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NEWS
By CATHERINE SUDUE | July 24, 2007
Growing the next generation of farmers Betsy Herbst stood behind a fenced area as her 16-month-old grandson, Kaleb Long, played a game of chase with a pygmy goat and her two kids. The director and coordinator of activities within the tent that houses the Ag Ventures and Birthing Center, Herbst said the expo is a great place for children to learn about agriculture and the food they eat. "Food doesn't start in the grocery store. It starts with cows, pigs and chickens," said Herbst, of Williamsport.
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NEWS
by STACEY DANZUSO | February 18, 2003
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Heavy snow caused two Franklin County barns to collapse Monday afternoon, killing and injuring several cows, according to emergency officials. Units from the Blue Ridge Summit, Pa., and Waynesboro, Pa., fire departments responded to 14164 Harbaugh Church Road in Washington Township, where several head of cattle were trapped and injured, said Richie Haywood, captain of the Blue Ridge Summit Fire Department. "We just lifted the roof and debris off the cattle to get them free," he said.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | June 6, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. -- Four cattle were killed during Wednesday's torrential storm in Jefferson County when a barn along Kabletown Road collapsed on the animals, according to the county's emergency manager. The owner of the cattle put the animals in the barn to protect them from flying debris in the storm, Barbara Miller said. When the barn collapsed, three pregnant cows and a young bull were killed, Miller said. Two other pregnant cows that were injured had to be euthanized and two other injured cows were still being assessed, Miller said.
NEWS
October 9, 2007
FREDERICK, Md. - Two area youths have been awarded $500 grants to help them with their future agricultural endeavors. The 2007 Agriculture Industry Youth Grants were awarded by the Agriculture Business Council and the Frederick County Office of Economic Development. The grant winners are Ben Murphy and Kristin Zimmerman. Ben, 18, is a freshman at Ohio State Agricultural Technical Institute. His project is to expand his beef cattle business by implementing the practice of Artificial Insemination on his cow herd.
NEWS
September 9, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - The Franklin Fall Farm Fun Fest will be Saturday, Sept. 20, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. This year's hosts will be Reich-Dale Farms, owned by Ed and Frances Reichard and family, and the Appalachian Nurseries, owned by Tom McCloud. Reich-Dale Farm is a dairy farm on Hades Church Road that milks about 95 cows and produces about 5,000 pounds of milk per day. Participants can go on wagon tours of the farm, visit dairy cows up close and pet baby calves. There will be free milk and ice cream for all visitors.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | June 10, 2008
You can hardly have a farm without cows, can you? Of course not, although it would certainly be less stressful. At least it's stressful if you get some of those cows that, in my view, are high maintenance, always having to be milked. Or sheltered, or fed, or watered. My job is demanding enough, I don't want my livestock to be the same way. So I set out to discover the least labor-intensive breed of cattle in existence, and my research led me to the "Belted Galloway," one of a number of interesting heritage breeds that are outside of the Angus/Holstein mainstream.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE, Waynesboro | June 1, 1998
by Kevin G. Gilbert / staff photographer see enlargment LEMASTERS, Pa. - Not too long ago, feeding dairy cows meant growing a few simple grains and feeding them to the animals. Now, dairy operations use formulas so complicated that many farmers hire professional nutritionists to work out the best menu for their herds. Modern feed mixing mills like Snider's Elevator Inc., in Lemasters, use computerized mixing systems to come up with formulas for the proper mix of vitamins, minerals and silage for all kinds of cows.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | January 13, 2005
bonnieb@herald-mail.com HARRISBURG, Pa. - Several Franklin County families are showing off their agricultural prowess at the 89th annual Pennsylvania Farm Show in Harrisburg this week. With 25 acres under roof, the Farm Show is the largest agricultural event in the country. About 400,000 spectators and competitors are expected to attend. Spectators can see a myriad ag-related exhibits, including a bison, alpacas named Alonso and Ampato, prize-winning chocolate cakes and apple pies, quilts, birds of prey, fruits and vegetables, school exhibits and uncountable numbers of chickens, rabbits, horses, cows, goats and sheep.
NEWS
By DON AINES | July 6, 1999
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Lisa Meyers has seen cows panting and Frank Barr's corn didn't get fence high by the Fourth of July. [cont. from news page ] The heat wave in Franklin County hasn't set records in recent days, but dairy cattle are feeling the heat and giving less milk. Some stands of corn are stunted by the heat and dry conditions. Rodney Meyers, Lisa's husband, has seen production drop among the 60 cows at his father's 190-acre Aldina Holstein Farm in Greene Township.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | July 11, 2010
Gardeners can conserve water, keep plants alive It was Wednesday at 2 p.m., and temperatures in the Tri-State area were creeping toward 100 degrees for a third straight day. Crops in Washington County, Franklin County, Pa., and Jefferson County, W.Va., were wilting in the sun and farmers were looking to the skies for the cooling relief of rain, which didn't fall. "I don't remember it being warm like this for a long time," said Matt Harsh, owner of Chesley Vegetable Farm in Smithsburg.
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