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Corn Syrup

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LIFESTYLE
April 12, 2011
Ever since Stacy Horst was a little girl, her mother has prepared a special treat for her family's Easter baskets — O'Henry Bars. She shared these delicious bars with friends and family and, of course, she would leave one out for the Easter Bunny to enjoy with his carrots. Horst's mother has always enjoyed cooking and baking and this recipe is a family favorites. During Lent, the Christian season of fasting and penitence before Easter, Horst's family often abstained from sweets.
NEWS
September 30, 2008
1 cup light corn syrup 1 cup sugar 1 cup Nutella (chocolate-hazelnut spread) 6 cups crisp rice cereal Lightly grease a 9-by-13-inch pan. In a Dutch oven over medium heat, cook the corn syrup, sugar and Nutella, stirring often until the sugar is melted. Remove from the heat and add the cereal. Toss well, coating all of the cereal. Transfer the mixture to the pan and push down to form an even layer in the pan. Let cool for 30 minutes and cut into 20 bars. - "The NFL Gameday Cookbook" by Ray Lampe (Chronicle, $24.95)
NEWS
April 24, 2005
Do you know what's in the food you eat? The Herald-Mail Co. will award $50 to the person who can correctly name the food product that matches each of the following 10 ingredient lists. Ingredients are listed just about how they appear on specific products - minus information in parentheses - so be specific with your answers. Here are some other rules: - Herald-Mail employees and their relatives are not eligible to participate. - The individual who correctly names the most products will win. - If there's a tie, one winner will be drawn randomly from those who qualify.
NEWS
April 27, 2005
Do you know what's in the food you eat? The Herald-Mail Co. will award $50 to the person who can correctly name the food product that matches each of the following 10 ingredient lists. Ingredients are listed just about how they appear on specific products - minus information in parentheses - so be specific with your answers. Here are some other rules: Herald-Mail employees and their relatives are not eligible to participate. The individual who correctly names the most products will win. If there's a tie, one winner will be drawn randomly from those who qualify.
NEWS
April 20, 2005
Do you know what's in the food you eat? The Herald-Mail Co. will award $50 to the person who can correctly name the food product that matches each of the following 10 ingredient lists. Ingredients are listed just about how they appear on specific products - minus information in parentheses - so be specific with your answers. Here are some other rules: · Herald-Mail employees and their relatives are not eligible to participate. · The individual who correctly names the most products will win. · If there's a tie, one winner will be drawn randomly from those who qualify.
NEWS
May 19, 2004
Here are the correct answers for the ingredients contest: 1. Grey Poupon Dijon Mustard - water, vinegar, mustard seed, salt, white wine, fruit pectin, citric acid, tartaric acid, sugar, spice. 2. Classico Traditional Basil Pesto Sauce & Spread - basil, soybean oil, garlic, Romano cheese (cultured part skim milk, salt, enzymes, cellulose), olive oil, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, spice, salt, lactic acid, torula yeast, citric acid, pine nuts, natural flavors. 3. Near East Couscous Mix, Original Flavor - precooked medium grain semolina.
NEWS
October 25, 2006
Pumpkin layer 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 medium-sized baking pumpkin or cushaw squash 1/3 cup sugar 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice (available at grocery store) 1 9-inch unbaked pie shell Pecan layer 2/3 cup corn syrup 2 eggs, lightly beaten 1/2 cup sugar 3 tablespoons butter, melted 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup pecan halves To prepare the pumpkin layer, cut pumpkin (or squash) into halves, removing the seeds and stem. Bake in oven for 350 degrees for 25 to 35 minutes until the pumpkin is fork tender.
NEWS
October 15, 2003
12 large apples 12 popsicle sticks or small dowel rods 1/2 cup unsalted butter 1 1/4 cups half and half 2 cups dark brown sugar or granulated sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla (see note) 3/4 cup light corn syrup Clean apples well, and dry. Insert sticks. Place on a baking sheet or tray coated with nonstick cooking spray or butter. Refrigerate. Bring butter, sugar, corn syrup and 1/2 of the half and half to a light boil in a heavy, 3-quart saucepan over medium heat.
NEWS
October 17, 2008
These easy, no-bake cookies are chewy, crunchy and chocolatey all at once. The recipe calls for dried cranberries and dates, but any chopped dried fruit can be substituted. CHERRY CHOCOLATE CLUSTERS Start to finish: 30 minutes Makes 5 dozen cookies 1-pound package cream-filled chocolate cookies (such as Oreo or Newman-O's) 1 stick (1/2 cup) butter 3 tablespoons light corn syrup 11 1/2-ounce bag dark chocolate chips 1/2 cup dried cranberries 1 cup chopped dried dates 30 candied cherries, cut in half Line a baking sheet or large, flat platter with parchment or waxed paper.
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LIFESTYLE
April 23, 2013
  Double Chocolate Summer Berry Cupcakes 3 ounces semi sweet chocolate chips 1 1/2 cups hot brewed Starbucks vanilla coffee 3 cups sugar 2 1/2 cups all purpose flour 1 1/2 cups unsweetened cocoa powder 2 teaspoons baking soda 3/4 teaspoons baking powder 1 1/4 teaspoons salt 3 large eggs 3/4 cup vegetable oil 1 1/2 cups buttermilk 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract Preheat oven to 350 degrees....
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NEWS
Chad Smith | October 28, 2011
With all the debate over high-fructose corn syrup and its effects on health and obesity, the Corn Refiner's Association has actually applied to change the name of the product to simply "corn sugar. " Change the name, and it's still, well, sugar. Consuming too much refined sugar in any form isn't healthy. It adds to the calorie density of food, and quickly raises blood-sugar levels. What makes corn syrup seem so bad is that it's the most commonly used sweetener for most of the foods on the grocery shelves.
OPINION
October 3, 2011
“This is in reference to relocating the senior citizen center, and there are no funds for a senior center. Well, I think those county commissioners better get on the ball. You know, the senior citizens put money into the county, city, state, for many, many years, and I think they'd better put some of the things that they fund on the back burner, because that is worthless. So get that senior center moved and built. County commissioners, take care of the seniors before you become a senior.” - Hagerstown “Someone should teach The Herald-Mail editorial writer what the meaning of 'debates' is. There's a 'for' and 'against.' Who was against federal government in education?
NEWS
By JEFF SEMLER | jsemler@umd.edu | September 27, 2011
The air has changed and there is a bit of a chill now, especially in the evening. This is a sure sign fall is here and with it harvest, the time when farmers glean their fields for the season's return and lamp posts and porches don corn stalks and pumpkins. At this point in the year, farmers will be harvesting corn and soybeans. Most of the areas dairy farmers have already filled their silos with corn silage and are joining their neighbors in shelling the remainder of the corn as grain.
NEWS
July 12, 2011
Special to The Herald-Mail   Your mother always told you that breakfast was the most important meal of the day.   As usual, Mom was right. There are many physical and mental benefits to eating breakfast every day. Many documented studies have shown that people who choose to eat breakfast on a regular basis have healthier weights, lower BMI (Body Mass Index) and also have shown improved concentration and performance, whether it be in the classroom or in the office.
LIFESTYLE
April 12, 2011
Ever since Stacy Horst was a little girl, her mother has prepared a special treat for her family's Easter baskets — O'Henry Bars. She shared these delicious bars with friends and family and, of course, she would leave one out for the Easter Bunny to enjoy with his carrots. Horst's mother has always enjoyed cooking and baking and this recipe is a family favorites. During Lent, the Christian season of fasting and penitence before Easter, Horst's family often abstained from sweets.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE / Special to The Herald-Mail | November 18, 2009
Halloween is the start of the "sugar season," with Thanksgiving and Christmas not far behind. Today, sugar is used in food processing, and it is stirred in and sprinkled on foods made at home. White table sugar is made from sugar beets or sugar cane. Sugar is naturally present in fruit and honey in the form of fructose and in milk as lactose. We don't usually eat sugar by the spoonful but rather use it as an ingredient in foods we make or buy. Sugar contributes moisture, texture, color and bulk to baked goods.
NEWS
By CHAD SMITH | November 17, 2008
You might have seen the recent commercials on TV that are promoting alleged facts about high fructose corn syrup. These commercials claim that since high fructose corn syrup is made from corn, it is actually healthy if consumed in moderation. Well, I have some contrary facts I'd like you to read. First, I'll tell you exactly what high fructose corn syrup (HFCS for short) is. Here's how it works: HFCS is made by changing the sugar (glucose) in cornstarch to fructose, another sugar.
NEWS
October 17, 2008
These easy, no-bake cookies are chewy, crunchy and chocolatey all at once. The recipe calls for dried cranberries and dates, but any chopped dried fruit can be substituted. CHERRY CHOCOLATE CLUSTERS Start to finish: 30 minutes Makes 5 dozen cookies 1-pound package cream-filled chocolate cookies (such as Oreo or Newman-O's) 1 stick (1/2 cup) butter 3 tablespoons light corn syrup 11 1/2-ounce bag dark chocolate chips 1/2 cup dried cranberries 1 cup chopped dried dates 30 candied cherries, cut in half Line a baking sheet or large, flat platter with parchment or waxed paper.
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