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LIFESTYLE
February 5, 2013
Nearly 30 years ago, Marilyn Hembrock and her husband moved to the Smithsburg area. Her husband pastored a church and Hembrock taught school in Montgomery County, Md. But earlier, the couple spent time in Europe with the United States military. "He was an Army chaplain," Marilyn Hembrock said. "We were stationed in Germany 40 years ago. That's when I got interested in gingerbread houses and German pastries. Also, they had a lot of interesting chocolate candies. " Making food comes easy to Hembrock.
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EDUCATION
December 16, 2012
Potomac Heights Elementary School recently honored 12 students for exemplifying the character traits of a good citizen. The students were rewarded with an ice cream sundae session with counselor Jacklyn Kinzer.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2012
Name of business: Sweet Pea Dessert Owners: Corry Eagler and Arelis Torres Address: 10 W. Baltimore St., Greencastle, Pa. Opened: Oct. 7, 2011 Products and services: Baked goods, including cupcakes, brownies and cookies, as well as cake pops, chocolate candies, custom-order cakes and Pennsylvania State University Creamery ice cream. Cupcake bar open on Fridays and Saturdays, where patrons can customize cupcakes with a variety of fillings, frostings and toppings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2012
The Top Five Wind Down Friday The Rhythm Kings with Kim Tantillo will perform. 6 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17, at The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., downtown Hagerstown. $5; $2, ages 12 and younger. A luminaria ceremony by the American Cancer Society will be held. Luminaria will be sold for $10 each from 6 to 9 p.m. Go to www.mdtheatre.org . 'Annie' wraps up A musical about Little Orphan Annie, a spunky girl adopted by a business tycoon. 6 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17, and Saturday, Aug. 18. Washington County Playhouse Dinner Theater, 44 N. Potomac St., downtown Hagerstown.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | July 25, 2012
By the end of Wednesday night, production was expected to be over at the Unilever ice cream plant on Frederick Street and the 391 employees who will lose their jobs were dealing with the shutdown with “mixed emotions,” according to a plant worker who is also a United Steelworkers union official. “I'm glad it's over so I can move on with my life,” Teal Beard, who has had the prospect of the plant closure hanging over his head for three years, said Wednesday. Beard, who has worked 21 years at the plant doing stocking and forklift work in a freezer unit, said he did not have any plans beyond taking some time off and enjoying the rest of the summer.
NEWS
Cheryl Weaver | Around Clear Spring | July 3, 2012
St. Paul's United Methodist Church in Big Pool will hold a homemade ice cream festival   Saturday, July 14, at 6 p.m. Tickets cost $5 per person.  In addition to ice cream, hot dogs, steamers and a cake walk will be available.  Teacher to lead library program Dream big at the Leonard P. Snyder Memorial Library in Clear Spring.  Science teacher Jeff Byard will lead science experiments at the library from July 10...
NEWS
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | alnotarianni@aol.com | June 2, 2012
John Herbst remembers the early Ringgold Ruritan Strawberry Festivals more than 50 years ago. A charter member of the club, Herbst, 89, and his wife Betty, 90, used to take their children with them to the old schoolhouse to make homemade strawberry ice cream. Right up through last year, Herbst dipped ice cream at the fundraiser. This year, he decided to pass on the scoop. “I finished it. My son does it now,” he said. The elder Herbsts owned and operated Smithsburg's Misty Meadow Farms.
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | March 5, 2012
About five years ago, farmer David Herbst and his family had a big decision to make. With two of his four children - married with kids of their own - wanting to continue the family business of operating Misty Meadow Farm on the outskirts of Smithsburg, they either needed to drastically increase their dairy production or undertake more custom-crop farming to support everyone. “We needed to go to 600 cows if we wanted to support these other families,” Herbst said, saying the idea was met with great resistance by his daughter, who handles most of the milking of their 160 cows.
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