Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsDeath Row
IN THE NEWS

Death Row

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | December 18, 2012
A death row inmate convicted in Franklin County, Pa., returned to Chambersburg on Tuesday for a hearing related to his claims of inadequate performance from his attorneys, improper jury instructions and prosecutorial misconduct. Albert E. Reid, 64, formerly of Biglerville, Pa., was found guilty in the Dec. 27, 1996, killing of his estranged wife, Carla Reid, then 36, and her 14-year-old daughter Deidra Moore in a Sollenberger Road home outside Chambersburg. On Tuesday, a specially assigned senior judge, David Grine, presided over a status conference and scheduled a pair of hearings.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | April 10, 2000
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Local Quakers on Sunday hosted a gathering to discuss the death penalty in Pennsylvania, which they said has 225 inmates on death row. Quaker, or Society of Friends, philosophy mandates a belief that only God should have the power to take a human life, so life in prison without parole is adequate punishment. According to a flyer published by Pennsylvania Abolitionists United Against the Death Penalty and handed out Sunday at the Lindia Drive Society of Friends meeting house, Gov. Tom Ridge has signed 170 death warrants since taking office in 1995.
NEWS
By DON AINES | February 12, 2009
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- In November, Michael B. Singley filed a petition with Franklin County Court to end appeals of his death penalty. The convicted murderer has since changed his mind, and he was in court Thursday asking to withdraw his earlier petition. "I filed that to be executed because I didn't think I would get any help" in prison, Singley said in a hearing before President Judge Douglas W. Herman. "I just ... felt I wanted to die. " "He doesn't want to die anymore," Assistant District Attorney Laura Kerstetter said after the hearing.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | October 10, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Ray Krone remembers vividly last April 29 when his lawyer called him in prison and asked what he wanted to eat for supper that night. That was how Krone, 45, of Dover in York County, Pa., knew that he was finally going to be free after being imprisoned for 10 years, four months and seven days, much of it on Arizona's death row. Krone and William Nieves, another exonerated death row inmate, were the key speakers at a symposium Wednesday at Wilson College sponsored by the advocacy group Pennsylvania Abolitionists United Against the Death Penalty.
OPINION
By LT. GOV. ANTHONY BROWN | March 25, 2013
Earlier this month, the Maryland Legislature passed legislation abolishing the death penalty. I believe the time has come to repeal the death penalty because it is racially biased, demonstrably unreliable and not an effective deterrent. This debate is full of practical, legal and moral questions that deserve our full attention. Maryland's justice system is strong. Our law enforcement, victim and witness assistance coordinators, judges, prosecutors and corrections officers work tirelessly to keep our state safe and to ensure justice prevails.
NEWS
by DON AINES | March 7, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. Convicted double-murderer Michael Singley was granted a stay of execution Friday by U.S. Middle District Court Judge John E. Jones III. Singley, who is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection April 6, is on death row for the Nov. 3, 1998, rape and murder of Christine Rohrer, 23, at her Elder Street home. "Not only is it not unexpected, it's virtually automatic upon the initial request for counsel," Franklin County District Attorney John F. Nelson said of the stay.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | March 6, 2013
A move to repeal the death penalty in Maryland took another step forward with the state Senate voting 27-20 on Wednesday to abolish capital punishment. Every legislator in the Washington County delegation is against the repeal except Sen. Ronald N. Young, D-Frederick/Washington, who voted for the measure. “It's one that I wrestled with very deeply. But after talking to a lot of people, reading some things from some prison officials, talking to religious leaders and others, knowing that most of the industrialized countries have eliminated it ... I just felt it was time to repeal it,” Young said after the vote Wednesday.
OPINION
May 13, 2013
Like me, Del. Neil Parrott seems to believe that any publicity is good publicity. So OK, I'll bite. Building on his tremendous success in the November election, Petitioner Parrott is having a go at the state's newly enacted law banning the death penalty. Forget his oh-fer on gay marriage, immigration, et al. His MDPetitions group announced last week it would attempt to collect the necessary signatures to put the death penalty repeal up to a statewide vote. Love the way they're using social media to further the cause.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | February 6, 2005
pepperb@herald-mail.com The decision of a Maryland jury to sentence a defendant convicted of first-degree murder to death must be weighed on the law - whether the offense meets the seriousness qualifications and whether the defendant is a serious threat to society. First-degree murder is defined as a deliberate, premeditated and willful killing; committed by lying in wait; committed by poison; or committed in the perpetration of or an attempt to perpetrate first-degree arson, first-, second- or third-degree burglary, carjacking or armed carjacking, kidnapping, mayhem, rape, robbery, first- or second-degree sex offense or sodomy, according to the Annotated Code of Maryland, Criminal Law Article, section 2-201.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 13, 2013
Like me, Del. Neil Parrott seems to believe that any publicity is good publicity. So OK, I'll bite. Building on his tremendous success in the November election, Petitioner Parrott is having a go at the state's newly enacted law banning the death penalty. Forget his oh-fer on gay marriage, immigration, et al. His MDPetitions group announced last week it would attempt to collect the necessary signatures to put the death penalty repeal up to a statewide vote. Love the way they're using social media to further the cause.
Advertisement
OPINION
By LT. GOV. ANTHONY BROWN | March 25, 2013
Earlier this month, the Maryland Legislature passed legislation abolishing the death penalty. I believe the time has come to repeal the death penalty because it is racially biased, demonstrably unreliable and not an effective deterrent. This debate is full of practical, legal and moral questions that deserve our full attention. Maryland's justice system is strong. Our law enforcement, victim and witness assistance coordinators, judges, prosecutors and corrections officers work tirelessly to keep our state safe and to ensure justice prevails.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | March 21, 2013
Attorneys' actions leading up to and at trial in 1998 underwent hours of questioning Thursday as a death row inmate seeks modifications to his conviction and sentence. Albert E. Reid, 64, formerly of Biglerville, Pa., was found guilty in the Dec. 27, 1996, killing of his estranged wife, Carla Reid, and her 14-year-old daughter Deidra Moore in a Sollenberger Road home outside Chambersburg. He has filed claims of inadequate performance from his attorneys, improper jury instructions and prosecutorial misconduct under the Post Conviction Relief Act. On Thursday morning, Reid's current attorney, Keisha Hudson, questioned one of his trial attorneys, Stephen Kulla of Waynesboro, Pa., about his choices and decisions.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | March 6, 2013
A move to repeal the death penalty in Maryland took another step forward with the state Senate voting 27-20 on Wednesday to abolish capital punishment. Every legislator in the Washington County delegation is against the repeal except Sen. Ronald N. Young, D-Frederick/Washington, who voted for the measure. “It's one that I wrestled with very deeply. But after talking to a lot of people, reading some things from some prison officials, talking to religious leaders and others, knowing that most of the industrialized countries have eliminated it ... I just felt it was time to repeal it,” Young said after the vote Wednesday.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | December 18, 2012
A death row inmate convicted in Franklin County, Pa., returned to Chambersburg on Tuesday for a hearing related to his claims of inadequate performance from his attorneys, improper jury instructions and prosecutorial misconduct. Albert E. Reid, 64, formerly of Biglerville, Pa., was found guilty in the Dec. 27, 1996, killing of his estranged wife, Carla Reid, then 36, and her 14-year-old daughter Deidra Moore in a Sollenberger Road home outside Chambersburg. On Tuesday, a specially assigned senior judge, David Grine, presided over a status conference and scheduled a pair of hearings.
NEWS
By DON AINES | February 12, 2009
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- In November, Michael B. Singley filed a petition with Franklin County Court to end appeals of his death penalty. The convicted murderer has since changed his mind, and he was in court Thursday asking to withdraw his earlier petition. "I filed that to be executed because I didn't think I would get any help" in prison, Singley said in a hearing before President Judge Douglas W. Herman. "I just ... felt I wanted to die. " "He doesn't want to die anymore," Assistant District Attorney Laura Kerstetter said after the hearing.
NEWS
by DON AINES | March 7, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. Convicted double-murderer Michael Singley was granted a stay of execution Friday by U.S. Middle District Court Judge John E. Jones III. Singley, who is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection April 6, is on death row for the Nov. 3, 1998, rape and murder of Christine Rohrer, 23, at her Elder Street home. "Not only is it not unexpected, it's virtually automatic upon the initial request for counsel," Franklin County District Attorney John F. Nelson said of the stay.
NEWS
February 7, 2006
"This is to the person who has to use three days of vacation pay because the plant is shutting down. You can thank your union for that. It's almost as if you're working for the city of Hagerstown. " - Hagerstown "I just got the assessment on my property, and it's doubled. I just can't understand it. It's as if the people around here want to get rid of the lifelong residents so these city people can come up here. I'm getting ready to retire very soon, and I can't afford all this.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | February 6, 2005
pepperb@herald-mail.com The decision of a Maryland jury to sentence a defendant convicted of first-degree murder to death must be weighed on the law - whether the offense meets the seriousness qualifications and whether the defendant is a serious threat to society. First-degree murder is defined as a deliberate, premeditated and willful killing; committed by lying in wait; committed by poison; or committed in the perpetration of or an attempt to perpetrate first-degree arson, first-, second- or third-degree burglary, carjacking or armed carjacking, kidnapping, mayhem, rape, robbery, first- or second-degree sex offense or sodomy, according to the Annotated Code of Maryland, Criminal Law Article, section 2-201.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | October 10, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Ray Krone remembers vividly last April 29 when his lawyer called him in prison and asked what he wanted to eat for supper that night. That was how Krone, 45, of Dover in York County, Pa., knew that he was finally going to be free after being imprisoned for 10 years, four months and seven days, much of it on Arizona's death row. Krone and William Nieves, another exonerated death row inmate, were the key speakers at a symposium Wednesday at Wilson College sponsored by the advocacy group Pennsylvania Abolitionists United Against the Death Penalty.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|