problems and that a private contractor survey the fire station on Raleigh Street to design a proper exhaust removal system, according to a written six-page report and recommendation prepared by City Manager Mark Baldwin.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | November 14, 2002
scottb@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - A Hagerstown man was out on bail Wednesday after being charged with selling diesel fuel for about $1 per gallon that he allegedly purchased with a stolen credit card, a Washington County Sheriff's Department investigator said. Eric Allen Reid, 36, of Hagerstown, publicized the discount cost of the fuel over CB radio, investigator Greg Alton said. Reid charged about $53,000 to his former employer's credit card since June, Alton said.
NEWS
July 12, 2000
Governors spurn substance in favor of political sniping Like a bratty child who just won't be shushed, the "blame game" version of presidential politics elbowed its way onto center stage last Saturday at the opening of the National Governor's Conference, though neither one of the major party contenders was in attendance. When will they learn that rhetoric is less important than real accomplishment? To his credit, Maryland Gov. Parris Glendening tried to steer the talk back to the real issues, including the link between technology and economic growth and education's importance in preparing young people for a high-tech future.
NEWS
By BRUCE HAMILTON | February 29, 2000
Skyrocketing fuel prices are draining the Washington County Board of Education's school bus budget, but Transportation Director Chris Carter said the yellow fleet should finish the year in the black. The School Board has 177 buses that cover an estimated 60,000 miles a week, according to Carter. Each uses diesel fuel, the surging cost of which caused truckers to stage a protest in Washington last week. The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other oil-producing nations reduced oil production during the last year, a move mostly responsible for higher prices.
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