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NEWS
November 21, 1997
Whooping cough By Teri Johnson Staff Writer Some say "hooping," and others say "hwooping. " However you pronounce it - and both are correct - whooping cough is an illness named for its violent coughing spasms. The disease, also known by the scientific name of pertussis, is defined by a whooping noise at the end of a cough, says Dr. Robert Parker, county health officer for Washington County Health Department. "It's not a run-of-the-mill cough," Parker says.
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NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | June 9, 2006
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County Health Department officials said they have detected another case of whooping cough in the county. The case was detected within the last week, health officials said in a news release. Health officials said previously that several cases of whooping cough have been detected in Jefferson County. Parents of children were being urged to review their children's' immunization records to make sure their kids are protected from the disease. The cases have occurred in individuals who have not been vaccinated, officials said.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | September 4, 2006
Adults and teens might be lacking adequate protection from what is often viewed as a childhood illness, pertussis - the highly infectious bacterial disease known as whooping cough, according to health officials. Bordetella pertussis, the bacteria that causes pertussis, attaches to the lungs, producing toxins and inflaming the respiratory tract. The initial stage of the disease is characterized by sneezing and a mild cough, like a common cold. A high-pitched "whooping" cough comes in the latter stage of the disease.
LIFESTYLE
By BOB GARVER | Special to The Herald-Mail | November 1, 2011
Seven years ago, swarthy assassin-turned-good-guy Puss in Boots (Antonio Banderas) stole the show in "Shrek 2. "  The film itself was clever and funny, but Puss made it even better.   As the series went along, the films became much worse and Puss became less appealing along with them. Now the decision has been made to remove the ogres from the equation and see if the films are any better with Puss center stage.   The resulting film is about as unfunny as the lesser "Shrek" movies and proves that their critical failure had less to do with the choice of characters and more to do with the choice of writers.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | May 18, 2006
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Several cases of whooping cough have been detected in Jefferson County, W.Va., in the past week and parents of children are being urged to review their children's immunization records to make sure their kids are protected from the disease, Jefferson County Health Department officials said. The cases have occurred in individuals who have not been vaccinated, officials said. Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, can be a serious disease, especially among children, although deaths are rare, according to a news release from the health department.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | December 16, 2011
The Humane Society of Washington County is asking people to wait until after Dec. 29 to turn in dogs at its shelter, due to a recurrence of kennel cough. Kennel cough, or bordetella, is the common name for canine tracheobronchitis, the humane society said in a news release Friday. It is a highly contagious disease that affects dogs and is most commonly identified by a dry hacking cough that may resemble honking, the release said. Katherine Cooker, a spokeswoman for the humane society, said in an email that it is the second time this year that the shelter has dealt with the disease.
NEWS
January 19, 2012
Health officials in Berkeley and Morgan counties in the Eastern Panhandle and Hancock County in the state's Northern Panhandle are investigating outbreaks of whooping cough. Berkeley County Health Officer Diana Gaviria told the Berkeley County Council Thursday morning that they have documented 11 confirmed cases of pertussis among preschool and school-age children since November. "Fortunately, it doesn't seem to be showing any antibiotic resistance, it's easily treated," Gaviria said in an interview after the council meeting.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | November 7, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com So you've got a cold and you're shopping for medicine to relieve your symptoms. These days it's a little easier, thanks to U.S. Food and Drug Administration-required label changes in the late 1990s. The FDA required that over-the-counter medications, such as cold medications, list the active ingredients and specify what each is supposed to do. But some cold medications might still be a bit confusing or perplexing, like Robitussin Cough that contains both a cough suppressant and an expectorant.
NEWS
May 8, 2009
Information courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention The novel H1N1 flu virus is causing illness in infected persons in the United States and countries around the world. The CDC expects that illnesses may continue for some time. As a result, you or people around you may become ill. If so, you need to recognize the symptoms and know what to do. The symptoms of this new H1N1 flu virus in people are similar to the symptoms of ordinary, seasonal flu and include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | January 12, 2013
With flu cases on the rise in Washington County, Meritus Medical Center officials are asking people not to visit patients in the hospital and the Washington County Health Department plans to hold four flu vaccination clinics over the next two weeks. Meritus Health issued a press release Friday encouraging people, especially those who have flu-like symptoms or who are vulnerable to the flu, to forego visits to patients in the hospital. “This is an effort to keep patients and visitors safe,” Meritus Health Communications Manager Nicole Jovel said.
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