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Deregulation

NEWS
August 25, 1997
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY Staff Writer At this point, it's not a question of if Maryland retail customers will be able to shop around for their energy supplier but when they'll start doing it, said Allegheny Energy head Alan J. Noia. Looking at what has been happening around the country - including Pennsylvania's recent Customer Choice Act and the Maryland Public Service Commission's hearings on restructuring last week - Noia said he and other energy company leaders are now resigned to the fact they'll be losing their government-mandated monopolies as power suppliers.
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NEWS
May 7, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Energy professionals will present a seminar called "Electric Deregulation: What it Means to Your Business" Tuesday, May 20, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Wilson College's Laird Hall, 1015 Philadelphia Ave. The seminar will explain how businesses can prepare for increased electric rates. It is co-sponsored by Schaedler Yesco, which has an office at 409 Grant St., the Greater Chambersburg Chamber of Commerce and Wilson College. The program will include information about electric deregulation and its impact on rates, energy legislation, sustainable lighting, smart metering and possible tax savings if improvements are made by the end of this year.
NEWS
January 10, 2001
On power deregulation, take time to do it right Last year West Virginia lawmakers passed a measure to give the state's Public Service Commission the authority to develop a plan for the deregulation of electric power sales. All that was left was for the legislature to approve a resolution in the 2001 session. But before that happened, the wheels came off California's electric deregulation system. As of Tuesday, Gov. Gray Davis was threatening to seize the plants of wholesalers which gouged customers or utilities.
NEWS
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY | February 2, 1998
Consumers may form groups to get cheaper power LINTHICUM, Md. - A potential employer is offering you two weeks vacation and a pretty good health plan, including dental and vision benefits. But what kind of deal can they get you on kilowatt hours? In the not-too-distant future, employers could be offering their employees group rates on electricity the same way they now offer group medical coverage, speakers at a statewide conference on energy deregulation speculated on Monday.
NEWS
June 8, 2006
If the members of the Maryland General Assembly have any sense of responsibility to their constituents, they will answer the following questions before a special session opens next week: If you were in the legislature in 1999, why did you believe electricity deregulation was a good idea? And, if you have served in Annapolis since then, why did it take you so long to figure out that deregulation wasn't working out as planned? The first person who should be called on to answer those questions is Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, who was co-sponsor of his chamber's version of the electricity restructuring bill.
NEWS
January 23, 2007
After the courts stymied Maryland lawmakers' attempt to fire members of the state's Public Service Commission, General Assembly leaders are trying a new approach - politely asking PSC members to leave. We wouldn't blame commission members if they decided they wanted to leave behind such idiocy, but we hope they don't give the lawmakers a victory they don't deserve. In case you have forgotten, state Sen. President Thomas V. "Mike" Miller was among those who sponsored the deregulation of the state's electric utility industry.
NEWS
BY ANDREA ROWLAND | March 13, 2002
About 850 electric customers in Williamsport will soon pay more for electricity as a result of a federal order aimed at streamlining the management of electrical transmission systems. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's order is indirectly linked to the complex issue of state-directed electric deregulation, FERC Spokeswoman Barbara Connors said Tuesday. It's been theorized that deregulation will result in more choice and lower costs for electric customers. Wholesale electric consumers nationwide are buying electricity over greater distances, Connors said.
NEWS
November 12, 1997
Phone booth call now 35 cents By KERRY LYNN FRALEY Staff Writer Without a telephone line of his own, Hagerstown resident Scott Huff said he relies on pay telephones to make most of his calls. "Or I use my mom's phone and give her a quarter," said Huff, 31, who figures he'll have to raise that to 35 cents to be in line with Bell Atlantic's new local pay phone rate. The telephone company announced Wednesday that it was hiking its local pay phone rate from 25 cents to 35 cents in eight states and Washington, D.C., beginning immediately.
NEWS
By DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | November 6, 2005
daniels@herald-mail.com Many of the region's large commercial and industrial businesses will find their electricity bills higher and more difficult to predict in January as part of a shift to market-based rates. "The way the market is right now, I don't think that anybody is seeing lower power costs," said Gary Batey, general manager of St. Lawrence Cement in Hagerstown. "Certainly you need to shop it, everybody needs to shop around and see what prices are available, but it's not going to get a lot better.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | October 1, 2006
WASHINGTON COUNTY - Once upon a time, getting electricity was as simple as calling the number in the phone book, providing a street address and switching on the lights. No longer is that the case. When Maryland decided to deregulate energy and open the market to competition, it meant businesses faced the prospect of dramatically increased electricity bills. For a small-business owner who not only is overseeing his or her business but also taking out the trash and writing paychecks, understanding deregulation became crucial.
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