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By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | October 26, 2012
Reality doesn't get much harder than being diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS. A cruel and steady wasting of neuromuscular functions that paralyzes its victims inch by inch, it's often more kindly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease - named for the famous Yankee slugger who received his diagnosis in 1939. But there is nothing kind about ALS. There is no meaningful treatment. No cure. No magic pill that will reverse the symptoms. It's a taker - stealing the body's supply of strength and agility, the use of limbs and the ability to speak and swallow.
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | October 11, 2012
In a way, breast cancer changed Christine Clifford's life for the better. Just 19 years old when her mother lost her battle with the disease at age 42, Clifford found a lump in her breast during a routine self-examination that led to her own diagnosis when she was 40. “My kids were 10 and 8 at the time, and I thought, 'oh my gosh, I'm going to go the way of my mom. I'm going to crawl in bed and die,'” she said. “And lo and behold, I found humor in my situation.” After her diagnosis, Clifford began drawing cartoons and writing books, which ultimately led to her quitting her “real job” and becoming a full-time author.
NEWS
July 25, 2000
West Virginia has a diagnosis; now its economy needs a plan After the release of the second bleak assessment of West Virginia's economy this summer, boosters of the state might be tempted to conclude that things aren't going to get better anytime soon. However, we take some comfort from Mallie Combs, president of the West Virginia Economic Development Council, who said that any study that identifies problems without looking at possible solutions is worthless. Fortunately, what Combs is seeking is on the way. It will come in the second chapter of a five-part look at the state's economy being done with private funding from Combs' group by Mac Holladay, president of Market Street Service of Atlanta.
NEWS
September 28, 2000
While the diagnosis is rare, men need to know that they're not alone By Kevin Clapp / Staff Writer When Frederick Reeder was diagnosed with breast cancer, a thousand thoughts ran through his head. Shame was not one of them. continued "I don't get uncomfortable about it, no," he says now, almost three years later. He says there probably are men ashamed of being diagnosed with a disease widely considered a woman's illness. But he never did, and figures what's the difference between having breast cancer or lung cancer.
NEWS
June 3, 2002
When Wendy Radonivich-Crum was a young college student, some 12 years ago, she began having headaches. Some were migraine and some were those constant nagging headaches that wouldn't go away. "Then I woke up one morning with equilibrium problems. The doctors couldn't figure out what the problem was. They took an MRI and found some weird stuff there, and thought it might be MS [multiple sclerosis] because there were a couple of suspicious spots. That's how my problem was first classified.
NEWS
May 16, 1997
Many people with Alzheimer's disease and their families don't consult their physicians to get a diagnosis. Yet getting a diagnosis as early as possible is critically important to helping people with Alzheimer's and their families cope with this disease. In a recently published brochure, "Steps to Getting a Diagnosis: Finding Out if it's Alzheimer's disease," Alzheimer's Association gives step-by-step instructions to families on how to prepare for and understand the diagnosis, and what role they play in securing a diagnosis.
NEWS
By DON AINES | February 25, 2006
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, PA. - Chambersburg Area School District Superintendent Edwin H. Sponseller was diagnosed Monday with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system, he said Friday. Sponseller, 61, who is due to retire June 30 after 18 years as superintendent, said he is awaiting the results of tests to determine a treatment program for the disease. At this time he said he does not anticipate he will be taking a leave of absence.
NEWS
March 31, 2003
The four definitions of multiple sclerosis are: Relapsing-remitting: Clearly defined, acute attacks with full or partial recovery and no disease progression between attacks. It is the most common form of MS at the time of diagnosis, affecting roughly 80 percent at onset. Primary-progressive: Nearly continuous worsening of the disease from its onset with no distinct relapses or remissions. Rates of progression vary over time, and there are occasional plateaus and temporary minor improvements.
NEWS
October 17, 2002
katec@herald-mail.com Doug Warner's diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease is a bitter irony, says Jan Warner of Hagerstown, who was married to him for more than two decades. Doug Warner is a retired psychologist. For 35 years he used his mind to help people live healthy and productive lives, Jan says. The diagnosis was not easy to get. Doug Warner knew parts of psychological tests by memory. He still correctly uses words such as antediluvian and megalomaniacal, Jan Warner says.
NEWS
By MEG PARTINGTON | October 15, 2007
The symptoms are silent, but the diagnosis of breast cancer can sound deafening to those who hear it. Once the words "You have breast cancer" are absorbed by the patient and his or her loved ones, quiet might set in again. Despite the prevalence of breast cancer and all the information available about it, many people still want it to remain a "hush-hush" disease, said Lou Lichti, Ph.D., a psychologist with City Park Psychological Services & Associates LLC in Hagerstown. In order for the patient to move forward physically and emotionally, however, Lichti said the silence must be broken.
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LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | April 21, 2013
On the surface, Jennifer Poffenberger's life seems fairly normal. She has been married for 22 years, is the mother of two teenage boys and has a full-time job. Like other parents, she's involved in her children's activities and finds time to volunteer with the Boy Scouts, the Athletic Boosters and PTA. Active in her church, she sings in the choir and serves on a committee. And if that's not enough to keep her busy, she's a Longaberger basket consultant. A lifelong resident of Boonsboro, she is close to her parents, her sisters - who she calls her best friends - and her nieces and nephews.
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LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | October 26, 2012
Reality doesn't get much harder than being diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS. A cruel and steady wasting of neuromuscular functions that paralyzes its victims inch by inch, it's often more kindly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease - named for the famous Yankee slugger who received his diagnosis in 1939. But there is nothing kind about ALS. There is no meaningful treatment. No cure. No magic pill that will reverse the symptoms. It's a taker - stealing the body's supply of strength and agility, the use of limbs and the ability to speak and swallow.
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | October 11, 2012
In a way, breast cancer changed Christine Clifford's life for the better. Just 19 years old when her mother lost her battle with the disease at age 42, Clifford found a lump in her breast during a routine self-examination that led to her own diagnosis when she was 40. “My kids were 10 and 8 at the time, and I thought, 'oh my gosh, I'm going to go the way of my mom. I'm going to crawl in bed and die,'” she said. “And lo and behold, I found humor in my situation.” After her diagnosis, Clifford began drawing cartoons and writing books, which ultimately led to her quitting her “real job” and becoming a full-time author.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | April 20, 2012
Jennifer Bain is more than her disease. She's a wife, a mother, a grandmother, a friend. She's not defined by the cane she uses or the scooter that helps her conserve energy. And she doesn't care for labels that identify her limitations. But when it comes to the challenges of living with multiple sclerosis - an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system - Bain said she's pretty much an open book. "In fact, I might share more than many people want to hear," the Keedysville resident said.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | February 25, 2012
Debbie Godlove's life took a turn when her husband Jim's parents moved into a series of local nursing homes. "For years, we visited every day or every other day," Godlove said. "That is where I decided I was going to become a volunteer. People in nursing homes need people to visit with them. " Godlove, of Hagerstown, bumped into a former co-worker who volunteered with the Nursing Home Visitation Program organized by a coalition of police and seniors. Godlove wanted to know more.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | September 16, 2011
Phil Cosentino never has been one to sit back and watch life go by. Instead, he lives it to the fullest. He's a runner who participates in everything from trail races to half marathons. He loves to ski and has logged more than 30 scuba dives. And, although he's an attorney by profession, he's a bit of a landscaper - the dirtier the project the better. To most people, including Cosentino, he seemed the picture of good health. "I have always been very active.
NEWS
By ANDREW GAY / Special to The Herald-Mail | March 2, 2009
Pat Henson of Waynesboro, Pa., spends his days working for the main post office in Frederick, Md. But his passion is music. Henson, 39, plays drums, teaches drum students and performs with local rock band TwoFace. But a year ago, Henson thought he wouldn't be able to do any of that again. He was diagnosed with Miller-Fisher syndrome. Miller-Fisher involves a temporary, partial paralysis of the body, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokes.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | October 16, 2007
Blessed. It's a small word. But for Gloria Hughes, it holds a lot of meaning. She feels blessed to have a wonderful family, good friends and a satisfying career. She also feels blessed to be a breast cancer survivor. "I can't begin to tell you how fortunate I feel," the 54-year-old Hagerstown resident says. "My cancer was found in the very early stages. I consider that a big blessing. " Hughes was diagnosed with breast cancer in October 2005. "It's kind of ironic," she says, "but for a couple of years I had been dealing with stomach issues.
NEWS
By MEG PARTINGTON | October 15, 2007
The symptoms are silent, but the diagnosis of breast cancer can sound deafening to those who hear it. Once the words "You have breast cancer" are absorbed by the patient and his or her loved ones, quiet might set in again. Despite the prevalence of breast cancer and all the information available about it, many people still want it to remain a "hush-hush" disease, said Lou Lichti, Ph.D., a psychologist with City Park Psychological Services & Associates LLC in Hagerstown. In order for the patient to move forward physically and emotionally, however, Lichti said the silence must be broken.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | January 10, 2007
A resident of Loyalton of Hagerstown was found to have Legionella, forcing the assisted-living facility near Hagerstown Community College to take extra precautions with its 85 residents, Christine Ogden, the facility's executive director, said Tuesday. "One of our residents was diagnosed with Legionella, and we don't know where it came from," Ogden said. Legionella is the bacteria that causes Legionnaires' disease, a severe pneumonia that causes 8,000 to 18,000 hospitalizations a year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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