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by MARLO BARNHART | October 7, 2003
marlob@herald-mail.com ROHRERSVILLE - As one of four staging areas for last Sunday's South County CROP Walk, Bethel United Methodist Church decided to go all out this year to support the supporters of the humanitarian mission. The church held a luncheon at the church before the walk got under way, said Bethel Pastor Fayellen Shankle. The tasty send-off was the brainchild of several members of the congregation who have participated in the walk in the past or were planning to walk in Sunday's event.
NEWS
September 27, 2006
KEEDYSVILLE - The annual South Washington County CROP Walk will be Sunday at Taylor Park. Registration will be from 1 to 2 p.m., with walkers leaving Taylor Park via North Main Street at 2 p.m., led by members of the Rohrersville Band. The walk will turn left onto Keedy Drive, and at the intersection of Keedy Drive and Md. 34, walkers will cross with the assistance of a police officer and walk toward Boonsboro. Wheelchairs and baby buggies/strollers will not cross Md. 34, but will walk toward the Red Byrd Restaurant, turning left onto Taylor Drive and returning to Taylor Park.
NEWS
September 22, 2000
CROP walk for hunger By KATE COLEMAN / Staff Writer See also: CROP walk: If you go Have you ever been hungry? Really hungry? Not just wishing you had another piece of pizza. Not just craving a chocolate-chip cookie. continued Hungry - not enough food to eat, not enough money to afford enough food. Most Americans - 90 percent - have enough to eat. In the past few years, the number of U.S. households that experienced hunger declined by 24 percent, according to a United States Department of Agriculture report.
NEWS
October 17, 2009
Members of five Hancock churches gathered Oct. 4 at the Western Maryland Rail Trail for the annual CROP Walk to fight hunger. Churches represented included Hancock United Methodist Church, Orchard Ridge First Church of God, St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, St. Peter's Catholic Church and Hancock Presbyterian Church, whose pastor, the Rev. Carol Davis, was this year's walk coordinator.
NEWS
October 1, 2000
CROP Walk raises more than $15,000 By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI / Staff Writer A crowd of people 315 strong took to the streets of Hagerstown's North End Sunday, some walking, others running to help the hungry. The annual CROP Walk, sponsored locally by Washington County Council of Churches, raised more $15,000, said Bob Hyssong, executive director. A skate-a-thon was held in conjunction with the CROP Walk Saturday. CROP walk is a program of Church World Service, a ministry that works to fight hunger in more than 80 countries.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | September 30, 2007
A local scrapbooking store took part Saturday in a nationwide effort to raise money for breast cancer research. ScrapMania! of Hagerstown held an "all-day crop" to benefit the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. "We do this on a pretty regular basis, but this is the first time we've joined with other stores to raise money," said Sherrie Zlomke, owner of ScrapMania! The fundraiser was part of Scrap Pink, a campaign sponsored by Scrapbooks Etc. magazine to raise money for the breast cancer foundation.
LIFESTYLE
October 23, 2012
Madalyn Gardenhour, 12, helped her grandmother dig sweet potatoes form their organic garden near Smithsburg. Among their crop was this 7-pound, 4- ounce giant.
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | April 22, 2008
Spring has sprung and with the arrival of warmer temperatures last week the cereal rye crop has rapidly begun to grow and develop. Stan Fultz, dairy extension agent from Frederick County, and I were working in our forage plots last week and we noticed how fast our rye cover crop was taking off. I know in some areas this crop is quickly approaching knee height. This indicates that the harvest for highest quality forages is just around the corner. Are you ready? Many dairy producers have adopted management practices to maximize forage quality and yields from ryelage.
NEWS
August 9, 2004
CROP meetings, events scheduled The Washington County Council of Churches is announcing the schedule of activities to raise awareness and money to fight hunger through Church World Services/CROP and for local food banks for 2004. On Thursday at 7 p.m., an organizational meeting for all CROP recruiters will be held in Fellowship Hall of Trinity Lutheran Church, Randolph and North Potomac streets, Hagerstown. The purpose of the meeting is to provide all recruiters and interested groups with information and sponsor packets for the three upcoming CROP activities - a walk, bike hike and skate-a-thon for hunger.
NEWS
August 22, 2006
McCONNELLSBURG, Pa. - Loan deficiency payments are available to Fulton County farmers who have produced eligible commodities on a farm that's met federal requirements, an official said. The payment rates are available now on 2006 crop barley, grain sorghum and corn, including corn silage, said John K. Johnston, head of the Farm Service Agency office in Fulton County. "Contact the county FSA office prior to selling or feeding your crop if you want a payment," Johnston said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 25, 2013
One week ago today was National Agriculture Day. We should all know that food and fiber doesn't just arrive at the grocery or clothing store ... or magically appear on our dinner table or in our closet. There's an entire industry dedicated to providing plentiful and safe food for consumption, as well as a wide range of comfortable, fashionable clothing choices. We rely on agriculture for the very necessities of life. From beef and pork, to cotton and corn, agriculture is working harder than ever to meet the needs of Americans and others around the world.
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NEWS
January 13, 2013
Penn State Extension specialists and industry representatives will be at Rhodes Grove Camp and Conference Center, 7693 Browns Mill Road in Chambersburg, on Thursday, Jan. 31. Registration begins at 8 a.m. and the sessions begin at 9 a.m. Topics to be covered are world agriculture and risk management, grain crops, improving soybean yields, manure management, making sense of nitrogen credits, forage crop weed management, pests of 2012, seed technology...
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | October 25, 2012
Lewis Orchards Field Manager Steven Lewis says this year has been one of the best years for the farm's pumpkin patch. “We have the nicest and one of the most abundant crops of pumpkins we've had in a long while,” he said. “We planted about three acres of pumpkins, and business has been very good with the sales of pumpkins this year.” Lewis said the season has been great in terms of the amount and the size of the pumpkins. The quality of the pumpkins is also a major reason for the season's success.
LIFESTYLE
October 23, 2012
Madalyn Gardenhour, 12, helped her grandmother dig sweet potatoes form their organic garden near Smithsburg. Among their crop was this 7-pound, 4- ounce giant.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | October 7, 2012
The Waynesboro Area YMCA buzzed with activity Sunday as the doors opened for the center's annual Fun Day and the launching point for the 41st annual CROP Hunger Walk in Waynesboro. Visitors could use the climbing wall, participate in Les Mills fitness programs, take racquetball lessons, watch gymnastics and cheerleading demonstrations, have their faces painted and tour the wellness center. Several dozen people gathered outside to step off for the CROP Hunger Walk, which raises about $5,000 each year in Waynesboro.
NEWS
October 2, 2012
Use of cover crops to reduce the impact of drought on field crops will be discussed during an evening workshop at the Lyle Tabb farm on Oct. 16. Benefits of cover crops include soil moisture retention, weed control, reduced fertilizer application, reduced soil erosion and overall improved soil quality which results in improved profitability, according to a news release from the Eastern Panhandle Conservation District. The workshop will be held at 5 p.m. at the farm, which is east of Leetown off Paines Ford Road.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | August 23, 2012
About 40 people attended a hearing Thursday afternoon about a farmer's proposal to draw up to a little more than 1 million gallons of water per day from Antietam Creek, and the discussion at times focused on overall concerns about management of the stream besides the farmer's request. The Maryland Department of Environment's Water Management Administration is considering allowing dairy farmer Dean Lehman to draw an annual average of 123,000 gallons of water per day from the creek and a maximum daily withdrawal of 1,152,000 gallons from the stream.
NEWS
May 21, 2012
Colleen Cashell, Washington County Farm Service Agency executive director, reminds area farmers that enrollment for the Direct and Counter-Cyclical Program and the Average Crop Revenue Election Program ends June 1. Producers who choose to participate in either the revenue-based ACRE safety net or the price-based DCP safety net must enroll their eligible farms each year. All owners and operators who will share in the DCP or ACRE payments on the farm must sign up by June 1. Since 2009, producers have had the option to participate in DCP or ACRE.
NEWS
February 12, 2012
The problem: “Someone should research the reason behind the horrific smell around Antietam Battlefield,” Kendra Harmon wrote in an email. “The smell on most days in Sharpsburg and behind the battlefield on Old Keedysville road is unbearable!” Harmon said she heard the smell was coming from rotting vegetables and wondered why they were left to rot instead of being harvested. Who could fix it: National Park Service What they say: The smell is coming from white radishes that were planted as a winter cover crop for soil- conservation purposes, said Ed Wenschhof, chief ranger at Antietam National Battlefield.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | September 4, 2011
The prevalence of stink bugs and their related damage to crops in Washington County appears to be less severe as in past years, according to local agricultural experts. But the infestation of the bugs is spotty and there is a concern that the insects might cause more crop damage as the region moves into fall. “(It's) the apple crop we're worried about,” said University of Maryland Extension agriculture educator Jeff Semler. The stink bug - which migrated from Asia about 10 years ago - has become the bane of farmers thanks to its voracious appetite for tomatoes, peaches, apples, soybeans and corn.
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