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Deregulation

NEWS
July 24, 2003
Maryland's top advocate for residential utility customers last week said that deregulation of electric power, expected to bring consumers lower prices, may actually spur increased costs when rate caps begin to expire next year. Before that happens, it's time for state lawmakers to take another look at the idea. Michael Travieso, the Maryland People's Counsel, told the (Baltimore) Sun last week that when deregulation was passed in 1999, lawmakers expected that competition would develop, leading to lower prices.
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NEWS
October 1, 2006
The issue: Businesses faced the prospect of dramatically increased electricity bills when the Maryland General Assembly's deregulation bill went into effect in 2000, opening the market to competition. What happened: The Hagerstown-Washington County Chamber of Commerce created an "Electricity Buying Co-operative. " Owners of small- to medium-sized businesses sign up for the program, in which a consultant shops around to find the best electricity rate. Business owners then have the option of signing a contract.
OPINION
June 19, 2012
In the summer of 2007, house prices in the United States began falling, ending a 15-year-long climb. Prices fell 5 percent by the end of the year and 15 percent by the summer of 2010. That decline continues today; this spring, house prices fell to 20 percent below their 2007 peak. Millions of Americans who once believed “there's no better investment than owning your home” now owe more on their mortgages than what their houses are worth. The collapse was a calamity for homeowners.
NEWS
November 3, 1999
The public can learn more about how their electric bills will be affected by Maryland's electric industry deregulation law at a meeting today. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. at Hagerstown Community College's Advanced Technology Center, Room 121. It is hosted by Allegheny Power and the Washington County Delegation to the Maryland General Assembly. Delegation Chairman Bob McKee, R-Washington, will be there along with representatives from the Maryland Public Service Commission and Allegheny Power.
NEWS
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY | February 24, 2000
As of July 1, most residential customers in Maryland will be able to shop for the electricity that lights their homes and powers their refrigerators, televisions, computers and other appliances. There's a lot they need to know to make an informed choice, a spokesman for the Maryland Public Service Commission's consumer education campaign said Thursday during a forum in Hagerstown. This spring, consumers will be able to get all the information they need, said Al Cappannelli, director of media relations for High Point Communications Group, a New Hampshire company hired by the commission to get the word out. The Public Service Commission's goal is to make it easy for people to learn about electric deregulation, Cappannelli said.
NEWS
By DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | November 6, 2005
daniels@herald-mail.com TRI-STATE - One of the most vocal and active proponents of electricity deregulation five years ago could fall prey to its effects come January, when Allegheny Energy's largest commercial and industrial customers are switched from default- to market-based rates. In mid-October, the Eastalco Aluminum Co. smelting plant in Frederick, Md., sent layoff notices to its more than 600 workers. The notices warned employees the plant could be forced to close on Jan. 1 unless company officials can avert a projected 83 percent increase in electricity costs, plant spokesman Earl H. Robbins Jr. said.
NEWS
June 20, 2006
Electricity customers for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. will get a two-year reprieve on a 72 percent rate increase, thanks to action taken last week by the Maryland General Assembly. In passing the measure, the legislature rejected a deal worked out by Gov. Robert Ehrlich, who plans to hold his own public hearing today to review what lawmakers did. That could lead to an Ehrlich veto, which would almost certainly be overriden. As this all plays out, we hope voters don't forget that this failed effort to cut consumer costs through deregulation was championed by some of the same leaders now opposing Ehrlich's plan.
NEWS
By DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | November 6, 2005
daniels@herald-mail.com It is too early to tell whether Maryland's electricity customers will realize any long-term savings from the state's efforts to deregulate the market, which started in 1999. In the nine months since the process began within Allegheny Energy's service area, however, at least one beneficiary of the effort is beginning to emerge. During a conference call with investors on Oct. 28, Allegheny's chief financial officer, Jeffrey Serkes, said the company posted an additional $37 million in revenue for the third quarter due to Maryland's switch to market-based rates.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | January 24, 2007
Many of the 40 people who gathered last week at South Hagers-town High School to hear Allegheny Energy's rate hike proposal were nervous, as if they were deciding whether to take a ride on an amusement park's scary new roller-coaster. The bad news is that, barring some unlikely intervention from the Maryland General Assembly, everybody will have to ride. Only instead of holding on for dear life as the coaster dips and turns, riders' most frightening moment could come when they open their power bills a year from now. That's when the cap on Allegheny's residential rates comes off and the utility begins charging "market rates" for electricity.
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