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NEWS
By DON AINES | March 25, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- About 200 registrations came in the mail, about 75 more came from registration drives by the Barack Obama campaign and at Greencastle-Antrim High School, and there was a steady stream of people through the Franklin County Voter Registration Office on Monday, the final day to register for the April 22 primary. As the day began, the number of people who had switched to the Democratic Party was 784, with just 144 switching to the GOP. New registrations were about even with 500 Republicans and 496 Democrats, according to Voter Registration figures.
NEWS
August 27, 1999
By BRENDAN KIRBY / Staff Writer photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer WILLIAMSPORT - Washington County's most fervent Democrats braved rain Thursday night to rally the troops in a year that does not even feature an election. Rick L. Hemphill, the chairman of the local Democratic Central Committee, said the party would raise about $2,500 from the picnic at Williamsport Red Men Lodge. "We expected between 250 and 300 people, and I'd say we have somewhere around there," he said.
NEWS
September 30, 2008
The Franklin County (Pa.) Democratic Party will hold its monthly Democratic breakfast on Saturday at 9:30 a.m. at Main Street Deli, 177 S. Main St., Chambersburg, Pa. All interested supporters of the Democratic Party are invited to attend.
NEWS
November 4, 2002
To the editor: Which party took Social Security from an independent fund and put it in the general fund so that Congress could spend it on programs that have nothing to do with Social Security? It was Lyndon Johnson and the Democratic-controlled House and Senate. Which party put a tax on Social Security? The Democratic party. Which party increased the tax on Social Security? The Democratic party with Al Gore casting the deciding vote. Which party decided to give money to immigrants?
NEWS
February 26, 1998
By BRENDAN KIRBY Staff Writer The vice chairwoman of the Washington County Democratic Central Committee has resigned to take a job with the federal government, the party announced Thursday. Cheryl Hershey, 46, who had been the vice chairwoman since 1994, took a job with the Department of Transportation in Washington, D.C. By taking the job, Hershey was forced to give up her Democratic Party post by the Hatch Act, which restricts federal employees from engaging in political activity.
OPINION
By GEORGE MICHAEL | September 20, 2012
Was God “booed” at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte earlier this month?  A simple procedural process of getting a reference to God and a statement about Jerusalem and Israel in the Democratic platform turned into a public relations nightmare. It is not smart to boo God in the Bible belt. To be fair, it was hard to tell if God was the target of the audience or if delegates were just frustrated at the ineptness of the voting process. Political parties usually handle procedural and public relations strategies in the proverbial smoke-filled rooms.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | July 20, 2005
Ernest E. Pletcher, a retired Maryland State Police sergeant and pastor of First Church of God in Mercersburg, Pa., has filed to run for clerk of Washington County Circuit Court in the 2006 election. Pletcher, 62, who filed as a Republican, said he voted for incumbent democrat Dennis J. Weaver in the last election, but feels "it's time for a change," according to a letter he wrote to The Herald-Mail. He listed his address as 16728 Tammany Manor Road in Williamsport. An Elections Board official said Pletcher filed July 12. Weaver, who has been clerk of the Circuit Court for more than 18 years, said Tuesday that he plans to run again.
OPINION
December 13, 2012
Republican Party must agree to change To the editor: For four years, the Republican Congress sat on its hands with one goal in mind - to make President Obama a one-term president. It failed. Next, it tried voting down every proposal that the Democratic Party made, proclaiming what the American people wanted. Wrong again. With a fired-up base, they tried to take the president out (election 2012). They were unsuccessful again. With all of that behind us, they have decided to try other ways to upset the president's apple cart.
OPINION
By TOM FIREY | August 29, 2012
The 2012 general election campaign officially begins this week with the opening of the Republican National Convention, followed next week by the Democratic Convention. The parties' presidential nominees, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, have been telling voters for months that this November's election is a pivotal choice between contrasting philosophies of government. So far, the American electorate has not pivoted toward either the Republicans or the Democrats: Polls show the contests for both the White House and control of Capitol Hill are close.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 22, 2013
“I'm glad to see Sheriff Mullendore has finally admitted that the purpose of speed cameras in school zones is to generate money, and not for the safety of our children.” - Williamsport “I, for one, am tickled to death to see that Potomac Edison is being investigated. I've been complaining about my electric bill for a long, long time. Potomac Edison's response to me was they do not have enough meter readers to come and read my meter. When you pay a $600 electric bill every month, you deserve to have your meter read.” - Boonsboro “First the flush tax triples, now the gas tax is more, and now they're talking about taxing us for water that runs off our driveways and our roofs.
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OPINION
December 13, 2012
Republican Party must agree to change To the editor: For four years, the Republican Congress sat on its hands with one goal in mind - to make President Obama a one-term president. It failed. Next, it tried voting down every proposal that the Democratic Party made, proclaiming what the American people wanted. Wrong again. With a fired-up base, they tried to take the president out (election 2012). They were unsuccessful again. With all of that behind us, they have decided to try other ways to upset the president's apple cart.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | December 8, 2012
Belva Snyder had many and varied passions - her four children, politics, community involvement, fashion and driving - to name a few. “Politics were her second life outside of her children,” oldest child Sandra Turtle said. Andrea Clopper of Hagerstown, Belva's middle daughter, believes her mother heard a Democratic speaker at a young age and liked what she heard so much that she devoted herself to promoting the Democratic Party. “We were all Democrats,” Andrea said.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | October 14, 2012
Former U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, who died Sunday, could be a polarizing figure, but he spoke to the point and often elicited laughs with his quips. Specter represented Pennsylvania in the Senate for three decades. He lost a re-election bid after switching from the Republican to the Democratic party in 2009. L. Michael Ross, president of the Franklin County Area Development Corp., said Specter tried to visit each of Pennsylvania's 67 counties every year or two years. Ross described Specter as a key player in helping Letterkenny Army Depot in Chambersburg, Pa., through the Base Realignment and Closure Commission process in 2005.
OPINION
By ART CALLAHAM | September 30, 2012
I have tried to remain politically nonpartisan in these columns. As most of you know I'm a registered Republican and consider myself to be a conservative, although, I have many friends who are Democrats and liberal in their ideological bent. In this column I want to write about a different type of partisanship that is not orientated on a particular political party. More on ideology; this partisanship I simply label as “geographic partisanship.” In this column I'm going to be partisan about where you and I live.
OPINION
By GEORGE MICHAEL | September 20, 2012
Was God “booed” at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte earlier this month?  A simple procedural process of getting a reference to God and a statement about Jerusalem and Israel in the Democratic platform turned into a public relations nightmare. It is not smart to boo God in the Bible belt. To be fair, it was hard to tell if God was the target of the audience or if delegates were just frustrated at the ineptness of the voting process. Political parties usually handle procedural and public relations strategies in the proverbial smoke-filled rooms.
OPINION
By DAVID HANLIN | September 5, 2012
Growing up in New York state, I was raised a Democrat. I don't remember there being any discussion in our family as to why. Democrats controlled most elected offices and had held them for years. That is just the way it was. As a young Democratic adult, I had the good fortune of having a short stint on Capitol Hill and subsequently worked as an aide for a congressional campaign. After leaving the world of elected politics and furthering my education, I returned to New York. I became employed in a highly regulated industry.
OPINION
By TOM FIREY | August 29, 2012
The 2012 general election campaign officially begins this week with the opening of the Republican National Convention, followed next week by the Democratic Convention. The parties' presidential nominees, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, have been telling voters for months that this November's election is a pivotal choice between contrasting philosophies of government. So far, the American electorate has not pivoted toward either the Republicans or the Democrats: Polls show the contests for both the White House and control of Capitol Hill are close.
OPINION
May 10, 2012
When lawmakers convene in Annapolis for a special session Monday, it will be ostensibly to work out state budget matters, but more, it will be a living history lesson in what happens when lawmakers fail to do the job they are elected to do. Let's be clear: This is not the federal government, where one house is staunchly Democratic, the other staunchly Republican. In Annapolis, the State House is controlled by Democrats through and through. It's disagreeable when two different parties fail to come to a meeting of the minds, but incomprehensible when one party cannot agree within itself.
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