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NEWS
December 3, 1999
It's too bad that Maryland's dairy farmers can't turn all the hot air being expended discussing their problems into something useful. The federal lawmakers who profess to love the family farmer and hate sprawl could make progress on both issues, if they got serious about this. Unfortunately, at the Congressional level, there's been more yakety-yak than action on the matter. Though the state lost 17 of its 845 remaining dairy farms last year, next month the price of milk is set to drop by $2.50 per hundred-weight, because Congress won't give Maryland permission to join the Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact.
NEWS
By DAVID GUTMAN | Capital News Service | November 4, 2012
“You can't turn these cows on and off,” said Bill Kilby, whose family has owned a dairy farm in Cecil County, Md., since 1961. “You cannot stop feeding the cows, you've got to take care of them.” That's the simple rationale for why the federal government has continuously, since the Great Depression, passed some sort of agricultural-support legislation. Farmers, unlike computer companies or automakers, can't ramp up production when demand spikes and they can't easily decrease their expenses when prices for their products drop.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | January 27, 2000
Maryland dairy farmers say falling milk prices, caused in part by a glut in the market, and the inability to join a multistate commerce pact pose a potentially serious threat to their future. cont. from front page In Washington County, the number of dairy farms has dropped from 200 five years ago to around 160, according to Don Schwartz, a Maryland Cooperative Extension agent in the county. Other farmers can't predict how long they will last. David Herbst, a second-generation dairy farmer who runs Misty Meadow Farms in Ringgold, said it hurt his business when the basic price for 100 pounds of milk - about 11.6 gallons - as set by a federal formula, dipped from more than $16 to under $10 in just a few months.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | August 8, 2009
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Dairy farmers these days are finding their cows are making a lot of milk, but not a lot of money. They're receiving $12 to $13 for 100 pounds of milk, half of last year's rate. Industry insiders say the cause is simple -- too much supply, not enough demand. The biggest factor in the "dairy crisis" is a dramatic decrease in exports to other countries, according to Mark O'Neill of the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau. Also, sales to restaurants dropped off 40 percent, he said.
NEWS
February 17, 1997
By DAVE McMILLION Staff Writer, Martinsburg MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - About 15 Russian dairy officials will tour local dairy farms and food companies Wednesday to gain a better understanding of the industry, according to officials. The Russian delegation arriving here Wednesday will concentrate on how the dairy industry operates in a free-market economy, said Craig Yohn, a Jefferson County, W.Va., extension agent who helped organize the visit. The Russian dairy officials will learn how to set up cooperative agreements with other producers so they can pool their resources and market their products more effectively, said Yohn.
NEWS
December 20, 2007
Colleen Cashell, executive director of the United States Agriculture Department's Farm Service Agency in Washington County, announced that eligible dairy producers can sign up for the Dairy Disaster Assistance Program at the local FSA service center at 1260 Maryland Ave., Suite 107, Hagerstown. Cashell says DDAP-III will help dairy producers recover production losses resulting from a variety of adverse weather conditions in the last few years. The program provides $16 million in benefits to dairy producers for production losses that occurred between Jan. 1, 2005, and Feb. 28, 2007, because of qualifying natural disasters.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | October 16, 2007
Washington County is tucked into the Cumberland Valley and, on brisk fall days, it is not hard to understand why our ancestors would have spilled over South Mountain or drifted across the Mason-Dixon Line. At one point, this county was thought of as part of the bread basket of the nation. Many of the early settlers were of German descent and they brought with them the practice of growing wheat and spelt. If you question that, look at all the roads named "blank" Mill Road. Today, the beauty of the county continues and wheat is still grown, but dairy has replaced it as the largest segment of the agricultural landscape.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | April 30, 2004
bonnieb@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, PA. - Franklin County dairy farmers, buoyed by rebounding milk prices and a promising start to the growing season, are looking ahead to a good year. Dairyman Carl Wenger of Pleasant Hall, Pa., said he is "optimistic that we'll have an average year weather-wise, and an outstanding year price-wise for milk. It was around $17 (per hundred pounds) last time I checked. "But if history repeats itself, it won't last a long time," he said.
NEWS
January 23, 2007
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Penn State Cooperative Extension, Franklin County, announces the upcoming program "Finance 101 For Early Career Dairy Farmers. " In this small group workshop, Brad Hilty, business and information specialist for the Penn State Dairy Alliance, will focus on basic financial concepts for younger dairy producers. Topics to be addressed include evaluating business performance, benchmark analysis, communicating with your lender, and factors affecting profitability.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 5, 2013
U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency County Executive Director Colleen Cashell said beginning today USDA will issue payments to dairy farmers enrolled in the Milk Income Loss Contract program for the September 2012 milk marketings. A farm bill extension provides for a continuation of the program through Sept. 30. All dairy producers with MILC contracts are automatically extended to Sept. 30. Eligible producers, therefore, do not need to re-enroll in the program. MILC operations with approved contracts will continue to receive monthly payments, if available.
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NEWS
By DAVID GUTMAN | Capital News Service | November 4, 2012
“You can't turn these cows on and off,” said Bill Kilby, whose family has owned a dairy farm in Cecil County, Md., since 1961. “You cannot stop feeding the cows, you've got to take care of them.” That's the simple rationale for why the federal government has continuously, since the Great Depression, passed some sort of agricultural-support legislation. Farmers, unlike computer companies or automakers, can't ramp up production when demand spikes and they can't easily decrease their expenses when prices for their products drop.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | August 23, 2012
About 40 people attended a hearing Thursday afternoon about a farmer's proposal to draw up to a little more than 1 million gallons of water per day from Antietam Creek, and the discussion at times focused on overall concerns about management of the stream besides the farmer's request. The Maryland Department of Environment's Water Management Administration is considering allowing dairy farmer Dean Lehman to draw an annual average of 123,000 gallons of water per day from the creek and a maximum daily withdrawal of 1,152,000 gallons from the stream.
NEWS
July 30, 2011
Laurie Savage, a dairy farmer and communications professional from Dickerson, Md., will serve as the new scheduler for the Dairy Farmers Speakers Bureau, a program funded through the dairy checkoff program. More than 40 dairy producers have been trained through the speakers bureau to speak to community and civic groups about their role as dairy farmers in the community. The speakers bureau is a joint effort of the Pennsylvania Dairy Promotion Program, Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association and Center for Dairy Excellence.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | jsemler@umd.edu | June 14, 2011
As many of you know, June is National Dairy Month, the month we celebrate all things dairy, dairy cows, dairy products and dairy farmers. Beyond the farm gate, dairy farmers contribute so much more than milk to our community. Washington County is home to more than 11,000 dairy cows and more than 140 farms that care for them. This makes the county second only to Frederick County in the state of Maryland. Our farms average about 80 cows per herd. We all know that our farms produce milk, but did you know that dairy farms are also heavily vested in the beef industry.
NEWS
December 30, 2009
The U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced the implementation of the new Dairy Economic Loss Assistance Payment program. The Agricultural Appropriations Bill authorized $290 million for loss assistance payments to eligible dairy producers. Milk prices declined through early-to-mid-2009, with the national price for milk averaging $16.80 per hundredweight (cwt.) in the fourth quarter of 2008 and averaging $12.23 per cwt. in the first quarter of 2009, a 27-percent decline.
NEWS
December 25, 2009
ANNAPOLIS - Maryland's struggling dairy farmers stand to receive as much as $2.475 million in emergency aid provided in the 2010 Agriculture Appropriations Bill through the new Dairy Emergency Loss Assistance Payment program (DELAP). Gov. Martin O'Malley, along with governors from Northeast dairy states, actively supported the inclusion of the emergency funds in the appropriations bill to assist dairy farmers trying to stay afloat during the longest stretch of extremely low prices on record.
NEWS
December 22, 2009
HARRISBURG, Pa. -- Pennsylvania's dairy farmers will get temporary relief from low milk prices thanks to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's release of $290 million for loss assistance payments, Gov. Edward G. Rendell said Monday. The Dairy Economic Loss Assistance Program, or DELAP, will provide a one-time payment to eligible producers based on the amount of milk both produced and commercially marketed by their operation from February to July 2009. "Many of Pennsylvania's 8,600 dairy farmers face significant financial problems, having a negatively impact on our communities and our economy," Rendell said.
NEWS
November 21, 2009
o If you like reading Tim Rowland, you'll love watching him. See what else Tim has to say New York and the U.S. Justice Department aren't entities that you would normally associate with having a positive impact on Washington County land use, but in a roundabout way, it could be the case. Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., is having the Justice Department investigate milk prices, with a specific question in mind: Why are dairy farmers getting rock-bottom prices, while there has been only a minimal drop in the cost of a gallon of milk at the grocery stores?
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