Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsDeregulation
IN THE NEWS

Deregulation

NEWS
July 24, 2003
Maryland's top advocate for residential utility customers last week said that deregulation of electric power, expected to bring consumers lower prices, may actually spur increased costs when rate caps begin to expire next year. Before that happens, it's time for state lawmakers to take another look at the idea. Michael Travieso, the Maryland People's Counsel, told the (Baltimore) Sun last week that when deregulation was passed in 1999, lawmakers expected that competition would develop, leading to lower prices.
Advertisement
NEWS
BY DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | February 27, 2002
The Hagerstown City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved spending $6,500 to join a regional electricity transmission organization that will oversee the flow of electricity across high-voltage wires, City Light Department Manager Terry Weaver said. The cost could raise customers' bills by less than a few cents, if at all, Weaver said. The city will join PJM Interconnection, he said. This service was previously done by Allegheny Energy. But as part of the federal deregulation process, Allegheny Energy is required to join a regional transmission organization, such as PJM, Weaver said.
NEWS
March 23, 2001
Experts say California-style energy shortage is unlikely here By ANDREW SCHOTZ andrews@herald-mail.com The state of California's debilitating power shortage has virtually no chance of happening in Maryland, energy experts said Thursday. Both states have deregulated their electricity industries - California in 1996, Maryland last year - but the similarities end there. "We don't have the same problems with generation," said Robert Harris, assistant manager of external relations for the Maryland Public Service Commission, which regulates the state's power industry.
NEWS
September 1, 2000
Pennsylvania power Folks worried that California's summertime shortage of power - and the high prices consumers were forced to pay for it - will soon face Pennsylvania residents should stop worrying, according to officials of the state's Public Utility Commission. PUC officials told a group attending a hearing on the reliability of the state's electric supply that California's problems were a result of unique conditions there. Perhaps they are, but given that these two states were among the first to deregulate the sale of electric power, a look at what happened there might prevent California's problems from coming east.
NEWS
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY | February 24, 2000
As of July 1, most residential customers in Maryland will be able to shop for the electricity that lights their homes and powers their refrigerators, televisions, computers and other appliances. There's a lot they need to know to make an informed choice, a spokesman for the Maryland Public Service Commission's consumer education campaign said Thursday during a forum in Hagerstown. This spring, consumers will be able to get all the information they need, said Al Cappannelli, director of media relations for High Point Communications Group, a New Hampshire company hired by the commission to get the word out. The Public Service Commission's goal is to make it easy for people to learn about electric deregulation, Cappannelli said.
NEWS
November 3, 1999
The public can learn more about how their electric bills will be affected by Maryland's electric industry deregulation law at a meeting today. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. at Hagerstown Community College's Advanced Technology Center, Room 121. It is hosted by Allegheny Power and the Washington County Delegation to the Maryland General Assembly. Delegation Chairman Bob McKee, R-Washington, will be there along with representatives from the Maryland Public Service Commission and Allegheny Power.
NEWS
March 24, 1999
Residents of Hagerstown, Williamsport and Thurmont will apparently get a pass from whatever sort of electric-supply deregulation legislation is produced by the Maryland General Assembly this year. Folks outside those municipal boundaries, however, should pay close attention to what comes out of Annapolis in the next few weeks. The municipalities exempted from the legislation are three of five Maryland cities that own their own utilities. Though two of those, in Berlin and Easton, still generate some power, most purchase the bulk of it from larger suppliers, and are now using their customer base to negotiate for lower prices.
NEWS
By DON AINES | July 29, 1998
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - In choosing a company to supply electricity to a home or business, Dr. Dennis E. Buffington advises: Buyer beware. Because of deregulation of electricity generation, most Pennsylvanians may now choose from whom they wish to buy their power. The sales pitches, however, may be as confusing as those for long-distance companies, according to Buffington, a professor of agricultural and biological engineering at Penn State University. Tuesday night he explained deregulation to about 75 people at the Penn State Cooperative Extension Office.
NEWS
May 30, 1998
By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer Maryland consumers could miss out on savings expected to come with the deregulation of the electric utility business, state utility experts said Friday. Consumers must join together and have their voices heard if they want to benefit from the process, expected to begin in July 2000, said Frederick H. Hoover Jr., director of the Maryland Energy Administration. "This is going to happen with you or to you," he told a group of about 60 people attending a conference on rural Maryland at the Hagerstown Venice Inn. Businesses, which stand to gain or lose the most from the way Maryland implements deregulation, already are lobbying, said Public Service Commission Chairman Glenn F. Ivey.
NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | March 27, 1998
Allegheny Power opposes bill ANNAPOLIS - Allegheny Power, which has been a vocal supporter of electrical deregulation, is opposing legislation in the Maryland General Assembly that would accelerate competition in the state. Company officials said that while they support the concept of competition, they oppose the way some lawmakers are trying to achieve it, in an amendment that could be added to an existing piece of legislation. "The biggest problem is there has never been a public discussion," said Carolyn Shaw, state government affairs manager for Allegheny Power, a Hagerstown-based utility that has 1.4 million customers in five states.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|