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Cumin

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NEWS
February 11, 2007
1/2 cup water 1 1/2 cup chopped purple cabbage 1/4 cup peas (frozen peas are OK 1/4 teaspoon cumin, optional Virgin olive oil for dressing Cook cabbage in water until it just begins to wilt. Add peas and cumin, if desired, and cook until peas are tender. Optional: Top with virgin olive oil for dressing, as you would with salad dressing. Serves 2. - Courtesy of Simone Heurich
NEWS
February 11, 2007
For vegetables: 1/2 cup water 1 medium-sized sweet potato 1 1/2 cup chopped cauliflower 1 1/2 cup chopped broccoli 1 small yellow squash, chopped 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped red pepper 1 1/2 cup chopped collard greens, with ribs removed 5 leaves of curry (see cook's notes) 3/4 teaspoons of cumin powder 1 teaspoon coriander powder 1/4 teaspoon turmeric Dash of sea salt or soma salt 1 to 2 tablespoons of fresh cilantro, torn For roasted spice blend: 1/4 tablespoon of ghee (clarified butter)
NEWS
November 15, 2006
1 cup chopped onion 3 ribs celery, minced 1 large Granny Smith apple, coarsely chopped 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cumin 1 teaspoon sage Salt and pepper to taste 2 cups vegetable broth 1 pound stale bread, cubed or torn to pieces Heat oven to 350 degrees. Coat a 3-quart casserole dish with vegetable cooking spray. Coat a large stockpot with vegetable cooking spray. Add onion, celery and apple. Cover and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally for about 10 minutes.
NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | July 13, 2012
The summer fun continues with this delicious summer creation, blending two summer squash to bring out the best in both. The secret to this dish? Make sure your cumin and curry powder are fresh. Anything older than six months needs to be tossed out. For some flavor variations, try adding honey or using it to drizzle over the soup before serving. Or try a fruit-flavored yogurt such as peach or honey vanilla to really showcase the soup. This is a great make-ahead soup that you can store in the fridge for a delicious creamy pick-me-up the next day. Scott C. Anderson is associate food service director and chef with Shepherd University dining services in Shepherdstown, W.Va., and Chef Ambassador to the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.
NEWS
By SCOTT C. ANDERSON / Special to The Herald-Mail | August 1, 2010
Col. Henry Hastings Sibley was a hard-charging man born before the Civil War, and a man destined to deal with the hardships of life in the Midwest. In 1862, Sibley was appointed colonel of Minnesota's state militia and was directed to the upper Minnesota River to protect exposed settlements from the Sioux. His militia were involved in many American Indian engagements last of which was The Battle of Wood Lake in 1862, which ended Indian uprisings in Minnesota. To honor such a man - and at the request of great friend and fellow Civil War enthusiast - I came up with this sandwich.
NEWS
August 29, 2007
1/4 cup olive oil 1 pound new potatoes, quartered 3/4 pound winter squash, seeded and cubed 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, to taste 1/4 teaspoon cumin 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup water 1/2 cup white wine Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste Parmesan cheese, for garnish Heat the oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add the potatoes and squash and saute for 5 minutes, or until just beginning to brown.
NEWS
By Scripps Howard News Service | February 3, 2009
Preserved lemons are used in North Africa and are great gifts for cooks who enjoy the unusual. These lemons preserved in salt and lemon juice taste like nothing else. They turn sour and salty, but something else happens in the process that gives them a come-hither quality and the ability to lift a dish into a new realm. Try little pieces in greens salads, or tucked into baked sweet potatoes, cooked with greens, or added to a stew or soup. Use the lemons wherever you need a tart, spicy accent.
NEWS
By CHINA MILLMAN / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | May 3, 2009
The arrival of review copies of cookbooks always gives me a little thrill, but ripping open a thick envelope to find "A Homemade Life" was like opening a long-anticipated birthday present. Many people before me have recognized Molly Wizenberg's talent for stringing together words as well as recipes. Her blog, Orangette (orangette.blogspot.com), is one of the most widely acclaimed food blogs on the Web. Since last spring she has had a monthly column in Bon Appetit, and now she has a book, "A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes From My Kitchen Table" (Simon & Schuster, 2009)
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER | December 16, 2008
Dear Lynne: My brother deserves good spices. He is a serious cook and he finally has his own kitchen after years of roommates. As an artist, money's an issue for him, and my budget isn't huge. That said, where should I look for great-quality spices for his gifts this year? - A big "thank you" from Big Sister in Wichita Dear Big Sister: Talk about a gift that keeps on giving. He'll get months of pleasure out of this. Two sources I have used and like are www.penzeys.com (the Aleppo chile is outstanding)
NEWS
February 8, 2009
Squash soup with peppers and fresh lime Two 12-ounce packages frozen pured squash Two 14 1/2-ounce cans fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth 1 large potato, peeled and diced 1 red bell pepper, cored, seeded and finely chopped 1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and finely chopped 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro Fresh lime wedges, for serving ...
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NEWS
Scott Anderson | Culinary Passion | July 13, 2012
The summer fun continues with this delicious summer creation, blending two summer squash to bring out the best in both. The secret to this dish? Make sure your cumin and curry powder are fresh. Anything older than six months needs to be tossed out. For some flavor variations, try adding honey or using it to drizzle over the soup before serving. Or try a fruit-flavored yogurt such as peach or honey vanilla to really showcase the soup. This is a great make-ahead soup that you can store in the fridge for a delicious creamy pick-me-up the next day. Scott C. Anderson is associate food service director and chef with Shepherd University dining services in Shepherdstown, W.Va., and Chef Ambassador to the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.
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NEWS
By SCOTT C. ANDERSON / Special to The Herald-Mail | August 1, 2010
Col. Henry Hastings Sibley was a hard-charging man born before the Civil War, and a man destined to deal with the hardships of life in the Midwest. In 1862, Sibley was appointed colonel of Minnesota's state militia and was directed to the upper Minnesota River to protect exposed settlements from the Sioux. His militia were involved in many American Indian engagements last of which was The Battle of Wood Lake in 1862, which ended Indian uprisings in Minnesota. To honor such a man - and at the request of great friend and fellow Civil War enthusiast - I came up with this sandwich.
NEWS
By CHINA MILLMAN / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | May 3, 2009
The arrival of review copies of cookbooks always gives me a little thrill, but ripping open a thick envelope to find "A Homemade Life" was like opening a long-anticipated birthday present. Many people before me have recognized Molly Wizenberg's talent for stringing together words as well as recipes. Her blog, Orangette (orangette.blogspot.com), is one of the most widely acclaimed food blogs on the Web. Since last spring she has had a monthly column in Bon Appetit, and now she has a book, "A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes From My Kitchen Table" (Simon & Schuster, 2009)
NEWS
By Scripps Howard News Service | February 3, 2009
Preserved lemons are used in North Africa and are great gifts for cooks who enjoy the unusual. These lemons preserved in salt and lemon juice taste like nothing else. They turn sour and salty, but something else happens in the process that gives them a come-hither quality and the ability to lift a dish into a new realm. Try little pieces in greens salads, or tucked into baked sweet potatoes, cooked with greens, or added to a stew or soup. Use the lemons wherever you need a tart, spicy accent.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER | December 16, 2008
Dear Lynne: My brother deserves good spices. He is a serious cook and he finally has his own kitchen after years of roommates. As an artist, money's an issue for him, and my budget isn't huge. That said, where should I look for great-quality spices for his gifts this year? - A big "thank you" from Big Sister in Wichita Dear Big Sister: Talk about a gift that keeps on giving. He'll get months of pleasure out of this. Two sources I have used and like are www.penzeys.com (the Aleppo chile is outstanding)
NEWS
August 29, 2007
1/4 cup olive oil 1 pound new potatoes, quartered 3/4 pound winter squash, seeded and cubed 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, to taste 1/4 teaspoon cumin 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup water 1/2 cup white wine Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste Parmesan cheese, for garnish Heat the oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add the potatoes and squash and saute for 5 minutes, or until just beginning to brown.
NEWS
February 11, 2007
For vegetables: 1/2 cup water 1 medium-sized sweet potato 1 1/2 cup chopped cauliflower 1 1/2 cup chopped broccoli 1 small yellow squash, chopped 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped red pepper 1 1/2 cup chopped collard greens, with ribs removed 5 leaves of curry (see cook's notes) 3/4 teaspoons of cumin powder 1 teaspoon coriander powder 1/4 teaspoon turmeric Dash of sea salt or soma salt 1 to 2 tablespoons of fresh cilantro, torn For roasted spice blend: 1/4 tablespoon of ghee (clarified butter)
NEWS
February 11, 2007
1/2 cup water 1 1/2 cup chopped purple cabbage 1/4 cup peas (frozen peas are OK 1/4 teaspoon cumin, optional Virgin olive oil for dressing Cook cabbage in water until it just begins to wilt. Add peas and cumin, if desired, and cook until peas are tender. Optional: Top with virgin olive oil for dressing, as you would with salad dressing. Serves 2. - Courtesy of Simone Heurich
NEWS
November 15, 2006
1 cup chopped onion 3 ribs celery, minced 1 large Granny Smith apple, coarsely chopped 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cumin 1 teaspoon sage Salt and pepper to taste 2 cups vegetable broth 1 pound stale bread, cubed or torn to pieces Heat oven to 350 degrees. Coat a 3-quart casserole dish with vegetable cooking spray. Coat a large stockpot with vegetable cooking spray. Add onion, celery and apple. Cover and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally for about 10 minutes.
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