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Cooking Oil

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NEWS
August 18, 2000
Cooking oil used to free teen trapped in cave By DON AINES / Staff Writer, Chambersburg MONT ALTO, Pa. - A few ounces of Pocahontas cooking oil helped free a teenage girl trapped deep within a Guilford Township cave Thursday, according to Mont Alto Volunteer Fire Co. officials. continued "After we got her lubed up and the rope around her she slid right out," fire company Lt. Shawn Adolini said. He said the girl had been trapped in the cave for more than four hours, but appeared to be all right except for a mild case of hypothermia.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | January 3, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. ? Students and staff at the Franklin County Career and Technology Center made biodiesel fuel that successfully powered a tractor-trailer engine Thursday. "First, we had to get used cooking oil, and then we had to mix lye and ethanol," said Robert Sellers, a senior from Chambersburg who is enrolled in the diesel mechanics program. The endeavor is a two-day process because some of the steps require hours of mixing, instructor Kevin Grove said. "We've been really interested in alternative energy here," said Jim Duffey, administrative director at the career center.
NEWS
November 20, 2009
Recycle cooking oil, grease With deep-frying turkey a current fad, the need to manage cooking oils that get poured down the drain increases. Washington County's 40-West Landfill is accepting used and unused cooking oils and greases for recycling from county residents. Any type of liquid vegetable oil used in residential kitchens, such as peanut, corn, canola, olive, and safflower oil will be accepted for recycling, along with animal-based cooking greases like bacon grease, renderings, and lard.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | January 4, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Students and staff at the Franklin County Career and Technology Center made biodiesel fuel that successfully powered a tractor-trailer engine Thursday. "First, we had to get used cooking oil, and then we had to mix lye and ethanol," said Robert Sellers, a senior from Chambersburg who is enrolled in the diesel mechanics program. The endeavor is a two-day process because some of the steps require hours of mixing, instructor Kevin Grove said. "We've been really interested in alternative energy here," said Jim Duffey, administrative director at the center.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | July 24, 2005
bonnieb@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa.-Matt Steiman doesn't have to go to the gas station very often. His farm truck and his personal car run on homemade fuel, which he mixes up in a 50-gallon vat at the cost of about $1 per gallon. The truck, which has a full-size engine, gets 21 miles per gallon, and his car gets 40 mpg, about the same as they would get on gasoline. More important than the savings, though, Steiman said, "is the feeling of making your own fuel and driving away with it. " On Saturday, he showed other people how to do the same thing.
NEWS
April 28, 2004
Blackened Steak Roger Martin, owner of Penn Avenue Meats in Hagerstown, uses Louisiana chef and cookbook author Paul Prudhomme's seasonings to blacken steak. He doesn't recommend the technique for chicken, which is too likely to overcook, or fish, which falls apart easily. Martin fires up his grill and preheats a cast-iron skillet. The skillet is necessary to form the blackened crust on the meat, Martin said. He prepares the steak for blackening by coating both sides with melted butter.
NEWS
by JEFF SEMLER | October 3, 2006
The air has changed and there is a little of a chill now, especially in the evening. This is a sure sign fall is here and, with, it harvest - the time when farmers glean their fields for the season's return and lampposts and porches don cornstalks and pumpkins. At this point in the year, farmers are harvesting corn and soybeans. Many of the area's dairy farmers have already filled their silos with corn silage and are joining their neighbors in shelling the remainder of the corn as grain.
NEWS
August 24, 2000
Police log for Aug. 25 Purse-snatching at home reported to Pa. authorities CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - An intruder snatched a woman's purse early Thursday at her home, according to Chambersburg police. Police said Vickie Pensinger was washing dishes in the kitchen of her North Franklin Street home at 2:40 a.m. when she heard someone rattling the locked kitchen door. She yelled at the person and then left the kitchen to get her husband, police said. While she was out of the kitchen, the intruder pushed through the screen on the kitchen door and grabbed her denim purse from a stand near the door, police said.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | June 26, 2009
Dear Lynne: I'm thinking about learning to cook Indian food and have been browsing recipes. It seems that a lot of recipes call for "ghee" instead of cooking oil. Can I use oil in its place? -- Angela from Stillwater Dear Angela: You can substitute vegetable oil in most recipes calling for ghee. Use an oil with a high smoke point, like canola or peanut. That said, I think you should take a leap and try making your own ghee. It has a nutty, meaty flavor that adds a lot to a dish.
NEWS
July 20, 2002
Editor's note - Please be as brief as possible when calling Mail Call, The Daily Mail's reader call-in line. Mail Call is not staffed on weekends or holidays so it is best to call Mail Call during the week. The Mail Call number is 301-791-6236. You are welcome to leave a recorded message on any subject, but some calls will be screened out. Here are some' of the calls we have received lately: "Does anyone else watch 'Guiding Light?' I am so tired of the writers making Reva Shane such a drama queen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
LIFESTYLE
March 6, 2012
The Washington County Forty West Landfill now accepts used and unused cooking oils from county residents for recycling. Commercial oils will not be accepted from restaurants or other businesses. Cooking oils may be brought to the recycling area during normal facility hours, and placed into the designated tank adjacent to the recycle lot attendant building. Any type of liquid vegetable oil may be accepted for recycling such as peanut, corn, canola, olive and safflower. Animal fats and grease will not be accepted.
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NEWS
November 20, 2009
Recycle cooking oil, grease With deep-frying turkey a current fad, the need to manage cooking oils that get poured down the drain increases. Washington County's 40-West Landfill is accepting used and unused cooking oils and greases for recycling from county residents. Any type of liquid vegetable oil used in residential kitchens, such as peanut, corn, canola, olive, and safflower oil will be accepted for recycling, along with animal-based cooking greases like bacon grease, renderings, and lard.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | June 26, 2009
Dear Lynne: I'm thinking about learning to cook Indian food and have been browsing recipes. It seems that a lot of recipes call for "ghee" instead of cooking oil. Can I use oil in its place? -- Angela from Stillwater Dear Angela: You can substitute vegetable oil in most recipes calling for ghee. Use an oil with a high smoke point, like canola or peanut. That said, I think you should take a leap and try making your own ghee. It has a nutty, meaty flavor that adds a lot to a dish.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | January 4, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Students and staff at the Franklin County Career and Technology Center made biodiesel fuel that successfully powered a tractor-trailer engine Thursday. "First, we had to get used cooking oil, and then we had to mix lye and ethanol," said Robert Sellers, a senior from Chambersburg who is enrolled in the diesel mechanics program. The endeavor is a two-day process because some of the steps require hours of mixing, instructor Kevin Grove said. "We've been really interested in alternative energy here," said Jim Duffey, administrative director at the center.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | January 3, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. ? Students and staff at the Franklin County Career and Technology Center made biodiesel fuel that successfully powered a tractor-trailer engine Thursday. "First, we had to get used cooking oil, and then we had to mix lye and ethanol," said Robert Sellers, a senior from Chambersburg who is enrolled in the diesel mechanics program. The endeavor is a two-day process because some of the steps require hours of mixing, instructor Kevin Grove said. "We've been really interested in alternative energy here," said Jim Duffey, administrative director at the career center.
NEWS
November 6, 2007
"To Clear Spring, who was complaining about everybody being mean to poor little Hillary: Get over it. She is running for a position where she will need to be tough. What she has been dealt is nothing compared to what she has dealt this administration. If she can't stand the heat, she needs to get out of the kitchen. " "In response to Hagerstown's idea of taking the worst bridges in the country and naming it after George W. Bush: What a perfectly stupid idea. " "Good idea, I suppose to detain the hard-core child molesters.
NEWS
by JEFF SEMLER | October 3, 2006
The air has changed and there is a little of a chill now, especially in the evening. This is a sure sign fall is here and, with, it harvest - the time when farmers glean their fields for the season's return and lampposts and porches don cornstalks and pumpkins. At this point in the year, farmers are harvesting corn and soybeans. Many of the area's dairy farmers have already filled their silos with corn silage and are joining their neighbors in shelling the remainder of the corn as grain.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | July 24, 2005
bonnieb@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa.-Matt Steiman doesn't have to go to the gas station very often. His farm truck and his personal car run on homemade fuel, which he mixes up in a 50-gallon vat at the cost of about $1 per gallon. The truck, which has a full-size engine, gets 21 miles per gallon, and his car gets 40 mpg, about the same as they would get on gasoline. More important than the savings, though, Steiman said, "is the feeling of making your own fuel and driving away with it. " On Saturday, he showed other people how to do the same thing.
NEWS
April 28, 2004
Blackened Steak Roger Martin, owner of Penn Avenue Meats in Hagerstown, uses Louisiana chef and cookbook author Paul Prudhomme's seasonings to blacken steak. He doesn't recommend the technique for chicken, which is too likely to overcook, or fish, which falls apart easily. Martin fires up his grill and preheats a cast-iron skillet. The skillet is necessary to form the blackened crust on the meat, Martin said. He prepares the steak for blackening by coating both sides with melted butter.
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