Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsDeregulation
IN THE NEWS

Deregulation

NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | October 21, 2002
andrews@herald-mail.com The sky was blue in Allegheny Energy's world in July 2001 when Chairman Alan J. Noia announced the latest venture - a split creating two independent companies. Noia said the move was about "unlocking shareholder value. " Allegheny Energy Supply - Allegheny Energy's unregulated generation and wholesale energy division - was growing faster than the rest of the company. Allegheny Energy stock closed at $42.65 that day. Six months later, Allegheny Energy, which is based in Hagerstown, canceled its planned initial public offering for the spinoff company.
Advertisement
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | January 9, 1999
A local University of Maryland campus, a new building for the Hagerstown YMCA and electricity deregulation are three issues the Maryland General Assembly is likely to tackle during the upcoming session, local lawmakers said. State lawmakers will play a key role in getting financing for a university campus in Washington County, said Sen. Donald F. Munson, R-Washington. The legislative session begins Wednesday and lasts until mid-April. The campus probably would be established with one building, paid for through the state university budget, Munson said.
NEWS
By DON AINES | February 22, 1999
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Most area residents, local governments and businesses are eligible to switch to alternative suppliers under Pennsylvania's law deregulating the electricity industry. [cont. from news page ] Consumers can now shop around for electricity, but Waynesboro, Pa., decided to stay with Allegheny Power Company, according to Borough Manager Lloyd Hamberger. The borough has about 60 municipal accounts with the company, he said. "We had a devil of a time finding anyone that would compete with Allegheny.
NEWS
By BOB MAGINNIS | April 29, 2008
Now that almost everyone acknowledges that Maryland's plan to deregulate electricity didn't work, state officials are looking at how to prevent a power shortage predicted by the state's Public Service Commission. The Associated Press last week reported that the PSC study said that if no major changes were made, the state could face rolling "brownouts" or even blackouts by 2011. If they happen, much more than inconvenience for this region will be involved. Last June, The Baltimore Sun reported that the National Security Agency, one of the nation's top spy organizations, had already experienced power outages in some of its buildings at Fort Meade, Md., and officials there were worried that old substations couldn't handle the power load.
NEWS
by DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | September 15, 2005
daniels@herald-mail.com Electricity costs at Volvo Group's Hagerstown powertrain plant, which produces powertrains for Mack and Volvo heavy-duty trucks, climbed considerably starting Jan. 1, 2005. But not to the degree they were going to, and only because the company was ready, a plant official said Wednesday. "Our electricity costs nearly doubled if we hadn't gone out and shopped," said Roger Johnston, vice president and general manager. "Look around, there's some good suppliers out there.
NEWS
June 23, 2006
Though Maryland Gov. Robert Ehrlich's decision on whether to veto a bill to mitigate a 72 percent power rate hike proposed by the Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. doesn't affect local citizens' rates, it does provide them with something valuable. Unlike BGE's customers, whose state representatives seemed clueless until the proposed increase was announced, the controversy has been a giant wake-up call for those who represent constituents served by Allegheny Energy. We hope they spend the next two years crafting a workable solution.
NEWS
by DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | April 30, 2005
Aided by Maryland's switch to market-based rates, Allegheny Energy reported a 27.93 percent increase in net revenue for the first quarter of the year. Starting Jan. 1, business and industrial customers within Allegheny's service area in Maryland were able to shop for electricity suppliers, though they still must pay Allegheny for the delivery of that power. As a result, Allegheny increased its Standard Offer Service rates to those business and industrial customers that stayed with the company by between 23 percent and 51 percent, depending on the amount of electricity they use. Those increases exclude customers just using electricity for lighting purposes only.
NEWS
By Daniel J. Sernovitz | July 30, 2005
Allegheny Energy Inc. reported a consolidated net loss of $18.4 million, or 12 cents per diluted share, for the second quarter, reduced from higher losses of $39.5 million, or 31 cents per share, last year, as the company seeks to recover from substantial debt and improve its stock rating from junk status. Allegheny Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Paul J. Evanson said the earnings report indicates the company is advancing toward a more solid financial picture with decreasing expenses and solidly improving revenues from its core operations.
NEWS
September 22, 2005
The Hagerstown-Washington County Chamber of Commerce serves local businesses and organizations by promoting economic development, providing information for and about the business community, and lobbying for business interests in Hagerstown and Annapolis. The Chamber holds monthly mixers, regular breakfast meetings and annual events to inform the business community about current issues and to provide networking opportunities for its members. The Chamber also sponsors government forums and educational partnerships and helps obtain certificates of origin needed for companies to ship goods overseas.
NEWS
By BOB MAGINNIS | June 10, 2007
Back in the late 1990s, when Maryland officials were selling the benefits of electricity deregulation, the argument in favor of it went something like this: Instead of being stuck with your one traditional supplier, you would be able to shop for a company that would give you a cheaper rate. Competition would work its magic and users would reap the benefits, as utilities cut their prices to sign up new customers. There were a few problems with this approach, however. On the East Coast, there wasn't enough surplus generating capacity to entice utilities to cut prices to find new customers.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|